ECE Preparation for ABET Review - Stevens Institute of Technology

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Self Study Report for the
Computer Engineering Program

According to Engineering Criteria 2000
2003-2004 Accreditation Cycle






Submitted by
Stevens Institute of Technology
Hoboken, New Jersey

to the

Engineering Accreditation Commission
Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology, Inc.
111 Market Place, Suite 1050
Baltimore, Maryland 21202-40127/27/02











June 26, 2003


TABLE OF CONTENTS
 TOC \o "1-2" A. Background Information  PAGEREF _Toc44084723 \h 5
A1 Degree Titles  PAGEREF _Toc44084724 \h 5
A2 Program Modes  PAGEREF _Toc44084725 \h 7
A3 Actions to Correct Previous Deficiencies  PAGEREF _Toc44084726 \h 10
A4 Contact Information  PAGEREF _Toc44084727 \h 12
B. Accreditation Summary  PAGEREF _Toc44084728 \h 13
B1 Students  PAGEREF _Toc44084729 \h 13
B2 Program Educational Objectives  PAGEREF _Toc44084730 \h 21
B3 Program Outcomes and Assessment  PAGEREF _Toc44084731 \h 42
B4 Professional Component  PAGEREF _Toc44084732 \h 75
B5 Faculty  PAGEREF _Toc44084733 \h 81
B6 Facilities  PAGEREF _Toc44084734 \h 84
B7 Institutional Support and Financial Resources  PAGEREF _Toc44084735 \h 90
B8 Special Program Criteria  PAGEREF _Toc44084736 \h 92
Appendix I Additional Program Information  PAGEREF _Toc44084737 \h 94
I-A Tabular Data for Program  PAGEREF _Toc44084738 \h 94
I-B Course Syllabi  PAGEREF _Toc44084739 \h 101
I-C Faculty Curriculum Vitae  PAGEREF _Toc44084740 \h 196
I-D School of Engineering Assessment System  PAGEREF _Toc44084741 \h 220
I-E Detailed SoE Outcomes  PAGEREF _Toc44084742 \h 229
I-F: Program Specific Information  PAGEREF _Toc44084743 \h 241
I-G CpE Evaluations  PAGEREF _Toc44084744 \h 258
I-H Capstone Project APCs - Objectives 7 through 13  PAGEREF _Toc44084745 \h 284
Appendix II Institutional Profile  PAGEREF _Toc44084746 \h 288
II-A Institutional Background Information  PAGEREF _Toc44084747 \h 288
II-B Background Information for the Charles V. Schaefer, Jr., School of Engineering  PAGEREF _Toc44084748 \h 293




Figures
 TOC \t "CaptionF" \c Figure B2.1. Schematic of the School of Engineering Curriculum  PAGEREF _Toc44084749 \h 28
Figure B2.2. Organization of ECE Department for Curriculum Decisions  PAGEREF _Toc44084750 \h 30
Figure B2.3. SoE Objectives Assessment Process  PAGEREF _Toc44084751 \h 33
Figure B3.1. Hierarchical organization of outcome definitions and performance criteria.  PAGEREF _Toc44084752 \h 43
Figure B3.2. SoE Outcomes Assessment Process  PAGEREF _Toc44084753 \h 52
Figure B3.3. CpE student performance assessment by course instructor  PAGEREF _Toc44084754 \h 55
Figure B3.4. Instructions for completion of Student Performance Assessment form (SoE-EAC).  PAGEREF _Toc44084755 \h 56
Figure B3.5. Example of instructor's completed student performance assessment form  PAGEREF _Toc44084756 \h 57
Figure B3.6 Instructor Course Assessment Form  PAGEREF _Toc44084757 \h 59
Figure B3.7. General structure of Web-based evaluation of course by student  PAGEREF _Toc44084758 \h 60
Figure B3.8. Overall CpE program assessment.  PAGEREF _Toc44084759 \h 65
Figure B3.9 Fall 02 EBI exit survey results for CpE students  PAGEREF _Toc44084760 \h 68
Figure I-D.1. School of Engineering Assessment System  PAGEREF _Toc44084761 \h 221
Figure I-F.1. CpE Undergraduate Male/Female Mixture (Seniors)  PAGEREF _Toc44084762 \h 241
Figure I-F.2. Ethnic Mixture of CpE Program (Seniors)  PAGEREF _Toc44084763 \h 242
Figure I-F.3. ECE Co-op Student Participation  PAGEREF _Toc44084764 \h 242



Tables
 TOC \t "CaptionT" \c "Table" Table A.1: Minors in EE and CpE  PAGEREF _Toc44084766 \h 6
Table A.2: ECE Graduate Certificates  PAGEREF _Toc44084767 \h 7
Table A.3. Stevens Cooperative Education Program Schedule  PAGEREF _Toc44084768 \h 9
Table A.4. Actions to correct previous ABET deficiencies  PAGEREF _Toc44084769 \h 11
Table B1.1. Grade Quality Points  PAGEREF _Toc44084770 \h 13
Table B2.1. SoE and CpE Mission Statements  PAGEREF _Toc44084771 \h 21
Table B2.2. School of Engineering Objectives  PAGEREF _Toc44084772 \h 21
Table B2.3. CpE Program Objectives  PAGEREF _Toc44084773 \h 22
Table B2.4. ECE External Advisory Board  PAGEREF _Toc44084774 \h 24
Table B3.1 Stevens Assessment Terminology  PAGEREF _Toc44084775 \h 42
Table B3.2. Relation of Program Outcomes to ABET Criteria  PAGEREF _Toc44084776 \h 44
Table B3.3. Relationships between CpE Outcomes, Abet Criteria, and CpE Objectives  PAGEREF _Toc44084777 \h 50
Table B3.4. Mapping of Core Engineering Course Outcomes to Program Outcomes  PAGEREF _Toc44084778 \h 63
Table B3.5. Mapping of CpE Required Courses to CpE Outcomes 1 through 6.  PAGEREF _Toc44084779 \h 64
Table B5.1. ECE Faculty  PAGEREF _Toc44084780 \h 81
Table B5.2. Association between faculty and programs  PAGEREF _Toc44084781 \h 82
Table B6.1: Laboratory Facilities for CpE Engineering Program  PAGEREF _Toc44084782 \h 85
Table I-A.1. Basic-Level Curriculum: B.E. in Computer Engineering (2002-03 catalog).  PAGEREF _Toc44084783 \h 94
Table I-A.2. Course and Section Size Summary: Computer Engineering (AY 2002-2003)  PAGEREF _Toc44084784 \h 96
Table I-A.3. Faculty Workload Summary  PAGEREF _Toc44084785 \h 97
Table I-A.4. Faculty Analysis (Computer Engineering)  PAGEREF _Toc44084786 \h 99
Table I-A.5. Support Expenditures: B.E. Computer Engineering  PAGEREF _Toc44084787 \h 100
Table I-D.1. School of Engineering Assessment Terminology  PAGEREF _Toc44084788 \h 222
Table I-D.2. School of Engineering Curriculum Outcomes and their Relationship to ABET Criterion 3 a-k  PAGEREF _Toc44084789 \h 223
Table I-D.3. School of Engineering Curriculum Outcome 3 and Related Performance Criteria  PAGEREF _Toc44084790 \h 224
Table I-F.1. (a) CpE specific study plan developed for ECE students  PAGEREF _Toc44084791 \h 245
Table I-F.1. (b) Completed Study Plan  PAGEREF _Toc44084792 \h 247
Table I-F.1. (c) Completed Application for Candidacy form  PAGEREF _Toc44084793 \h 249
Table I-F.2. ECE Capstone Projects (2002-2003)  PAGEREF _Toc44084794 \h 254
Table I-F.3. Salary data for ECE undergraduates graduating in 2003.  PAGEREF _Toc44084795 \h 256
Table I-G.1: Computer Engineering Alumni Survey Results  PAGEREF _Toc44084796 \h 266
Table I-G.2 Computer Engineering Co-Op Student Survey Results (32/33 students)  PAGEREF _Toc44084797 \h 267
Table I-G.3 Computer Engineering Co-Op Employer Survey Results (27/33 employers)  PAGEREF _Toc44084798 \h 270
Table I-G.4. Spring 2003 CpE student course evaluations - Outcomes.  PAGEREF _Toc44084799 \h 273
Table I-G.5. Spring 2003 CpE student course evaluations - Details.  PAGEREF _Toc44084800 \h 274
Table II-A.1. Faculty and Student Count for Institution  PAGEREF _Toc44084801 \h 289
Table II-B.1. (a) Stevens School and Department Structure  PAGEREF _Toc44084802 \h 295
Table II-B.1. (b). Stevens Institute Governance  PAGEREF _Toc44084803 \h 296
Table II-B.1. (c). Charles V. Schaefer Jr., School of Engineering Structure  PAGEREF _Toc44084804 \h 297
Table II-B.2 (Part 1). Engineering Programs Offered  PAGEREF _Toc44084805 \h 302
Table II-B.2 (Part 2). Degrees Awarded and Transcript Designations  PAGEREF _Toc44084806 \h 304
Table II-B.3. Supporting Academic Departments  PAGEREF _Toc44084807 \h 310
Table II-B.4(a). Support Expenditures  PAGEREF _Toc44084808 \h 310
Table II-B.4(b) Expenditures  PAGEREF _Toc44084809 \h 311
Table II-B.5. Personnel and Students  PAGEREF _Toc44084810 \h 312
Table II-B.6. Faculty Salary Data*  PAGEREF _Toc44084811 \h 322
Table II-B.7 (a). Engineering Enrollment and Degree Data (Entire School of Engineering)  PAGEREF _Toc44084812 \h 323
Table II-B.7 (b). Engineering Enrollment and Degree Data (Chemical Engineering)  PAGEREF _Toc44084813 \h 324
Table II-B.7 (c). Engineering Enrollment and Degree Data (Computer Engineering)  PAGEREF _Toc44084814 \h 325
Table II-B-7 (d). Engineering Enrollment and Degree Data (Electrical Engineering)  PAGEREF _Toc44084815 \h 326
Table II-B.7 (e). Engineering Enrollment and Degree Data (Biomedical Concentration)  PAGEREF _Toc44084816 \h 327
Table II-B.7 (f). Engineering Enrollment and Degree Data (Engineering Management)  PAGEREF _Toc44084817 \h 328
Table II-B.7 (g). Engineering Enrollment and Degree Data (Environmental Engineering)  PAGEREF _Toc44084818 \h 329
Table II-B.8. History of Admissions Standards for Freshmen (See note below)  PAGEREF _Toc44084819 \h 331
Table II-B.9. Recent history of transfer students in SoE programs  PAGEREF _Toc44084820 \h 333
Table II-B.10. Cooperative Education Student Participation By Major  PAGEREF _Toc44084821 \h 338
 A. Background Information
A1 Degree Titles
A1.1 Bachelor of Engineering in Computer Engineering
The Bachelor of Engineering in Computer Engineering is the primary undergraduate degree of the computer engineering program. Requirements for this degree reflect the joint expectations of the Charles V. Schaefer, Jr. School of Engineering and its Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and are represented by curriculum templates included in the Stevens' Undergraduate Catalog. These templates include an intensive general engineering education, the Engineering Core, defining most of the first four semesters of study and extending into the fifth and sixth semesters. Discipline specific courses and discipline electives are offered mainly during the fifth through eighth semesters of study.
Students completing a Bachelor of Engineering degree complete a study plan, consistent with the Stevens' Undergraduate Catalog's Computer Engineering program template. Appendix I-F.2 includes the CpE-specific study plan forms for students entering Stevens during the 2002-03 academic years. These CpE-specific forms are posted on the Web site of the ECE Department (standard study plan forms available on the Stevens Web site are generic School of Engineering study plans without the discipline-specific required course). The requirements, as reflected in these study plans (and the corresponding catalog descriptions), have evolved continually over the past 5 years, in both the Engineering Core program and in the Computer Engineering requirements. A student is expected to fulfill the requirements defined in the Steven's Undergraduate Catalog for the academic year in which the student begins his/her studies. A student can change to a later catalog, but in so doing must complete all requirements specified in that later catalog.
Students with outstanding pre-college academic records may be admitted to Stevens Institute of Technology within its Scholars Program. Students in the Scholars Program complete a set of four Honors Research Seminars and are provided with various opportunities reflecting their high academic performance.
Special degree programs supplement the basic Bachelor's degree.
A Simultaneous Degree Program through which students can complete a bachelor's and master's degree concurrently in four years.
An Accelerated Degree Program through which students can complete the requirements for a bachelor's degree in three years.
A Deferred Graduate Credit Program allowing a student to enroll in extra courses at no extra tuition, the extra credits being applicable to a master's degree.
A1.2 Minors Offered by ECE Department
A student completing the program of another discipline can obtain a Minor in Electrical Engineering (a minor available to CpE majors) or in Computer Engineering by completing the five required courses specified in the ECE portion of the Undergraduate Catalog. Students in the ECE program (either EE or CpE) can apply courses in their major to satisfy the course requirements for a minor in the other ECE program. The required courses for the minors are shown in Table A.1.


Table A.1: Minors in EE and CpEMinor in Electrical EngineeringMinor in Computer EngineeringE 246: Electronics & InstrumentationE 246: Electronics & InstrumentationEE 348: Systems TheoryCpE 390: Microprocessor SystemsCpE 358: Switching Theory & Logic DesignCpE 358: Switching Theory & Logic DesignCpE 390: Microprocessor SystemsCpE 360: Computational Data Structures & AlgorithmsEE 465: Introduction to Communications CpE 490: Information Systems Engineering I
A1.3 NYU Dual Degree Program in Science and Engineering
Stevens and the New York University College of Arts and Science have a well-established 3/2 Dual Degree Program that offers students the opportunity to complete a Bachelor of Science degree at NYU and a Bachelor of Engineering degree at Stevens in 5 years. Articulation of basic science and humanities requirements with NYU assures that all requirements for the Stevens engineering programs are met. To allow students to complete the engineering degree in two years at Stevens, a number of Stevens’ core engineering courses are taken by NYU students in the Dual Degree Program while they are students at NYU. Stevens’ faculty teach the majority of these core courses. The Program has approximately 20-25 students per year who enter the two-year Stevens portion of the program. Typically, about 10 students per year enter the CpE program.
An example of course requirements for NYU students completing BS degrees in Math or Computer Science at NYU and completing a BE in Computer Engineering from Stevens is given in Appendix I-F.3 for students entering NYU during the 2002-2003 academic year. Students in the program complete technical and regular electives at both institutions. In some cases, a student will have completed a course at NYU that presents the essential components of a CpE discipline-specific course at Stevens. In such cases, with the approval of the Stevens coordinator (Prof. Cole) and the Director of ECE, CpE-specific courses may be waived. However, the total number of credits completed at Stevens does not change, requiring that the student complete a technical elective beyond those in the template. In addition, some students request permission to use an NYU course to satisfy one of the technical/general elective requirements. With the approval of the Director of ECE, such permissions are given if the specific course to be used is within the spirit of ECE program.
A1.4 Graduate Certificate Programs
The Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering offers a variety of topic-specific graduate certificates, generally consisting of a set of four regular graduate program courses. In the case of graduate degrees, students completing the four certificate courses can use them for credit as electives in their graduate degree program and also receive the Certificate upon completion of the courses. This policy also applies to undergraduates taking Graduate Certificate program courses. In particular, these courses can be applied to technical elective requirements for the student's BE in Computer Engineering degree as well as leading to a Graduate Certificate in the Certificate's topic(s). A listing of the courses associated with the ECE Graduate Certificates are given in Appendix I-F.4. These Certificates include both 500- and 600-level courses. A formal process was established by the Stevens Graduate School to approve undergraduate student enrollments in 600-level courses. In general, the requirements directly reflect the admission requirements for the Master's degree program. Students can enroll in 500-level courses with the permission of the instructor, with the understanding that the 500-level courses are graduate level courses and that grading reflects expectations regarding the preparation of students in the Master's program. Many of the ECE Graduate Certificate courses are offered on-line for application to the Stevens' continuing education program. The ECE Graduate Certificate programs typically used by ECE undergraduates are given in Table A.2.
.
Table A.2: ECE Graduate CertificatesElectrical Engineering CertificatesComputer Engineering CertificatesWireless CommunicationsNetworked Information Systems Digital Signal ProcessingSecure Network Systems Design Microelectronics and Photonics* Multimedia Technology* Joint with the Departments of Physics andof Materials Engineering.

A2 Program Modes
The program is offered in three modes.
1. The four-year on-campus day mode is the primary mode of offering. (Students experiencing difficulties in their first semester may choose a 5-year reduced-load program at no extra tuition cost).
2 A significant number of students (approx. 40% of all engineering students – change to match program statistics) opt for the five-year Cooperative Education day mode. There are no differences among the different modes in the attainment of ABET criteria.
3. Finally, some of our students are part of a “three-two” articulated “Dual Degree” program with New York University.
The BE degree in Computer Engineering is primarily a full-time program with courses offered between 8:00 am and 4:00 pm. A few upper-class undergraduate courses are offered as evening courses (6:30 pm - 9:00 pm) to avoid conflicts with daytime courses being taken by the students. There are no off-campus undergraduate courses offered in the Computer Engineering program.
An important component of the Stevens' undergraduate program is its co-op component, an option taken by approximately 40% of the Computer Engineering undergraduate students. The CpE enrollment history in the co-op program is given in Appendix I-F.1.
On-campus graduate program courses (including 500-level courses available to qualified undergraduates) are offered in the evening (6:30 pm - 9:00 pm) to support part-time students needing access to the course offerings outside their normal job schedule.
Over the past three years, a number of graduate courses, many available to undergraduate students for use as program technical/general electives, have been offered as asynchronous distance learning courses, through the Steven's WebCampus organization in the Graduate School.
A2.1 Standard Full-Time Program
The full-time Bachelor's of Engineering in Computer Engineering program consists of eight semesters of on-campus study, normally completed in four years. This full time program consists of a mixture of various types of courses summarized as follows.
1. Courses/topics specified by the Institute and/or the School of Engineering, including:
a Required completion of a specified number of courses in humanities and in physical education (distributed over all eight terms of the Bachelor's in Engineering program).
b Required completion of specific courses in science and mathematics (scheduled for completion during the first four terms of the Bachelor's in Engineering program).
c Required general engineering courses completed by all engineering program graduates (concentrated in the first four terms but extending into the fifth and sixth terms of the Bachelor's in Engineering program).
d Topical areas required by the School of Engineering but delivered as discipline-specific courses (starting during the fourth Term and extending through the eighth Term).
2. Courses specified by the Computer Engineering program, including
a Required courses specified by the discipline (CpE) but not specified as topical requirements by the School of Engineering (starting during the fourth term and extending through the seventh term).
b Technical CpE elective courses usually taken from among the ECE courses but, with approval by the student's academic advisor, possibly taken from other engineering or science disciplines (distributed between the fourth term and the eighth term).
c “Free” CpE electives. The ECE department allows students to apply any Stevens course (technical or non-technical) to fulfill the “free” elective requirements (taken during the seventh and eighth terms).
A2.2 Stevens' Cooperative Education (Co-Op) Program
The Stevens' Cooperative Education program involves alternating semesters of education and full-time professional work at a company. Students in the Cooperative Education program complete their BE degree in five years, following one of two schedules (Schedules A and B) for their sequence of courses and work. These schedules are shown in Table A.3.

Table A.3. Stevens Cooperative Education Program ScheduleSchedule ASchedule BYear 1FallCoursesCoursesSpringCoursesCoursesSummerInternshipEitherYear 2FallCoursesInternshipSpringInternshipCoursesSummerCoursesInternshipYear 3FallInternshipCoursesSpringCoursesInternshipSummerInternshipEitherYear 4FallCoursesInternshipSpringInternshipCoursesSummerInternshipEither InternshipYear 5FallCoursesCoursesSpringCoursesCoursesSummerInternshipEither


A3 Actions to Correct Previous Deficiencies
A3.1 School of Engineering Actions to Correct Deficiencies
The previous ABET evaluation team identified three areas of concern not specific to a particular Program. These are identified below and actions taken in response are described.

The ABET team expressed concern about the Library. While problems remain, good progress has been made not only in maintaining the essential services the Library has always offered, but also in selectively expanding and enhancing the Library's capabilities to better meet the needs of the academic and research communities at Stevens. The Samuel C. Williams Library has pioneered in offering "just-in-time" service tailored to the needs of the Stevens’ faculty, students and staff. This model maximizes use of Library materials and resources while effectively serving the information needs of our community. The ABET team suggested an increased attention to the training of users of the Library. This has been addressed through a proactive staff working with the Stevens’ community and through the Library’s Web site. Such actions have been accompanied by a doubling of library use. Additional detail regarding the Library are presented in Appendix II-A.6
The ABET team expressed concern with regard to support of the Computing Infrastructure, particularly the network. Subsequent action included a major upgrade of the wired campus network with high-speed fiber optical connections to all campus buildings including dormitories and Greek housing. Major investments have been made in networked classrooms configured to promote collaborative learning. A wireless campus network has been deployed, covering almost all of the campus. Stevens also established a program providing each undergraduate with a personal laptop computer and a variety of software products. These proactive initiatives have established a level of network access and computational resources available to the student than would have been possible otherwise.. An inter-school advisory panel in 2002 was convened to make recommendations to the administration on IT needs and priorities. Their recommendations were accepted and plans have been established for implementation of a web portal in late 2003, replacement of the main server hosting websites, and other actions. Upgrade of administrative software is included in these plans. The Information Technology Department has been reorganized to improve its service activities.
The ABET team noted that Engineering Programs in Polymer Engineering, in Materials Engineering and in Engineering Physics had experienced low enrollments and expressed concern for their future health. These three programs have now been eliminated.
A3.2 Actions to Correct CpE Program Deficiencies
The previous ABET evaluation of the CpE program included one “cause for concern,” raised an issue related to the Library, commented on the “unfortunately high” teaching load for senior faculty, and expressed “disappointment in that design tasks in some intermediate-level subjects...provide minimal feedback to students on finished projects.” These deficiencies and actions to correct them are summarized in Table A.4.



Table A.4. Actions to correct previous ABET deficienciesCause for Concern
“The Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering has been without a permanent director for a year. .... The School of Engineering is strongly urged to move aggressively to rectify this problem”Corrective Actions
A new director was appointed at the start of the Fall 1998 semester and has served as director of the ECE Department since that time.Teaching Load
“Teaching loads are unfortunately high for senior faculty”Corrective Actions
The ECE Department has hired ten new faculty members over the past five years, for a total of 12 faculty members (including a non tenure-track member). Teaching loads in terms of the number of courses taught have been relieved, though the large enrollment in the CpE program has led to some large class sizes. Planning is on-going to reduce the size of class sections.Library
“Students are highly critical of the Library”Corrective Actions
Corrective actions are described in Section A3.1, the School of Engineering’s report on corrective actionsStudent Project Feedback
“One slight disappointment is that design tasks in some intermediate level subjects ... provide minimal feedback to students on finished projectsCorrective Actions
The School of Engineering has recruited special faculty members to manage the Engineering Design Spine courses and no evidence of problems such as reported by the ABET committee are now apparent.
A4 Contact Information
The primary, pre-visit contact person is the ECE Director,
Stuart Tewksbury, Director
Dept. of Elect. and Comp. Eng. Tel: +1 201 216-8096 (direct)
Burchard 212 +1 201 216-5623 (office)
Stevens Institute of Technology Fax: +1 201 216-8246 (office)
Hoboken, NJ 07030 Email: stewksbu@stevens-tech.edu

B. Accreditation Summary
B1 Students
B1.1 Institute Evaluation of Students
B1.1.1 School of Engineering and Institute Level
Stevens’ general policies regarding student evaluation and grading are contained in the Stevens’ Catalog and are also available through the Registrar’s Web site (http://attila.stevens-tech.edu/registrar/).
Objectives and Standards.
Course objectives are provided to the students with a Course Outline for each course describing the course’s purpose, objectives, procedures, requirements, and content, and, if appropriate, listing the specific objectives for each lesson. The Program Committee is responsible for reviewing the course objectives to ensure that they are consistent with program objectives.
Students receive a printed report of their grades at the end of each term. In addition, they can view their grades immediately after grades are posted, along with their entire transcripts, on the “Web for Students” Web site. In cases where WebCT, the on-line system for delivery of course material, is used as part of the course, student can view their grades throughout the term via the “My Grades” icon on the course WebCT sites. The printed report sent to the student by the Registrar, also posted on the “Web for Students” site, includes final grades, the average grade achieved for the term, and the cumulative grade point average for all courses completed by the student. In accordance with the Privacy Act, students must give permission in writing for the Registrar’s Office to send academic reports to parents or guardians. Grade reports are mailed at the end of each term.

Table B1.1. Grade Quality PointsA4.00A-3.67B+ 3.33B3.00B-2.67C+2.33C 2.00C-1.67 D1.00 F0.00 P0.00
Grade Point Averages.
Final course letter grades are assigned numerical quality points as illustrated in Table B1.1. From these quality points, a Current Grade Point Average (GPA) is calculated as a weighted (by Quality Hours) average of the grade quality points for every course taken in the current term. A Cumulative Grade Point Average (GPA) is calculated similarly, using all courses completed for the student’s program. If a student repeats a course, the grade achieved in the repeated courses replace prior grades in the course. The Cumulative GPA is an index of cumulative performance in the academic program and corresponds to grade point average (GPA) or grade point ratio (GPR) used in other colleges and universities.
B1.1.2 Department Level
Within the ECE Department, responsibility for assessing the academic performance of the student lies with the instructor for each course. Students encountering a conflict with his/her instructor are encouraged to meet with the Department Director to review the conditions related to the conflict. Following this meeting, the Director may meet with the instructor to discuss the situation, mainly to determine whether the action(s) of the instructor are consistent with Institute policies and are generally consistent with the Department’s expectations of fair grading and treatment of all students. In the event that the conflict can not be resolved informally, a meeting is called with the student, the instructor, and the Director to discuss the issue. Except under extraordinary situations, the course instructor retains the authority to assign grades throughout all phases of any departmental review following a student complaint. Generally, conflicts are resolved to the satisfaction of the student by this point in the process. In the event that the conflict is not resolved through the departmental review, the student is advised to meet with the Dean of the School of Engineering or the Dean of Undergraduate Academics to discuss the conflict.
Undergraduates at Stevens are bound to a formal honor code system based on the issues surrounding plagiarism. If a violation of the honor code impacts less than 12% of the student's grade for the course involved, the instructor is empowered to impose a grade penalty, a penalty that the student can appeal to the student-operated Honor Board. If a suspected violation impacts more than 12% of the course grade, the instructor is required to submit evidence of any suspected violation of the Honor Code to the Honor Board, through the Dean of Undergraduate Academics. The Honor Board, after investigating the evidence, can dismiss the case or assign a penalty, which is provided to the instructor submitting the case. The ECE Department views plagiarism (copying without detailed attribution from any source, including another student) in submitted homework as a serious violation of the Stevens Honor Code. The Steven’s Honor Code, along with a clear definition of plagiarism, is published on the Stevens’ Web site. The basic requirements and responsibilities are summarized in Appendix I-F.7.
B1.2 Advising of Students
B1.2.1 School of Engineering and Institute Level
The Office of the Dean of Undergraduate Academics coordinates the decentralized, faculty-based academic counseling system. This system is described in the Student Services section of the Undergraduate Course Catalog published annually and is also available on the Stevens’ Web site ( HYPERLINK "http://attila.stevens-tech.edu/ugrad_academics/" http://attila.stevens-tech.edu/ugrad_academics/). Freshmen Faculty Advisors are faculty members from the various academic departments. These Advisors are assigned upon a student’s arrival at Stevens to provide continuing academic guidance. The Freshmen Faculty Advisor remains the student's Faculty Advisor until the student formally enters his/her specific Program area of study. This change occurs for engineering students though the completion of a Program Study Plan approved by a Program Faculty Advisor from the program’s department during Term 3. The Dean of Undergraduate Academics serves as the advisor for transfer students during their first semester, after which they complete a Program Study Plan approved by their Program Advisor.
Detailed information on all academic requirements at Stevens, including core graduation requirements and those for the major, are available in the course catalog and on-line to students and faculty. (See http://attila.stevens-tech.edu/registrar/) In addition, all students have access to the Office of the Dean of Undergraduate Academics during normal working hours.
Students select a major or a field of study during their third semester. To help in the choice, students can attend Advising Fairs to gain more information, can review information posted on the departments’ Web sites, and can meet with the Department’s Director and faculty to review a program. Students also acquire information through discussions with their Freshmen Faculty Advisors, with other Stevens’ faculty, and with fellow students.
A Program faculty advisor assists the student in completing a Program Study Plan, ensuring that the student makes appropriate choices of electives. The completed Study Plan is reviewed and signed by the advisor. The original Study Plan is filed with the Office of the Registrar, a copy is provided to the student, and a second copy is provided for the Program Department’s files. The Office of the Dean of Undergraduate Academics has overall responsibility for managing the Study Plan program.
B1.2.1 ECE Department and CpE Program Levels
Upon starting their junior year (5th semester), an ECE faculty member is assigned (or selected by the student) as the student's academic program advisor. At this time, each undergraduate student completes a formal “study plan” detailing the specific courses that s/he will complete to fulfill their requirements for a Bachelor's degree in her/his chosen discipline. In general, a student’s faculty advisor is the faculty member who signs the student’s first CpE specific study plan. At the request of a student, a new faculty member can be selected as advisor. It is understood that a student 's plans for technical and/or general electives (or for options available within the Humanities requirements) may change as s/he progresses through the plan of study. For this reason, the student can revise the study plan as needed, with the requirement that each revision be approved by the student's advisor (or, in the absence of the student’s normal advisor, a full-time faculty member of the ECE Department who agrees to review the student’s study plan).
Study plan forms are available to students either in paper form or as downloads from the Stevens' Web site. These study plan forms are based on the School of Engineering's specifications in the student's Stevens Undergraduate Catalog of record. Some students have been confused by the absence of discipline specific courses on these study plan forms. In addition, it has been difficult for advisors to verify that a student’s study plan meets all program requirements, due to variations in the way the study plans are completed. For such reasons, the ECE Department has generated a set of electronic study plan forms specific to the CpE program for all entry years between 1998 and 2003. These forms (see example in Appendix I-F.2) replicate the standard forms but have added the discipline-specific required courses that each CpE student must complete. Students are able to modify only those sections of the study plan where alternatives are possible. Upon completion of these CpE-specific electronic versions of the study plans, the student provides a printed copy to his/her advisor for review and approval. The CpE-specific study plans are accessible at the ECE Web site .
As the student approaches completion of her/his studies (typically in Semester 7), s/he completes an “Application for Candidacy” form similar to the study plan. This form, like the student's study plan, must be reviewed and approved by the student's advisor, after which it is submitted to the Stevens Registrar’s Office. An example of a completed study plan and an example of a completed application for candidacy plan are shown in Appendix I-F.2.
The responsibilities for student advising are shared among all the ECE faculty members, with each having roughly equal numbers of advisees. Since students typically select their advisors, there is no departmental mechanism to enforce an equal distribution of advisees among the faculty.
B1.3 Process to Monitor Students
B1.3.1 General School of Engineering and Institute Processes
Study Plans.
Students continue to consult with their Concentration Faculty Advisors during the remainder of their undergraduate education. If their Faculty Advisor departs, recommendations on replacement Advisors are made by the department and students choose a different Advisor. Revisions or changes to the Study Plans, including changes of electives, are approved and input into their plan. A new Study Plan is signed by the Faculty Advisor and filed with the Office of the Registrar and copies kept on file in the Department.
Satisfactory Academic Progress.
If a student's Grade Point Average for a semester falls below a 2.0, the Faculty Committee on Undergraduate Promotions, under the direction of the Dean of Undergraduate Academics, will place the student into one of the following categories: Academic Warning, Mandatory Reduced Load, Academic Probation, or Required to Withdraw (the latter category usually requires more than one semester of poor performance). In all such cases the student receives a letter from the Dean of Undergraduate Academics discussing the student's performance and corrective measures to be taken. Additionally, all students on Academic Probation are placed in the Academic Support Program (ASP), which requires that the student fills out a Self-Evaluation Questionnaire and meets regularly with one of the academic deans during the following semester.
To satisfy the academic portion of the graduation requirements, an engineering student must:
Complete successfully (“D” or better) each course in the core curriculum or provide transfer equivalence.
Satisfy the requirements for the engineering major (“D” or better in each course)
Achieve a 2.00 Cumulative Grade Point Average (GPA)
Pass an English Competency Test
The Registrar’s Office performs checks on each student’s Study Plan when it is updated, and before a degree is awarded. These checks ensure that all Stevens’ graduation requirements and all requirements for the student’s selected major are met.
B1.3.2 ECE Department Processes
All student records (grades, special conditions, etc.) are maintained by the Registrar’s Office. The ECE Department does not maintain an independent set of records replicating those of the Office of the Registrar. Information regarding student records can be requested from the Registrar's Office, when such requests are appropriate and do not violate privacy issues related to the student. This centralization of records ensures correct maintenance and consistent monitoring of student records.
Students generally register for courses using the on-line registration system. While entering courses into this system, the student’s records are checked to ensure that prerequisites and other requirements associated with the course are satisfied. On occasion a students record of courses may reflect special conditions (e.g., in the past, transfer credits were not fully entered into the student’s records database used for course registration). If this electronic registration system determines that a student fails to qualify for a course, the student is prevented from registering for the course. In order to enroll for a course in this case, the student must submit a special enrollment form approved by the instructor of the course and by the student’s faculty advisor. Primary responsibility for judging whether such a student is qualified to register for a course lies with the course instructor. If the instructor can not available to review and approve the student’s request, the ECE Director may provide approval, with the understanding that any special approval may need to be reviewed by the course instructor as soon as possible. The course instructor has the option of overriding any approvals provided by the ECE Director on his/her behalf.
The ECE Department encourages undergraduates who have achieved a high level of academic performance to consider graduate courses with substantial overlap to a required undergraduate course. A student taking this option (with the approval of his/her advisor) will appear to have not satisfied requirements for the undergraduate degree in the electronic records of the Office of the Registrar. In such cases, the student must complete the appropriate forms to formally waive the required undergraduate course on the basis of having completed the graduate level course.
During the student's 7th semester of study, the Registrar's Office performs an audit of the student's record to identify any deficiencies in the student's record of academic study that would compromise satisfying program requirements. In the event that deficiencies are identified and the student believes the audit's stated deficiencies are incorrect, s/he can meet with her/his advisor (or the ECE Department Director) to review any deficiencies and assist the student in resolving issues related to deficiencies.
In the event that a student encounters a conflict with (or is not satisfied with) his/her advisor, the student can select a new advisor at any time.
B1.4 Policies for Acceptance of Transfer Credit
B1.4.1 School of Engineering and Institute Policies
The Office of Undergraduate Admissions coordinates the transfer student acceptance system. This system is described in the Applying for Admission to Stevens’ section of the Undergraduate Course Catalog, which is published annually and is available online at the Undergraduate Admissions web site. The credit evaluation process begins with a transfer student submitting a Transfer Credit Evaluation Form to the Office of Undergraduate Admissions. This form lists all of the courses the student wishes to have evaluated. Course Catalog descriptions from the respective institutions where these courses were taken are also required. In some cases, the Office of Undergraduate Admissions may also request a course syllabus for a course that is being evaluated. The more information a student provides, the better chance they have of receiving credit.
The Transfer Credit Evaluation Form is sent to the Director of the student’s academic department who then either directly evaluates the transfer course or refers it to other appropriate members of the Program Faculty. The faculty member evaluates the transfer request and then signs the form to either certify that there is an equivalent Stevens course and to allow the transfer or to signify that no transfer can be granted. The completed form is returned to Undergraduate Admissions.
The Admissions Department then seeks final approval from the Dean of Undergraduate Academics. Upon receipt of the Dean's approval, Admissions notifies the student via mail of the results, as well as provides the Registrar with the information so that it may be incorporated into the student's academic record.
B1.4.2 ECE Department Policies
Within the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, the expectation is that a course to be transferred matches in topic and depth the corresponding course being offered by the department. In the case of highly ranked universities, the catalog description is usually adequate for determining whether the course can be used to waive a required course in the undergraduate CpE curriculum. In other cases, the student may be asked to provide additional information (e.g., textbook used, course syllabus, etc) to demonstrate that the depth of the course to be transferred matches or exceeds that of the course to be waived.
Waiving of a required course in the CpE student’s program requires substantial overlap of the content and depth of the courses. In some cases, the course being transferred does not match a required course in the CpE student’s program. In such cases, if the course being transferred has the appropriate depth, that course can be applied as either an elective or (when appropriate) a technical elective. The ECE Department reviews transfer of credit for those courses delivered by the ECE Department, including those courses in the Core Engineering Curriculum delivered by the ECE Department. Transfer of credit to satisfy courses offered by other departments is approved by the offering department.
In those cases where the course to be transferred is similar to but not of equivalent depth for an CpE program course, the transfer of credit is not allowed. The ECE Department does distinguish between training courses (e.g., as offered in some technical schools) and academic courses. Courses that are largely training specific are usually not allowed for transfer.
Based on the general criteria above, the Director of the ECE Department specifies on the Transfer of Credit form whether the transfer is recommended or not recommended. The final decisions regarding acceptance of a course for transfer credit is made by the Dean of Undergraduate Academics.
B1.5 Validation of Credit for Courses Taken Elsewhere
B1.5.1 School of Engineering and Institute Policies
The following guidelines are used when evaluating transfer credits:
Students must receive a C or higher in order for the credits to transfer.
Students with credits earned 5 years or more from their date of attendance will be evaluated for credit on a case-by-case basis.
Foreign language credits are not transferable.
Stevens Institute of Technology does not guarantee that credits earned elsewhere will fully satisfy the Stevens course requirements.
In all cases, the evaluation is based upon the equivalence and level of coverage of the subject matter to the appropriate Stevens course. The placement of the proposed transfer course in the other institution’s curriculum, its prerequisites, and the number of credits, course outline and text are all reviewed. A minimum grade of “C” is required for transfer credit. Courses taken on a pass/fail basis are unacceptable. Each student must complete at least 50% of the courses toward a degree at Stevens and at least five courses must be technical electives taken in the junior and senior years.
Stevens conducts a one-year exchange program with the Technical University of Dundee. Students in the first semester of the junior year are eligible to participate in this program. The Office of the Dean of Undergraduate Academics monitors the program of any student who participates. The courses at the host institution are carefully selected to fit into the Stevens program. Each course is reviewed to ensure that appropriate ABET criteria are met and full transfer credit is normally granted to these students.
B1.5.2 ECE Department Process
Transfer of credits taken at another university is requested typically under two cases. One case involves the student completing one or more summer courses at a university near home and requesting transfer of credit for such courses towards his/her Stevens degree. The other case involves students spending a semester or year at a university overseas as part of the Stevens Exchange Program.
Students requesting transfer of credit for summer courses completed at another university (e.g., near home) submit the “Transfer of Credit” form discussed in Section B1.4. The conditions for approving such transfer of credit are similar to those for approving transfer of credit for incoming new students. It is expected that the depth of technical courses must match the corresponding depth of CpE program courses. Technical courses offered by community colleges and two-year colleges are generally not viewed as having sufficient depth to justify transfer of credit. In such cases, it is the responsibility of the student to provide all information requested by his/her advisor to justify the transfer of credit for technical courses. Transfer of credit for non-technical courses can be used to satisfy one of the CpE program elective requirements, if the course to be transferred demonstrates sufficient depth. Approval of transfer of credit for a course is made by the course’s offering department.
Students participating in the Stevens Exchange Program attend high quality universities and the depth of the courses proposed for transfer is generally at an acceptable level. Approval for transfer of CpE courses is the responsibility of the ECE Director and the criteria summarized in Section B1.5.1 are also used here. One complication often confronting the student is the extent to which s/he knows beforehand which specific courses will be taken at the other institution. For such reasons, the ECE Director reviews the general issues regarding course depth and equivalency with each student preparing for the exchange program but does not approve a generic and large list of possible courses. This is due mainly to the overlap of some courses with a single Stevens' CpE course, with pre-approval of multiple courses potentially leading to situations in which two or more courses relate to a single Stevens' CpE course. In these cases, the student contacts the ECE Director while at the other institution to review any courses not yet approved for transfer credit to ensure that they will be acceptable for transfer when the student returns to Stevens. Students participating in the Stevens Exchange Program have the flexibility of applying courses taken elsewhere as credit for CpE program technical electives or general electives. Over the past several years, no conflicts have appeared when using these processes for students participating in the Stevens Exchange Program.
B1.6 Process to Ensure All Students Meet All Program Requirements
B1.6.1 School of Engineering and Institute Policies
The student’s initial Study Plan form lists the courses that will ensure that the student meets all Program requirements. Students are expected to complete a study plan signed by their Program advisor at the end of the third semester. In response to recognition that some students were deferring this action, a process was implemented approximately two years ago to place a study plan hold on course registration after the fourth semester of a student’s progress if a signed study plan has not been filed. Likewise the pre-requisite/co-requisite controls were revised in 2001. Previously, the Registrar’s Office had to manually enter, each semester, the pre- and co-requisites for courses offered in that semester. Programming changes to the online registration software were made to automate this to a large degree. Substitutions are allowed only if the student meets with an academic advisor for approval and/or modifies the Study Plan. Near the end of the seventh semester, the student meets again with his or her academic advisor to complete the Application for Candidacy. This form is filled out with the student to verify what requirements need to be completed for satisfactory graduation. The Office of the Registrar also reviews the student’s file through a Degree Audit, thereby ensuring that graduating students complete the requirements for graduation. The study plan is compared to the transcript and a list of deficiencies is sent to the student prior to the final semester before graduation. A final check is made in the Office of the Registrar before graduation to ensure that any deficiencies have been made up.
B1.6.2 Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering Process
The Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering uses the Institute process as the basis for advisor review of deficiencies found by the Institute’s system in a student’s record. The Institute’s computer system provides an effective mechanism for tagging real and apparent deficiencies. Apparent deficiencies that do not compromise a student’s satisfying program requirements typically relate (i) to the handling of transfer credit by the computer system and (ii) student’s having taken graduate level versions of required CpE undergraduate courses. In cases where a student has not satisfied the program requirements, the student is required to correct all deficiencies before being allowed to graduate.

B2 Program Educational Objectives
B2.1 Program Educational Objectives
The mission of the Computer Engineering program and that of the School of Engineering are given in Table B2.1.

Table B2.1. SoE and CpE Mission StatementsSchool of EngineeringComputer Engineering ProgramThe Charles V. Schaefer Jr., School of Engineering is dedicated to educating students to have the breadth and depth required to lead in their chosen profession in an environment replete with the excitement of new knowledge and technology creation.The mission of the undergraduate computer engineering program in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering is to provide a balanced education in fundamental principles, design methodologies and practical experiences in computer engineering, general engineering, and physical and mathematical sciences topics through which the graduate can enter into and sustain a lifelong professional career of engineering innovation and creativity.
The School of Engineering objectives are stated as follows:
Table B2.2. School of Engineering ObjectivesThe graduates of the Charles V. Schaefer Jr., School of Engineering shall:ADemonstrate technical competence in engineering design and analysis consistent with the practice of a specialist and with the broad perspective of the generalist.BDevelop the hallmarks of professional conduct, including a keen cognizance of ethical choices, together with the confidence and skills to lead, to follow, and to transmit ideas effectively.CInculcate learning as a lifelong activity and as a means to the creative discovery, development, and implementation of technology.
The CpE program has established a broad general objective and a set of specific objectives, given in Table B2.3 below. Each objective is related to one or more of the CpE outcomes, discussed in Section B3, the SoE objectives above, and the ABET criteria. CpE objectives 1 through 3 specify objectives appropriate for a graduate of an computer engineer entering into a related career position or continuing his/her education at the graduate level. CpE objectives 4 through 7 are objectives common to all professionals in their careers. The Core Curriculum of the School of Engineering includes a significant component related to technology management, included to support the student’s ability to advance into leadership positions, including technical and business management (CpE objective 7).
Table B2.3. CpE Program ObjectivesGoalThe overriding goal of the computer engineering program is to provide the graduate with the skills and understanding needed to design and build innovative new products and services. They balance the competing requirements of competitive performance/cost and practical constraints imposed by available technologies.Detailed Objectives of CpE ProgramCpE ObjectiveCpE OutcomeSoE Objective1Graduates will understand the underlying principles and practices of digital circuits and systems, including design techniques, engineering design tools, mathematical methods, and physical technologies.1,2,3,4A2Graduates will participate effectively in team-based approaches to design, verification, and realization tasks.7,8A3Graduates will be proficient in the systematic exploration of the design space to achieve optimized designs.1,4,5A4Graduates will demonstrate compliance with professional ethics (for example, as stipulated in the IEEE Code of Ethics).10B5Graduates will be proficient in the use of communications (oral presentations and written reports) to articulate their ideas effectively.9B6Graduates will be prepared for the continuing learning and self-improvement necessary for a productive career in computer engineering.12C7Graduates will play leadership roles in their professions.6,7B

B2.2 Constituencies of CpE Program
The significant constituencies of the Computer Engineering program are
Students: Our current students are our first and foremost constituency, imposing the responsibility that their education prepare them for successful entry into a career followed by competitive and satisfying careers lasting a lifetime.
Alumni: The ECE Department’s alumni are an important constituency, not only from the perspective of providing feedback related to our program and the needs that they perceive from their positions of employment but also as an important network of contacts that can significantly assist our current students.
Employers: In the sense that we provide a “product,” the product from our undergraduate program is a qualified and effective student capable of contributing quickly and competitively to the needs of companies and organizations. Whether that “product” is found to be of substantial value to a given employer will depend on many detailed issues but the overriding issue is whether our students start their careers strongly and then continue to develop as the topics of their profession evolve and the needs of his/her employer adjust to the changing world in which we live. Through their advice regarding weaknesses in our program, we can better adjust it to meet the career needs of our students.
ECE Advisory Board: The External Advisory Board of the ECE Department provides a continuing mechanism for review of our program’s directions, weaknesses and accomplishments. Members of the External Advisory Board are listed in Table B2.4.
Faculty: The ECE faculty is an intrinsic constituency. With a substantial portion of new faculty members, old ideas are continually being challenged while new ideas are proposed and developed, creating a highly dynamic environment.
Some general comments regarding these constituencies are included below, highlighting possible areas for improvement of the interaction of the ECE Department with its constituencies.
Although students will develop a better understanding of the strengths and weaknesses of their undergraduate program after they start their careers, they are generally aware of the technical skills they will need to succeed. The ECE Department has established a policy that encourages students to discuss their suggestions and concerns with faculty members and the Director of the Department, with the understanding that changes can be made when appropriately justified. The ECE Undergraduate Student Council was formed during the Spring 2002 semester to provide a means of obtaining the “sense of the student body” regarding the ECE program. The survey (see Appendix I-G.6) developed, distributed, and analyzed by the Student Council during the Spring 2003 semester provided important information regarding student concerns to the Department.
Students returning from Co-op internships have provided useful input to the ECE Department’s planning activities. Since a large number of ECE students participate in the Co-op program, approaches to more systematically draw on their experiences are under consideration. The results of a formal survey (see Appendix I-G.6) completed by Co-op students are discussed later.
Department interaction with its alumni is not as well developed as desired. SEAC managed the distribution of questionnaires (see Appendix I-G.2) to recent alumni to solicit their feedback on various aspects of the engineering programs at Stevens. Unfortunately, the response rate was quite low. This is not unexpected and a more direct mechanism to engage our alumni to work with the department and its students will be necessary. Such engagements extend to serving as a network to assist our graduating students in their search for a job, particularly given the difficult situation they presently face. Although a standard “Department Newsletter” is one mechanism (not presently used), today’s technologies suggest a more dynamic medium for communicating with alumni, namely a multimedia CD. During the 2003-2004 academic year, the ECE faculty in collaboration with its Undergraduate Student Council, will develop a multimedia overview of the department for distribution to alumni. Questionnaires related to feedback to the department similar to, but improved from, what was sought in the Fall 02 and Spring 03 questionnaires emailed to alumni will be included with the distribution.

Table B2.4. ECE External Advisory BoardGabriel Akintayo Structured Networks InstituteAugustine Campos-Marquetti CitigroupKevin F. Cunniff Lucent Bell Labs (retired)Richard Frenkiel Rutgers University, WINLABWilliam Gewirtz VP and CTO AT&T (Retired)David Goodman Polytechnic University Dept Electrical EngineeringFabrizio Lombardi Northeastern University Chair: Dept ECETaufy Mazzawy I-BMRichard S. Muller Univ. California Berkeley Dept Electrical EngineeringDerek Morris Rutgers University Dept Computer ScienceSubir Ray Princeton Global CapitalStuart C. Schwartz Princeton University Dept Electrical EngineeringJerry M. Wigdortz ConsultantRalph W. Wyndrum, Jr. AT&T (Retired)

The primary regular contact of the ECE Department with employers of our students is through the recruiters who visit campus for the various job fairs. The Director of the ECE Department routinely meets with some of the visiting recruiters to solicit concerns regarding the preparation of the ECE students for career positions. The recruiters have a relatively good sense of what causes one student to stand out above another, including not only grades but also participation in student groups, athletics, etc. In addition, by interviewing large numbers of students on a multiplicity of campuses, their perspectives are perhaps better matched to assessment of a disciplinary program than the supervisor of an individual graduate. Some of the adjustments to the ECE programs over the past few years have been stimulated in part by this input from campus recruiters. Another connection to employers is through companies participating in the Co-op internship program. These companies typically see a number of students over a period of time and can provide an assessment (e.g., using the SEAC survey - see Appendix I-G.4) based on the skill-sets of the students seen.
Students graduating over the past couple of years have encountered far greater difficulties obtaining job interviews and job offers than seen by earlier graduating classes. The ECE Department will need to adopt a more proactive position in assisting its students in their search for jobs. The multimedia-based Departmental Newsletter discussed above will be considered for distribution to individuals in companies to serve as a “marketing” mechanism for our students. Employers who have had the chance to witness our students in engineering activities (e.g., at the senior design fair when capstone projects are exhibited) have been very favorably impressed with the accomplishments of the students. The ECE Department will explore this mechanism to market its students during the Fall 2003, with the objective of distributing a compelling view of students during the hiring season.
Feedback from the External Advisory Board is provided both through meetings and through electronic interactions (email, etc.). Given the significant size of the Advisory Board, it has been difficult to arrange times when the majority of members can be present. For example, the August 2001 meeting (Appendix I-G.1), to maximize representation, was divided into two separate meetings to address scheduling conflicts restricting attendance by the board members. In August, 2002, the ECE Department provided its External Advisory Board with an electronic overview (Appendix I-G.1) of the status of the department, including actions and successes related to some of the issues raised during the August 2001 meeting. A meeting will be scheduled with the Advisory Board shortly after the start of the Fall 2003 semester.
Gabriel Akintayo and Augustine Campos-Marquetti were added to the Advisory Board during the Spring 2003 semester. Mr. Akintayo delivers a variety of training courses related to networks and computer operating systems at various universities and through Structured Network Institute. He has delivered to the ECE Department a significant physical network infrastructure on which the Department will be able to provide important hands-on projects using a real, non-trivial local area network. Mr. Campos-Marquetti has been involved with the internal education program, taken by several ECE Department students while serving as interns, at Citigroup. These new members were added to strengthen the representation on the Advisory Board of professionals directly involved in the development and delivery of educational programs (outside of the academic environment) suitable for undergraduates. They join a group roughly balanced between academic professionals and industry professionals, including two members of the Stevens’ Board of Trustees. The Advisory Board serves both the EE and the CpE programs of the ECE Department, and includes a roughly balanced representation of professionals with expertise in these fields.
B2.3 Processes to Develop Program Objectives
B2.3.1 School of Engineering Processes
Following the previous ABET evaluation of the programs of the Charles V. Schaefer Jr. School of Engineering, an interdepartmental faculty committee was formed to develop an assessment system that
was consistent with the educational philosophy of the strong engineering core curriculum, a tradition at Stevens since its founding, and
would establish a framework and processes in preparation for the next ABET evaluation.
Upon the introduction of the ABET EC2000 criteria, this committee was renamed the “School of Engineering Education and Assessment Committee” (SoE-EAC).
In meeting its charge, SoE-EAC adopted an approach that consisted of defining broadly based statements of desired goals of the School of Engineering and its associated curriculum outcomes. This process led to the definition of educational program objectives for each program according to the following steps:
1. A review of the Institute and School of Engineering mission statements.
2. A review of published studies from the engineering community and Stevens' Strategic Plan.
3. A review of the ABET EC2000 criteria along with the terminology and definitions (e.g. program objectives and outcomes).
4. Development of a few broad objectives (in draft form) for each program, linked to the program and school of engineering mission statements.
5. The identification of strategies and actions, (i.e. preliminary assessment process) that described how the program objective could be achieved
6. The identification of preliminary outcomes related to program objectives and processes to assess the program objectives.
B2.3.2. Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering Processes
The overall process for definition of CpE program objectives followed closely the infrastructure (e.g., SEAC) established in the School of Engineering and noted above. Two ECE faculty members (Prof. U. Tureli representing the EE program and Prof. K.P. Subbalakshmi representing the CpE program) served on SEAC. These representatives submitted ECE-related material to SEAC for review. In addition, they provided the ECE Department with feedback from SEAC and with information on activities to be completed. This process was well underway by the start of 2000, including the ECE Director attending an ABET 2000 workshop.
An “ABET” web site was established at the start of the process to provide the ECE faculty with the information they needed to participate fully in the ABET related activities defined by SEAC. This Web site served as a record of ECE activities as the ABET 2000 activities evolved. Concurrently, SEAC deployed a School-wide Web site allowing each program to view the objectives, outcomes, and other ABET-related material being developed by other SoE programs.
These CpE program objectives were published in the Stevens 2001-2002 Undergraduate Catalog and were continued in the 2002-2003 Undergraduate Catalog. The primary external review of the initial published CpE program objectives was accomplished through the ECE External Advisory Board at its meeting in August 2001. At that time, the External Advisory Board voiced no concerns regarding the objectives as stated. However, they did discuss a variety of other issues (e.g., the large size of some classes, the small size of the ECE faculty at that time, the extent to which the SOE core curriculum limited the number of program-specific courses, and the range of technical electives available to the undergraduates). These other issues are discussed elsewhere in this report.
In the process of preparing this Self-Study, the statements of the CpE program objectives were reconsidered. Although the objectives were appropriate for the CpE discipline, it was felt that some of the objectives articulated excessive detail and that the statements of the objectives might be misinterpreted as outcomes rather than objectives. While maintaining the themes of the original objectives, they were reformulated, reducing the number, eliminating the excessive detail, and distinguishing them more clearly from outcomes. The revisions were completed in preparation for the 2003-2004 Stevens’ Catalog updates.
B2.3.3 Involvement of Program Constituencies in Development and Review of Program Objectives
The process leading to the initial development of the CpE program objectives was described in the preceding section. Internal reviews by SEAC led to several generations of the initial draft. In addition, benchmarking with other universities that had prepared program objectives for their CpE programs provided examples of representative lists of objectives from those universities. Informal discussions were held with some of the industry recruiters who visit Stevens regularly during Stevens-sponsored job fairs but these discussions typically led to issues related to program outcomes. The program objectives were reviewed at various times by the ECE faculty and the issue of whether the objectives were excessively detailed arose during the 2002-2003 academic year during department meetings.
SEAC provided a mechanism to survey typical constituencies of its engineering programs, including recent alumni, employers of coop students, and employers of graduates. Data from these surveys performed during the Fall 02 semester did not provide specific indications that the objectives needed to be changed. Similarly, the surveys performed during the Spring 03 semester did not suggest changes in the objectives.
The changes made to the program objectives shortly after the end of the Spring 2003 semester in preparation for the publication of the 2003-2004 Stevens Catalog reflect not so much a change in the CpE program objectives but rather a more succinct statement of those objectives. In this sense, the underlying CpE program objectives have not changed, just the statements of those objectives.
Further information regarding specific involvement of the program constituencies in the evaluation of the achievement of the program objectives is presented later in Section B2.5.
B2.4 Curriculum and Processes to Ensure Achievement of Objectives
B2.4.1 Curriculum and Processes at the School of Engineering Level
A distinguishing feature of the Stevens education is the extensive core curriculum, a tradition since the founding of the Institute in 1871. At the heart of core curriculum is an eight-semester design sequence known as the Design Spine. The core also features an eight-semester Humanities requirement. The core curriculum contributes in some way to most outcomes needed to achieve Program Objectives and is a key factor in some.
Recent Major Curriculum Revision
In 1998 the Stevens faculty started implementation of a revised engineering curriculum to build upon the experience with the previous curriculum’s Design Thread (which comprised a core design course in each of the Freshman, Sophomore and Junior years), to strengthen the core sequence and to provide better alignment with ABET 2000 Criteria. The revision had its origins in an Institute-wide strategic planning activity that, for the Engineering Curriculum, reaffirmed the core values associated with the Stevens tradition of a large, broad-based core while allowing for accreditation in various engineering disciplines.
Curriculum Development Process
The curriculum revision was a result of several years of development that involved definition of educational goals and objectives, competencies based on the goals and the articulation of these into the curriculum. This process involved a number of faculty committees and also sought contributions from outside experts and alumni from industry, academe and government through individual discussions and round tables. Benchmarking of curriculum development activities at other institutions was also undertaken, particularly in the areas of design and integration. Meetings were held with groups of junior and senior undergraduates to seek input. A survey of employers of recent graduates and a subsequent larger survey of recent graduates and their immediate supervisors were conducted by Prof. Peter Koen of the School of Technology Management and addressed the perceived competencies of these alumni. The results were consistent with those from other surveys and reports in indicating that graduates generally met expectations in the technical competencies. However, there was a need for further enhancement of competencies in the “soft” areas such as problem solving, teaming, communication skills and project management, competencies that can be addressed as part of design education.



B2.4.1.3 The Design Spine

As a result of the development activities described above, a cornerstone of the revised curriculum is a further strengthened design sequence forming a Design Spine running through all eight semesters. Associated with the development of the Design Spine is a greater integration of design with the science and engineering science courses, in many cases with courses taken concurrently.
A schematic representation of the Design Spine and its relations to other components of the curriculum appears Figure B2.1. Within each box representing a design course is shown, in italics, the engineering science course(s) with which the design course is integrated. At the center are shown the key competencies that are developed throughout the design sequence.
The Spine consists of five core design courses (Semesters 1 through 5). The first four design courses are structured such that students are exposed in some way during their first two years to design issues associated with each of the main engineering disciplines.
There are three disciplinary design courses (Semesters 6-8) that are associated with the technical elective courses for the student's concentration in a particular Program.
The details of the design spine courses and coupling to the co-requisite engineering science courses are given in Section B4.

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Figure B2.1. Schematic of the School of Engineering Curriculum

B2.4.2 Curriculum and Processes at the Computer Engineering Program Level
Computer engineering has been evolving rapidly as an engineering topic over the past decade, with applications of computer engineering extending into an increasing number of products and services. Microprocessors and other computational components have become low cost, commodity items and are inserted into an ever widening range of products. Algorithms providing the “intelligence” enabled by the cheap but powerful computational hardware have increased in complexity and sophistication, demanding that the computer engineer be familiar with a broadening range of quantitative concepts connected only weakly to classical calculus. Just as computer data is increasingly moving into the data network infrastructure, so also are the computer engineers. Increasingly, computer engineers are called upon to manage not single computers but rather networked systems of computers, with responsibilities not only for the computers but also for the networks connecting them. Traditional computer data is increasingly multimedia data, with its many subtleties. These are just a few of the current trends that make computer engineering an exciting field. At the same time, the same trends impose significant educational challenges on those developing, evolving, and delivering educational programs in computer engineering.
The ECE department is characterized by a large proportion of new faculty having been hired over the past four years and only two faculty members with experience preceding 1998 on the faculty. As new faculty members have taken responsibility for delivering the undergraduate computer engineering courses, they have been encouraged to review the previous course material and update the course material to better reflect principles through more contemporary applications. In addition, they have been encouraged to suggest new courses, both as core courses in the program and as technical electives. This dynamic environment provided by the new, young, and enthusiastic faculty has impacted virtually all of the CpE undergraduate courses. Over the past four years, the CpE curriculum has evolved substantially to address the new challenges. These overriding factors are mentioned because the field is changing rapidly and assessments related to satisfying objectives on the basis of those who have graduated earlier is difficult.
A second difficulty facing the CpE program at Stevens is the rapid rise in the student population over the past few years, following separation of the Computer Science program from what was earlier the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science. Until after the separation of the two programs and the formation of the current Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, the number of students in the computer engineering portion of then program was small. At the present time, the computer engineering program is one of the largest undergraduate programs at Stevens, and is about three times larger than the Department’s electrical engineering program. Although now a major program, there is not as a large community of alumni as one would otherwise expect given the current size of the program.
B2.4.2.1 Organization of ECE Department for Curriculum Development
Since many of the faculty members are involved in developing and delivering both EE and CpE courses (or ECE courses used by both programs), the department faculty collectively serve as a program committee for each program. Figure B2.2 shows the general organization of the ECE department for management of its overall program. Responsibility for the overall ECE program rests with the ECE Department Director. A program director serves to manage the details of each of the two programs - EE and CpE. Each of these two programs has a representative on the School of Engineering Education and Assessment Committee, through which joint decisions are made regarding changes in the core EE and CpE programs, including decisions related to whether a particular course approach is appropriate within the guidelines of the School of Engineering. The ECE Undergraduate Student Council has been charged with providing the Department with information regarding issues seen by students and with recommending changes in the program, instructor assignments, or any other issues regarded as impacting a significant portion of the student body.
The entire faculty serves as the program committee for each program, as illustrated in Figure B2.2. Recommendations for changes can be submitted by the Department Director, either of the Program Directors, SEAC, the ECE Undergraduate Council, or any individual faculty member. Over the past four years, this process has worked well.

Figure B2.2. Organization of ECE Department for Curriculum Decisions

B2.4.2.2 Curriculum to Achieve CpE Program Objectives
The overall strategic plan for development of the CpE program to achieve the program objectives has been to provide a set of core courses that provide the breadth to cover the several areas of computer engineering while adding technical electives suitable for achieving depth in specific topics that can be delivered by the faculty.
In 1996, the former Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS) was separated into two departments, the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE) in the School of Engineering and the Department of Computer Science (CS) in the School of Sciences and Arts. Prior to this separation, the EECS Department provided three distinct degrees - Electrical Engineering, Computer Engineering, and Computer Science. At that time, the Computer Engineering program was small relative to the other two programs of the EECS Department. After the split of the EECS Department, the Computer Engineering program drew almost exclusively on the Computer Science Department's set of courses. In fact, until 1999 there were no catalog courses (undergraduate or graduate) with a computer engineering designation (all courses in the ECE program were designated as "EE" courses and the courses listed in the CpE portion of the catalog which were not "EE" courses were listed as "CS" courses).
Since 1998, there has been a continuing evolution of the CpE program to correct weaknesses that had not been resolved at the time of the split of the former EECS department into separate departments. Also, since 1998, there has been a very substantial growth in the size of the CpE program, with the student enrollments increasing as shown in the data in Section A.5. This section summarizes the major stages of this program evolution. This information is presented as part of this Section of the ABET Self Study mainly due to the substantial changes in the CpE program driven by factors separate from formal assessments and feedback. There were deficiencies that were clearly in need of correction, including
the need to adjust the content of several courses used by CpE/CS students to better match the needs of those student groups;
the need to create versions of courses offered by the CS Department and used by CpE students to create engineering-specific courses in the topical area of the CS courses being used;
the need to add courses in topics of importance that were not covered in the existing curriculum; and
the need to integrate project-based learning into several of our courses.
The core CpE curriculum was substantially changed over the past few years. Remaining from the earlier CpE curriculum with modest changes are CpE 358 (Switching Theory and Logic Design), CpE 390 (Microprocessor Systems). Two other core courses were substantially redeveloped. CpE 487 (Digital Systems Design) was upgraded to provide students with an understanding of hardware description languages (VHDL) as an integral means of designing highly complex circuits. During the 2002-2003 academic year, FPGA (field programmable gate array) laboratory boards were introduced and used by several students. During the 2003-2004 academic year, the “hands-on” portion of this course will increase. EE 471 (Transport Phenomena) was also substantially upgraded, providing increased depth in the underlying physics for electrical engineering majors and providing content on CMOS logic for he computer engineering majors. EE471 continues to serve as a core ECE course for both EE and CpE students. Development of a distinctive “transport” course for the computer engineering program has been under discussion.
Recently introduced new core CpE courses include the following:
CpE 360 (Computational Data Structures and Algorithms), replacing the CS384 (Analysis of Algorithms) course previously used.
CpE 490 (Information Systems Engineering I), introducing the student to LAN networks including programming of simple client-server applications.
CpE 462 (Introduction to Image Processing and Coding), providing students with an understanding of digital signal processing from the perspective of images rather than sophisticated models of analog signals.
Ma 334 (Discrete Mathematics), providing students with an understanding of the mathematical principles underlying many of the programming principles that need to be used by a computer engineer.
A significant number of new technical elective courses have also been placed in the program. These include an advanced course on information systems, a contemporary topics course, a bachelor’s with thesis option, and a significant number of new lower-level graduate courses in information systems, networked systems security, multimedia technologies, and others.
New laboratory facilities have been acquired to support the computer engineering program. One resource that is expected to have a significant impact is a LAN network laboratory, established in collaboration with a local company (Structured Networks Institute) providing consulting services and also educational programs (e.g., certification training) at several area universities.
All these actions are intended to serve the purpose of better satisfying the CpE program objectives to produce graduates who can work effectively and creatively in the fast changing field of computer engineering.
B2.5 System of Ongoing Evaluation that Demonstrates Achievement of Objectives
B2.5.1 School of Engineering System for Ongoing Evaluation
The two methods deployed during the 2002-2003 academic year for assessment of objectives were surveys through which the opinions of alumni and employers of alumni, and alumni could be expressed. The alumni employer survey was conducted for the School of Engineering as a whole, and not for individual programs. Program specific employer surveys will be deployed during the 2003-2004 academic year. The survey questions for alumni related to the objectives of the program from which they graduated. Direct methods measuring the actual performance of recent graduates will be developed and deployed during the 2003-2004 academic year.
The procedure developed for assessment of program objectives from these surveys is shown in Figure B2.3 (other sources of feedback regarding achievement of objectives are not included in this figure but the overall process is similar for those other sources) and contains the following steps:

A. Collection of information: using
the Alumni Survey and
the Employer Survey
B. Tabulation of the results of the assessments in terms of objectives, including which objectives need to be further developed for achievement.
C. Review of the results of B by the Program Committee for each objective (presently for School objectives using the Employer and Alumni Surveys and the Program objectives for the Alumni Survey) to determine changes needed in the program, the objectives and/or the assessment procedure.
D. Review of the conclusions of the Program Committee with the rest of the Program Faculty and with the Program’s Visiting Committee to establish appropriate actions.
E. Implementation of the selected actions.

The first alumni survey, conducted via the Web in the winter of 2002 invited all graduates of the program to participate. A second survey was conducted, again via the Web, during the spring of 2003 and targeted only those program alumni who had graduated since 1995. In the future, the survey will be conducted every few years, targeting students who will have graduated within about four years of the survey. This conforms to the definition of objectives as applying to graduates who have been in the workplace for a moderate amount of time.
B2.5.2 Computer Engineering System for Ongoing Evaluation
The ECE Department has adopted the process for evaluation of the achievement of objectives that was developed by SEAC and discussed above in Section B2.5.1. The surveys discussed there were supplemented by other sources of information. CpE specific information on assessment of the achievement of objectives is provided here.



Figure B2.3. SoE Objectives Assessment Process


B2.5.2.1 Alumni Survey
SEAC conducted a survey of alumni from its various degree programs following the Fall 2002 semester and the Spring 2003 semester. At the time of writing of this report, only the Fall 2002 survey results were available. Results of the more recent survey will be available for the ABET visit.
The sparse response (30 respondents total) to the CpE Alumni Questionnaires raises questions whether the responses obtained are representative of what would have been obtained had a larger portion of the questionnaires been returned. As noted earlier (Section B2.2), the ECE Department will be exploring means of obtaining a stronger level of feedback from its graduates. Of the 30 respondents, most had graduated within the last three years, providing appropriate input for evaluation of the achievement of objectives. In fact, the vast majority of graduated computer engineering students have graduated over the past 5 years.
The questions in the CpE Alumni Survey and the alumni response data are shown in Appendix I-G.2. The three primary weaknesses in the CpE program indicated by the alumni responses are
computer/data networking was inadequate (33% of respondents),
software laboratories were ineffective (25% of respondents) and
computer-based component was inadequate (25%of respondents).
With the CpE program having changed rapidly over the past few years to address these issues, it is likely that the graduates responding to the survey did not have the opportunity to take the present course sequences.
B2.5.2.2 Employer Feedback
As noted above, no program-specific employer surveys were performed. Program specific feedback regarding the CpE program has therefore been limited to other mechanisms. In the future, the CpE alumni will be sent a newsletter, including a questionnaire through which they can provide feedback (e.g., using a self-addressed/stamped envelop to make return of the questionnaire easy).
Stevens Institute of Technology manages a number of “job fairs” throughout the academic year, bringing to campus representatives from several companies. Recruiters from those companies seeking CpE students have held informal discussions with the Director of the ECE Department through a variety of channels - visiting the ECE office, sending emails with specific requests or suggestions, calling to discuss their needs or meetings at job fairs and other events. Overall, these recruiters strongly endorse the combination of the SOE Core Curriculum and the CpE specific courses as having been effective in producing graduates with strong skills in engineering, including but not limited to interdisciplinary engineering. Overall, the feedback regarding CpE graduates who were hired previously is quite favorable. One example of this positive view of the CpE graduate was provided by a recruiter from Microsoft (in Seattle) who travels routinely to Stevens Job Fairs because she has found the ECE graduates to have been better prepared for their jobs than those at many other universities.
Other forms of anecdotal feedback were provided during discussions with representatives of companies and with members of the ECE External Advisory Board (speaking about their own company’s hiring needs and expectation). Employer feedback is also provided informally by earlier alumni with considerable job experience. The underlying desires for employees with a strong work ethic, an ability to work effectively in teams, an ability to attack complex designs within a fast-changing market using advanced components, and strong communication skills for effective interactions with colleagues and customers are common themes.
Feedback from employers exhibits a favorable view of CpE students. The work ethic of the CpE graduates is generally regarded as a strength of the graduates. The broad-based engineering education is often cited as a positive characteristic of Stevens CpE graduates compared to graduates of other universities, as in statements such as “the most important characteristic is an ability to think problems through effectively and correctly.” There appears to be some variation in the comments made regarding the ability of CpE students to work effectively in teams (usually favorable but some unfavorable assessments were seen). In addition, CpE graduates are generally viewed as being very adaptive to changes in their assignments and adept at learning new skills as needed.
Weaknesses cited are generally related to two themes. The first is the limited ability of many CpE graduates to program in a high-level language. The second is the limited exposure of many CpE graduates to important software environments (e.g., SQL database environments, operating systems, etc.). Actions have already been established to systematically address the problem of programming among CpE students who have not learned programming skills on their own. The issue of providing students with “training” in the use of sophisticated software tools is under consideration, with preliminary plans to establish “modular short courses” to provide a mixture of practice and principles in targeted areas.
B2.5.2.3 External Advisory Board
Overall, the External Advisory Board at its meeting in August 2001 were satisfied with the objectives that had been developed. Minor restatements of the CpE program objectives were made at the end of the Spring 03 semester. The CpE program objectives at the time of that meeting were as follows.

CpE Program Objectives through Spring 03 semester.
1. The graduate will understand the basic principles and practices of analog electronic circuits and signals, including mathematical techniques used for modeling and analysis.
2. The graduate will be proficient in the design techniques and physical technologies of complex digital circuits, including microprocessor-based systems and their applications.
3. The graduate will be proficient in the mathematical techniques used to represent, analyze and manipulate signals in the digital domain (sampled, discrete amplitude) and in the application of digital signal processors for digital signal processing applications.
4. The graduate will be experienced in significant individual and team-based projects demonstrating the application of formal elements, software engineering principles, and software development environments to design, implementation, test and verify a significant software program.
5. The graduate will be proficient in data networks and in the development of software programs operating across data networks.
6. The graduate will be proficient in the principles of embedded systems design.
7. The graduate will be proficient in engineering design rooted in Technogenesis, i.e. cognizant of the challenges associated with carrying an idea from conception to prototyping.
8. The graduate will demonstrate compliance with professional ethics (for example, as stipulated in the IEEE Code of Ethics).
9. The graduate will be proficient in the use of communications (oral presentations and written reports) to articulate their ideas effectively.
10. The concurrent exposure to humanities and social sciences will provide the graduate with a holistic understanding of societal needs and sensitivity to social concerns relative to technology.
11. The depth and breadth of the educational background will prepare the graduates for leadership roles in their career paths. The graduate will also be prepared for the continuing learning and self-improvement necessary for a long-term career in computer engineering. 
There was some discussion whether the emphasis on analog electronic in CpE objectives 1 was appropriate. However, the reality that today’s digital circuit design requires an understanding of the analog nature of signals and circuits when high speed operation occurs was felt to justify this emphasis. The use of the terminology "circuits and systems" was felt to cover the extensions beyond basic electronic circuits, provided that the word "system" was understood by those reading the objectives.
CpE program objective 4 emphasizes the importance of graduates of the CpE program being proficient in at least one high-level software programming language. The discussions revolved mainly around the extent to which the CpE program were providing sufficient programming skills for its graduates, with the skill viewed as being essential by the majority of Board members. Actions to improve the exposure of our CpE students to programming applications has been a priority of the CpE program over the past three years.
CpE program objective 4 also emphasizes team-based laboratory projects. The importance of general design projects in the curriculum, outside the formality of a laboratory course, was noted. A number of courses have added team-based projects (Project-Based Learning) to their activities.
Objectives 5 and 6 were viewed as being important new themes for computer engineering students, not always covered adequately by other CpE progams.
Also supported by the External ECE Advisory Board was the emphasis on development of communications skills. It was noted that communication skills extend beyond formal presentations to day-to-day communications with colleagues regarding technical topics.
Comments related to the EE/CpE status report distributed to the members of the External Advisory Board in August 2002 reflected the rapid recent growth of the ECE Department’s programs, noting significant improvements in several of the underlying weaknesses that were reported during the August 2001 meeting. The development of the graduate certificate programs, including their on-line delivery, was received favorably, including the realignment of the 500-level ECE graduate courses to allow qualified students to use these courses as technical electives. No significant deficiencies in the CpE program were noted by the Board members.
B2.6 Results Used to Improve Effectiveness of the Program
B2.6.1 School of Engineering System
A major change to the core curriculum was approved in April 2003 in response to data collected by the Dean of Undergraduate Academics that showed that approximately 30% of all freshmen students were not completing all the credits for which they were enrolled in their first semester at Stevens. The effect of this was to cause some students to elect a reduced-load, 5-year program or to attempt a heavier than normal course load in later semesters (potentially compromising their grade point average). To address the problem, a focus group considered how to reduce the course load during the first semester. The student’s first semester includes a large amount of scheduled class time (25 hours/week) to complete the large number (8) of separately scheduled courses. From these considerations, a variety of changes to the core SoE curriculum were established for the Fall 2003 semester.
The E101 Engineering Seminar of the Freshman semester was eliminated as a regular class. It had consistently received poor evaluations from students. However, the students found some of the content to be valuable. This content will be migrated to the E121 Engineering Design I course and by scheduled meetings of students with faculty advisors. A second change in the Freshman semester to replacement of the programming course CS 115 (previously delivered by the Computer Science Department) with a new course, E115 Introduction to Computer programming. E115 will have less contact hours, compensated by delivering a more focused preparation in and its applications in an engineering context. E115 will be strongly linked to E121, where students will apply their programming skills to program a microprocessor-controlled robot. These changes reduce, for the Freshman semester, the number of courses by one, the contact hours by 1.5 and the credits by one. There is ongoing discussion regarding students completing the Freshman year’s Humanities course during the intersession break to provide an additional reduction in course load during either the first or the second semester.
T he existing 4-credit E234 Thermodynamics and Energy Conversion course in the third semester was changed to a 3-credit course, with the 4th credit provided to programs for disciplinary coverage of the themes of E234. In addition the SoE core Physics sequence was changed from four 2.5-credit courses to three 3-credit courses, removing the physics course previously given during the 4th semester.
Through such changers, the course load confronted by incoming students during their first few semesters has been reduced, with the expectation that students will demonstrate improved performance in the courses taken. All of the above changes to the core curriculum were approved by the entire SOE faculty, after initial approval by the SOE Education and Assessment Committee.
B2.6.2 Computer Engineering Program
Feedback provided by the surveys of alumni and of employers, as well as informal feedback obtained from recruiters, colleagues in industry, and other sources provides one force driving changes in the ECE curriculum. The substantial number of new faculty members in the Department are themselves a powerful driver of change, bringing to Stevens their experiences at other competitive universities. Below, an overview of the status of achieving the CpE objectives is combined with examples of significant changes impacting the overall program.
Objective #1:
“Graduates will understand the underlying principles and practices of digital circuits and systems, including design techniques, engineering design tools, mathematical methods, and physical technologies.”
A significant number of initiatives have addressed the development of more effective approaches to achieve this fundamental objective for the CpE graduates. They include new facilities and resources through which skills in contemporary systems can be developed, new core courses reflecting recent changes in the careers that will be followed by most of our CpE graduates, and technical electives providing opportunities to explore topics in new ways. These various initiatives are summarized below.
Digital Network Testbed
As data networks have become increasingly ubiquitous, the role of electrical engineers in this important area has also become increasingly. Although principles related to data networks can be presented in lectures, the lack of real engineering experiences with these networks is a serious limitation. A new physical local area network has been deployed for use in education, serving as a laboratory infrastructure where students can gain hands-on experiences. The digital network testbed summarized below is merely the beginning of what will certainly be a continuing theme of providing students with increased access to complex computer/network systems with which they can “play.”
Through a cooperative agreement between the ECE Department and Gabriel Akintayo (with Structured Networks Institute, a local consulting and training company), a significant collection of network components (routers, switches, hubs, firewalls, etc.) has been added to the ECE Department’s Microsystems Laboratory. This undergraduate laboratory presently supports the Department’s CpE 390 Microprocessor Systems laboratory component and will be expanded to include other laboratory project resources for the Fall 2003 semester (see below). Mr Akintayo, a member of the ECE External Advisory Board, will be working with the Department to integrate this network laboratory into our undergraduate (and, where appropriate, graduate) program.
Advanced Electronic Systems Lab
With complex electronic systems and subsystems playing a large role in electrical engineering, the need to provide students with an opportunity to work with contemporary, high performance systems is of clear importance. The ECE Department is taking steps to move beyond the traditional approach of basic electronics laboratories for teaching to establish a substantial electronic systems facility with high-end special-purpose commercial hardware systems allowing students to “embed” various ideas and applications in a contemporary system-evaluation facility. The Advanced Electronic Systems Lab (an informal name associated with the equipment expected) is an important initiative in this direction.
Prof. Bruce McNair, a Distinguished Service Professor recently retired from AT&T Laboratories, is seeking the donation of his laboratory equipment and instrumentation to the ECE Department. It is expected that a substantial amount of this equipment (including commercial parallel DSP systems and other systems) will be provided during the 2003 summer session. These facilities will provide a substantial opportunity for undergraduate students to complete significant projects based on hardware systems (for example as part of the Bachelor’s in Engineering with Thesis option added to the CpE curriculum during the 2002-2003 academic year).
Changes in Core CpE Curriculum
CpE 360 (Spring 2003 semester): The CS course (CS 384) in "data structures and algorithms" was a required course, providing the CpE student with an understanding of data structures and algorithms from the perspective of programming applications and program design. However, CS 384 did not provide backgrounds in the types of applications commonly encountered by CpE graduates. Representative CpE-specific applications include numerical analysis, simulation, modeling, etc. In 2002 , the ECE Department introduced a CpE specific course in data structures and algorithms (CpE 360: Computational Data Structures and Algorithms) to correct this deficiency. It was recognized that some CpE students, particularly those primarily interested in programming-related careers, might prefer the earlier CS 384 course as an alternative to the new CpE 360 course. This option is available, with approval by the student's faculty advisor.
CpE 490: Information Systems Engineering I. CpE 490 was introduced as a required Term V CpE course, providing depth in the principles of data networking while at the same time requiring that students successfully complete homework and projects related to client-server programming. CpE 490 has emerged as one of the courses through which we advance the students' abilities in programming. This course addresses the needs of the substantial number of our CpE students planning on careers in the general area of networked systems.
Ma 334: Discrete Mathematics. The ABET Criteria for Electrical and Computer Engineering emphasize the importance of discrete math as a part of the curriculum for Computer Engineering. Upon reviewing its set of required courses, it was decided that this requirement would be satisfied on the basis of related content provided in the required CpE courses such as CpE 358 (Switching Theory and Logic Design) and CpE 390 (Microprocessor Systems). However, these courses do not present the full range of discrete math topics providing the student with the skills in quantitative reasoning related to design of programs, modeling/simulation of systems driven reasoning skills separate from mathematical analysis, and development of algorithms reflecting graph theoretical concepts. For this reason, at the start of the Spring 2003 semester, approval was obtained from the School of Engineering to readjust the engineering core math sequence to allow addition of the discrete math course delivered by the Math Department for the Computer Science program. In particular, approval was granted to replace an existing technical elective slot with the existing fourth SoE core Ma 227 course (Multivariate Calculus) and to require CpE students to complete Ma 334 (discrete math) during Term IV. Students have the option of deferring completion of the existing Ma 227 course until their junior year.
Approval for this change was obtained just prior to the start of the Spring 03 semester and efforts to establish a separate section of Ma 334 for the CpE students were unsuccessful due to conflicts with other courses. However, CpE students were able to enroll in one of the existing Spring 03 sections of Ma 334 (limited only by the enrollment caps on the sections of Ma 334). Full deployment of the discrete math course for CpE sophomores will be completed for the Fall 03 semester.
Changes in CpE Electives
Industry recruiters and other sources commented on the need for the program to provide students with two experiences of direct importance to the student’s careers. One related to the need to expose students to contemporary topics. The second was to provide qualified students with an opportunity to pursue significant individual projects under the guidance of a full-time faculty member. Similar suggestions were made by undergraduates including the ECE Undergraduate Student Council. Both experiences are central to achieving objective 2, but also impact realization of other objectives such as objective 4 and, depending on the specific topic involved, objective 1. In response to these suggestions, the ECE Department added, at the start of the 2002-2003 academic year, the following two new courses to its set of undergraduate electives (Similarly numbered course were added at the same time to the computer engineering program).
EE 440: Current Topics in Electrical and Computer Engineering.
This course presents a topic of current interest (e.g., wireless networks provided the theme during the 2002-2003 semester) and covers technical principles and practices related to topic selected (e.g., current and next generation wireless networks).
EE 485-486: Research in Electrical Engineering I-II.
EE 485 (Fall semester) and 486 (Spring semester) is a two semester sequence during which the student completes a thesis, under the supervision of an EE faculty member. During its first offering in the 2002-2003 academic year, some weaknesses appeared, largely in the definition and management of the student’s activities. These will be corrected for the 2003-2004 offering.
Objective #2:
“Graduates will participate effectively in team-based approaches to design, verification, and realization tasks.”
A new faculty member with extensive industry experience was hired at the start of the 2002-2003 AY to manage and develop the capstone engineering project program. Prof. Bruce McNair, a Distinguished Service Professor, has been effective in providing students with general guidance as well as establishing a more effective framework for execution of the projects.
Objective #3:
“Graduates will be proficient in the systematic exploration of the design space to achieve optimized designs.”
The ECE Department is developing new resources enabling students to complete more aggressive projects using contemporary components and packaging technologies.


Electronic Systems Prototyping Resources
Students receive substantial coverage of the physical sciences and engineering fields as part of their SoE core curriculum. Laboratory components accompany some of these core science and engineering courses. However, the connection between the physical principles and innovative devices such as microelectronic sensors is not strong. This may be the result of an inadequately developed infrastructure for student completion of projects (formal lab or course-based) in which they can experiment with novel devices and components to better understand their behaviors. Equipment and instrumentation has been acquired by the ECE Department and the School of Engineering that is expected to have a major impact on the opportunities for electrical engineering students to “play” with contemporary devices and components.
This equipment includes a 4-layer PCB (printed circuit board) prototyping system supporting plated through holes and capable not only of rigid RF circuit boards and high-speed analog/digital circuit boards but also specialized boards such as flexible boards. Also included is equipment to mount components, ranging from simple discrete components and low pin count packages through mounting of very high pin count (hundreds of pins) packages on the circuit board. A full complement of tools, along with specialized test instruments ranging from oscilloscopes through spectrum analyzers and logic analyzers, was also acquired. This equipment and instrumentation will be activated during the 2003 summer session, becoming available to students in the Fall 2003 semester.
These resources will be integrated into the CpE program to provide graduates with underlying skills related to the combination of design and implementation stages to complete a contemporary digital system design.
Objective #4:
“Graduates will demonstrate compliance with professional ethics (for example, as stipulated in the IEEE Code of Ethics).”
Stevens students are bound by an Honor Code in the completion of their homeworks, tests, and projects. Student violations related to plagiarism have become increasingly common. The ECE Department has adopted a policy expecting professional behavior with regard to the submission of a student’s assignment and has been aggressive in reporting apparent violations of the Honor Code to the Honor Board for review and, when appropriate, disciplinary action.
Objective #5:
“Graduates will be proficient in the use of communications (oral presentations and written reports) to articulate their ideas effectively.”
There has been an increasing expectation regarding the quality of oral presentations, in large part due to the sophistication of presentation design software such as PowerPoint. EE students demonstrate maturity in their oral presentations. No specific actions are seen needed in this area. Writing skills are quite varied among students. No specific plans within the EE program, aside from the increased number of written reports required for the additional class projects that have been introduced in several courses.
Objective #6:
“Graduates will be prepared for the continuing learning and self-improvement necessary for a productive career in computer engineering.”
The era when engineers joined a company expecting to spend an entire career with that company has ended, with layoffs and relocations a standard situation confronting today’s engineers. Students are well aware of this situation and appear to understand the need for the flexibility provided by continued learning and self-improvement. No specific actions are planned relative to this objective.
Objective #7:
“Graduates will play leadership roles in their professions..”
No initiatives specifically targeting this objective are planned at this time.


B3 Program Outcomes and Assessment
B3.1 Definitions Related to Outcomes and Assessment Process
Curricula in the Charles V. Schaefer School of Engineering are based on the integration of a broad engineering core curriculum that ensures breadth in the sciences, engineering and the humanities with a discipline-specific core providing depth in the discipline. A common organization of core courses in the common engineering program, discipline-specific core program and course outcomes is provided. On this basis, we have developed a three-level hierarchy from the SoE level to the program level to the course level as illustrated in Table B3.1.
Table B3.1 Stevens Assessment Terminology
ABETSchool of Engineering (SoE)Program LevelCourse LevelCriterion 2
ABET ObjectivesSoE MissionProgram Mission and ObjectivesCriterion 3
ABET Outcomes (a-k)SoE Curriculum OutcomesProgram OutcomesSoE Curriculum Performance Criteria (CPC)

- Detailed outcomes for all programsProgram Performance Criteria (PPC)
- Subset of CPCs applicable to program
- Differentiates programsCourse Outcomes or Assessment Performance Criteria (APC)
-Course-specific description of PPCs
- Directly assessable
The terminology illustrated in Table B3.1 is based on the following definitions.
SoE Curriculum Outcomes relate to achievements of our graduates at the time of graduation and they ensure achievement of the SoE mission while meeting ABET Criterion 3 a-k for programs within SoE.
SoE Curriculum Performance Criteria (CPC) are measurable attributes related to each SOE Curriculum Outcome
Program Objectives are statements that describe the expected accomplishments of Stevens graduates during the first few years after graduation.
Program Outcomes are statements that describe what students are expected to know and are able to do by the time of graduation.
Program Performance Criteria are a sub-set of SoE Curriculum Performance Criteria (CPC) that are applicable to the individual program which distinguishes it from the other programs.
Course Assessment Performance Criteria (APC) also referred to as Course Outcomes are course specific outcomes related to Curriculum Performance Criteria and which are assessed directly within each course.


Figure B3.1. Hierarchical organization of outcome definitions and performance criteria.
B3.2 Hierarchical Organization of Outcomes and Assessment Criteria Definitions
Table B3.1 succinctly summarizes the overall hierarchy through which outcomes and criteria for programs and courses were developed. The details are most easily understood by considering the tree-based hierarchy directly. That hierarchy is shown in Figure B3.1. The top level of the hierarchy consists of thirteen broadly defined program outcomes. Most of these thirteen broadly defined outcomes have a one-to-one correspondence with a single ABET criterion.
The relations between the 13 SoE/CpE broad outcomes and the ABET 3 criteria (a-k) are shown in Table B3.2, where the statements of each of the 13 outcomes and the corresponding statements of the ABET criteria are given. Outcome 1 is related to two ABET criteria, namely a and e. As shown in Table B3.2, the association of Outcome 1 to a unique ABET criterion is provided by the statements (1A and 1B corresponding to criterion a and 1C corresponding to criterion e) at the middle level of the hierarchy. Outcome 5 is also related to two ABET criteria, namely c and h. As shown in Table B3.2, the third level of the hierarchy (Outcome 5A2) provides the unique connection to ABET criterion h, the other outcomes under outcome 5 being associated with ABET criterion e.
A completed three-tier hierarchy template was developed for use by all programs within the School of Engineering. Appendix I-E provides the full set of statements associated with all three levels of general three-level outcomes template.

Table B3.2. Relation of Program Outcomes to ABET Criteria
Broad OutcomesABET 3 CriteriaI. Broad Based Technical Expertise Outcomes 1A and 1BOutcome 1: (Scientific foundations) the ability to use applied scientific knowledge.
1A: When faced with a technical problem, the student will be able to identify and implement relevant principles of mathematics and computer science.
1 B: When faced with a technical problem, the student will be able to identify and implement relevant principles of physics and chemistry
ABET Criterion a: Ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science and engineering.aOutcome 1COutcome 1: (Engineering foundations) the ability to use applied scientific knowledge.
1 C: When faced with a technical problem, the student will be able to identify and implement relevant principles of engineering science.
ABET Criterion e: Ability to identify, formulate, and solve engineering problems.eOutcome 2Outcome 2: (Experimentation) the ability to design experiments, conduct experiments, and analyze experimental data.
ABET Criterion b: Ability to design and conduct experiments, as well as to analyze and interpret data.bOutcome 3Outcome 3: (Tools) an ability to use the relevant tools necessary for engineering practice.
ABET Criterion b: Ability to use the techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools necessary for engineering practice.kOutcome 4Outcome 4: (Technical design) the technical ability to design a prescribed engineering subsystem.
ABET Criterion c: Ability to design a system, component, or process to meet desired needs.cOutcome 5 (Not 5A2)Outcome 5: (Design assessment) The ability to develop and assess alternative system designs based on technical and non-technical criteria. (Not 5A2).
ABET Criterion c: Ability to design a system, component, or process to meet desired needs.cOutcome 5A2Outcome 5: (Design assessment) The ability to develop and assess alternative system designs based on technical and non-technical criteria. Students will be able to:
1 A: define overall needs and constraints. The students will be able to:
1A2: assess the social and environmental requirements of the system and its impact on the global society.
ABET Criterion h: Broad education necessary to understand the impact of engineering solutions in a global and societal context. hII. Professional Advancement and Communications Outcome 6Outcome 6: (Professionalism) the ability to recognize and achieve high levels of professionalism in their work.
ABET Criterion f: Understanding of professional and ethical responsibilities.fOutcome 7Outcome 7: (Leadership) an ability to assume leadership roles.
ABET Criterion d: Ability to function on multi-disciplinary teams.dOutcome 8Outcome 8: (Teamwork) the ability to function on teams
ABET Criterion d: Ability to function on multi-disciplinary teams.dOutcome 9Outcome 9: (Communication) the ability to communicate effectively and persuasively.
ABET Criterion g: Ability to communicate effectively.gIII. WorldView and Personal Development Outcome 10Outcome 10: (Ethics and morals) a critical understanding of ethical and moral systems in a social context.
ABET Criterion f: Understanding of professional and ethical responsibilities.fOutcome 11Outcome 11: (Diversity) an understanding and appreciation of diversity and pluralism.
ABET Criterion j: Knowledge of contemporary issues.jOutcome 12Outcome 12: (Lifelong learning) a recognition of the need for and an ability to engage in lifelong learning and development.
ABET Criterion i: Recognition of the need for, and an ability to engage in, life-long learning.iOutcome 13Outcome 13: (Entrepreneurship) have a fundamental knowledge and an appreciation of the technology and business processes necessary to nurture new technologies from concept to commercialization.
ABET Outcome: No corresponding ABET outcome.--
Each of the 13 top level outcomes is broadly stated. For example, Outcome 1 is stated as “SoE Outcome 1: (Scientific foundations) the ability to use applied scientific knowledge” in Table B3.2. Such a broadly stated outcome has several contributing components, each playing a significant role in achieving the intent of the outcome’s statement. For example, scientific knowledge includes the knowledge of the physical sciences (physics, chemistry, etc), of the mathematical (and computer) sciences, and of the engineering sciences, each of which is expected to contribute to the student’s strength in scientific knowledge. The second level of the hierarchy in Figure B3.1 specifies these constituent elements of each of the 13 top-level outcome. In the case of Outcome 1, the statements at the middle level of the hierarchy are as follows.
Outcome 1: (Scientific Foundations). The ability to use applied scientific knowledge.
1A. Mathematics and computer science. “When faced with a technical problem, the student will be able to identify and implement the relevant principles of mathematics and computer science.”
1B. Physics and chemistry. “The student will be able to apply relevant concepts of physics and chemistry.”
1C. Engineering science. “Both inside and outside their major, students will be able to apply the principles of engineering science”

The ECE Department has adopted this middle layer of the hierarchy as its set of program outcomes and apply those outcomes as program performance criteria (PPCs), as shown in Figure B3.1. As discussed in Appendix I-D, each program was charged with establishing program-specific statements of their program outcomes while preserving a connection between the course outcomes (Assessment Performance Criteria - APCs) and the curriculum performance criteria (CPCs) defined at the third level of the hierarchy in Figure B3.1. To serve as program-specific outcomes, CpE-specific statements corresponding to the spirit of each of the template’s middle layer statements were generated The full list of template statements for the outcomes hierarchy given in Appendix I-E includes the CpE program outcome statements corresponding to each of the template’s middle layer outcomes components. The third level of definition in the hierarchy template defines the Curriculum Performance Criteria (CPSs) associated with all engineering programs. Appendix I-D summarizes the process established by the SoE-EAC for development of the APCs (Assessment Performance Criteria) for each program course. Each such APC, stated to reflect the content of the course, was to be associated with a corresponding CPC. In this manner, the details of courses could be mapped according to a common foundation.
In the case of the CpE-specific courses, each APC is connected to its corresponding parent CpE program outcome which, in turn is connected to one of the 13 broad outcomes at the top level of the hierarchy. Assessment data for each CpE course could therefore be combined to establish a quantitative measure of the contributions of each CpE course to satisfying the program outcomes of each of the CpE outcomes (e.g., 1A, 1B, 1C, 2A, etc.). These quantitative measures of the achievement of the CpE outcomes can, in turn, be combined to establish a quantitative measure of the achievement of each of the 13 broad outcomes. The analysis of the full set data (student course evaluations and instructor assessments of student performance) for all required CpE courses, including the integration of the data to obtain assessments of the program outcomes and then assessments of the 13 broad outcomes were completed for both the Fall 02 and the Spring 03 semester. Having implemented this process, the same process of course assessment was completed for all ECE elective courses offered during the Fall 02 and Spring 03 semesters.
The full set of CpE program outcomes are listed below.

Detailed CpE Program Outcomes
Broad Outcome 1: (Scientific foundations) the ability to use applied scientific knowledge.
Outcome 1A: The student will be able to apply the principles of general mathematical and algorithmic thinking to the representation and solution of technical problems and be able to embed these principles in the design of electronic/optoelectronic components and systems.
Outcome 1B: The student will understand the underlying principles, models, and analytic approaches used in the basic sciences of physics and chemistry and be able to apply them in understanding and advancing electronic/optoelectronic components and systems.
Outcome 1C: The student will understand engineering principles of the major engineering areas and apply them to the solution of engineering problems and systems.
Broad Outcome 2: (Experimentation) The ability to design experiments, conduct experiments, and analyze experimental data.
Outcome 2A: The student will be able to identify directly and indirectly measure parameters for representation and modeling of physical phenomena.
Outcome 2B: The student will be able to define multiple approaches for experimental studies of physical phenomena.
Outcome 2C: The student will be able to design and use computer-based systems for experiments on physical phenomena and to assess experimental errors associated with such experiments.
Outcome 2D: The student will be able to display experimental results in a manner that demonstrates the quality of the measurements, including deviations of experimental results from analytical models.
Broad Outcome 3: (Tools). An ability to use the relevant tools necessary for engineering practice.
Outcome 3A: The student will be familiar with the use of machining tools
Outcome 3B: The student will be proficient in computer technologies for documentation, graphical, presentation of results, information search and retrieval, and overall project management.
Outcome 3C: The student will be familiar with the basic analytical instrumentation applied in the various engineering fields.
Broad Outcome 4: (Technical design) the technical ability to design a prescribed engineering subsystem.
Outcome 4A: The student will be able to develop mathematical or other descriptive models of a system, including variable inputs to the system, system parameters defining the response of the system to its inputs, and the generation of outputs in response to system inputs and system control parameters.
Outcome 4B: Given the desired response of a system to inputs, the student will be able to design a system providing that response, including control parameters as appropriate.
Outcome 4C: Given a desired high-level system description, the student will be able to decompose that description into constituent interconnected components implementing the overall system function.
Outcome 4D: In the design of components and systems, the student will be able to determine the costs (fixed and operating) of a design of the system and compare costs of alternative designs.
Broad Outcome 5: (Design assessment) The ability to develop and assess alternative system designs based on technical and non-technical criteria.
Outcome 5A: The student will be able to incorporate customer needs, environmental safeguards, and marketing features in the design and development of a system.
Outcome 5B: The student will be able to develop designs and implement designs according to a sequential schedule of activities, milestones, and barriers.
Outcome 5C: The student will be able to develop higher level representations of a system design to extract first-order needs and costs.
Outcome 5D: Upon completion of a design, the student will be able to create the necessary technical documentation and economic analysis as a record of the process and decisions.
Outcome 5E: During considerations of technical details and non-technical issues related to a system and its design, the student will be able to explore new and innovative approaches, beyond conventional designs, and assess their relative merits.
Outcome 5F: The student will be familiar with and conversant in the creation and protection of intellectual property.
Broad Outcome 6: (Professionalism) . The ability to recognize and achieve high levels of professionalism in their work.
Outcome 6A: The student will be able to develop task breakdowns and project plans with suitable timelines for project assignments.
Outcome 6B: The student will be able to apply principles of self-assessment as a means of judging personal accomplishments.
Outcome 6C: The student will understand, apply, and expect from others behaviors consistent with professional codes of ethics, such as the IEEE Code of Ethics.
Broad Outcome 7: (Leadership). An ability to assume leadership roles.
Outcome 7A: During participation in group projects, the student will understand the reality of stress and disappointments and will be able to contribute to the groups success under such conditions.
Outcome 7B: The student will be able to accept constructive criticism and be responsive to such criticism.
Outcome 7C: Within group/team projects, the student will contribute to and support the building of distributed tasks and responsibilities.
Outcome 7D: The student will contribute to exploration of alternative approaches to a team-based project and support the development and acceptance of consensus.
Broad Outcome 8: (Teamwork) the ability to function on teams.
Outcome 8A: While working on teams, the student will contribute to the collective planning of the team and take responsibility for the outcomes of the collective work.
Outcome 8C: While working on teams, the student will promote trust and conflict resolution.
Outcome 8D: While working on teams, the student will contribute positively to the exploration of alternative design and solution spaces for problems.
Outcome 8E: While working on teams, the student will understand and contribute to multidisciplinary viewpoints in problem solving.
Broad Outcome 9: (Communication) the ability to communicate effectively and persuasively.
Outcome 9A: The student will be able to develop and deliver effective presentations providing the crucial concepts, ideas, and innovations related to the topic of his/her presentation.
Outcome 9B: The student will be able to use alternative means of presenting ideas and information, including multimedia and Web-based approaches.
Outcome 9C: The student will practice effective listening, speaking, and writing skills.
Broad Outcome 10: (Ethics and morals). A critical understanding of ethical and moral systems in a social context.:
Outcome 10A: The student will be able to differentiate between and recognize different moral systems.
Outcome 10B: The student will understand relevant ethical systems and articulate ethical and moral principles in his/her professional activities.
Outcome 10C: The student will understand relevant ethical systems and articulate ethical and moral principles in his/her professional activities.
Broad Outcome 11: (Diversity). An understanding and appreciation of diversity and pluralism.
Outcome 11A: The student will understand and respect the diversity of individuals in religion, gender, race, sexual identity, class, and political associations.
Outcome 11B: The student will understand and respect the diversity of cultural backgrounds and contributions.
Outcome 11C: The student will develop and apply an informed and respectful stance on religion, gender, race, sexual identity, class, and political issues.
Broad Outcome 12: (Lifelong learning). A recognition of the need for and an ability to engage in lifelong learning and development.:
Outcome 12A: The student will maintain a contemporary understanding of scientific and technical concepts contributing to his/her successful professional practice.
Outcome 12B: The student will understand and apply the principles of constructive self-assessment and continuing activities for personal improvement.
Outcome 12C: The student will maintain a contemporary understanding of changing economic and political issues..
Broad Outcome 13: (Entrepreneurship). Have a fundamental knowledge and an appreciation of the technology and business processes necessary to nurture new technologies from concept to commercialization.
Outcome 13A: The students will understand the fundamentals of a typical business plan for a new high technology business
Outcome 13 B: The students will understand the fundamentals of marketing and determining customer demand for high technology new ventures/businesses.
Outcome 13C: The students will understand the fundamentals of engineering and business economics for high technology new ventures/businesses.


The relationship between the broad Outcomes (1 - 13), the CpE Program Outcomes (PPCs), the ABET Criteria, and the CpE Objectives is shown in Table B3.3.

Table B3.3. Relationships between CpE Outcomes, Abet Criteria, and CpE ObjectivesBroad Outcomes CpE Program OutcomesABET CriteriaCpE Objectives1 Scientific & Engineering Fundamentals1A, 1Ba1, 21Ce1, 2, 42 Experimentation2A, 2B, 2C, 2Db23. Tools3A, 3B, 3Ck24. Technical Design4A, 4B, 4C, 4Dc1, 2, 45. Design Assessment 5A2h45A, 5B, 5C, 5D, 5E, 5Fc46. Professionalism6A, 6B, 6Cf87. Leadership7A, 7B, 7C, 7Dd3, 88. Teamwork8A, 8C, 8D, 8Ed39. Communication9A, 9B, 9Cg610. Ethics and Morals10A, 10B, 10Cf511. Diversity11A, 11B, 11Cj--12. Lifelong Learning12A, 12B, 12Ci713. Entrepreneurship13A, 13B, 13C----
B3.2 School of Engineering Assessment Process Structure
Outcomes assessment is conducted at the Course Level (CL) and the Program Level (PL). Course level outcomes assessment is the responsibility of the course instructor. The assessment is based on the Course Survey and on the Student Performance Assessment. The results of the CL assessment are then integrated by the Program Committees to assess the overall performance of the program in satisfying its outcomes. The assessment results from the engineering core courses are appended to the individual program results. Ultimately, assessment will also be conducted at the School of Engineering Curriculum Level (EL), although this has not yet been implemented. The Outcomes Assessment Process is illustrated in Figure B3.2 and described here.
Student Performance Assessment is a direct measurement of student performance and is therefore the key method for underlying Program Outcomes assessment.
At the course level, instructors have completed the following steps:
1. The instructors of all the courses in the program have formed a list of Course Outcomes (APCs) for their courses. These were then correlated with the SoE CPCs, and therefore indirectly with the ABET Criterion 3 a-k.
2. Instructors identify Assessment Instruments, which are individual pieces of student work with which their performance on each APC will be measured. An Assessment Instrument is a piece of student work that can be uniquely identified with an APC, and which has an associated individual grade or rating associated with them. Examples include one or more of the following:
An individual homework problem.
An individual quiz or exam question.
An individual lab assignment.

3. A separate rating of an aspect of student work that may or may not be used as part of the student’s grade. For example, a design report may have an overall grade assigned to it but, for the purpose of assessing the student’s ability to express technical material in writing, a separate grade can be assigned for the quality of the writing on that piece of work by the instructor.

Figure B3.2. SoE Outcomes Assessment Process


4. All grades are converted to a zero-to-four (F to A) scale according to the instructor’s judgment. The scaled numerical grades are then evaluated to assess the distribution of student performance for each CPC or APC. This information is collected on a Student Performance Assessment Data Form (SPAD). This form displays the CPC and/or APC, the Assessment Instrument, the number of students in the course being assessed, and measures of a high, low and central grade for the performance of those students on that Assessment Instrument.
For example, a course might assess the following:
CPC: 3C2 – The student will be familiar with the basic analytical instrumentation applied in the various engineering fields..
APC: Students will learn how to perform titrations.
Assessment Instrument: Grade on an alkalinity titration laboratory report.
The grades on this report are presented in one or several ways. One is the use of the mean grade and grades at plus and minus one standard deviation from that average. Alternatively, the 25th percentile, the median, and the 75th percentile, or the minimum, median, and maximum grades can be reported. These grade summaries for the course provide a measure of the distribution of student performance on the particular CPC/APC.
5. The results of the Student Performance Assessment are reported by the instructor on the Student Performance Assessment Data Form.
The Course Survey by course students is conducted via a Web site using software from Ascendus Corp. The survey asks students to evaluate the quality of learning in the course, with respect to the Course Outcomes surveyed by the questions. For each CPC or APC the student indicates whether the course provided a “great learning experience,” a “significant new learning,” “some new learning,” or “little new learning.” At the end of the semester, normally near the end of finals period, instructors are provided with the raw data and statistical measures of the the results of the Course Survey.
The course instructor performs a qualitative analysis to determine which course outcomes have not been achieved. This analysis includes the results of the Student Performance Assessment by the instructor; the results of the Course Surveys provided by the students, and any informal information that may have been provided informally. Drawing on this analysis and his/her own perception of any difficulties associated with the course, the instructor completes the Instructor Course Assessment Form. This form asks the instructor to provide the following information (an assessment method developed by Brigham Young University was used to guide SEAC in the development of this course assessment form):
1) Course changes made during the current term are listed, with indication sof whether the changes were suggested by the assessment process and whether the changes made were effective.
2) Course Outcomes that were not achieved to the satisfaction of the instructor are listed, along with an explanation regarding the reason for that conclusion. Typically, decisions are based on the Course Survey, The Assessment Data Form, and the instructor’s personal judgment (the basis for the decision should be indicated).
3) Improvements recommended and/or planned for the course during its next offering are listed.
4) List and comment on changes you would like to see in Course Outcomes.
Both the Student Performance Assessment Data Form and the Instructor Course Assessment Form are collected by the Program Coordinator for analysis for the Program Level Outcomes Assessment. These forms are included with the course materials for each course for inspection.
B3.3 Implementation of Program Assessment by the CpE Program
The CpE program implemented the course and program assessment process described above for the Fall 02 and Spring 03 semesters. Details related to that assessment process are presented here.
B3.4.1 Course Assessment by Instructor
Given the course-specific definition of the course outcomes, student performance can be assessed on the basis of a mapping of problems in assignments to specific course APCs. For student performance assessment, three different types of course assignment are used, namely homework, tests, and projects. Data such as the average grade and standard deviation of those grades for a specific assigned problem are taken as measures of student performance for that assignment, and for APCs related to that assignment’s problems. Figure B3.3 illustrates this general process for a given criterion X (e.g., 1A3) for assignment L and question J of that assignment.
The interpretation of these measures depends on several issues. For example, the box in Figure B3.3 labeled “Instructor Evaluation for Question” shows three of the possible combinations of average grade and standard deviation.
i. High average grade and small standard deviation. Some possible cases include the following
a. Topic was introduced in this course. This result might indicate that the instructor has done a good job of introducing and developing the topic of the specific question.
b. Topic was developed in an earlier course and the question was used to provide the student with repetition of the topic to reinforce its learning. In this case, the result would indicate that the topic was developed satisfactorily in the earlier course(s).
ii. Low average grade and small standard deviation. Some possible cases include the following
a. Topic was introduced in this course. This result might indicate that the instructor has not adequately developed the topic and the course should be adjusted to provide better coverage of the topic.
b. Topic was developed in an earlier course and the question was used to provide the student with repetition of the topic to reinforce its learning. In this case, the result would indicate that the topic was not developed satisfactorily in the earlier course(s). The result could lead to changes in this course or to recommendations for changes in the courses that were expected to cover the topic.
These basic cases are given to illustrate the importance of having quantitative data based on student performance in assignments but also the different interpretations that would be appropriate, depending on a variety of factors. For this reason, Figure B3.3 shows the integration of evaluations for a given criterion as being a qualitative evaluation by the instructor. The same process is used for other criteria related to assignments during the semester being assessed, leading to a report by the instructor to the CpE program committee. That report includes information such as shown on the right side of Figure B3.3.
To report the student performance assessments, each instructor completes the Student Performance Assessment Form shown in Figure B3.4. An example of a completed form from the Spring 03 assessment is shown in Figure B3.5.
The instructor then completes the Instructor Course Assessment Form, shown in the example (CpE462 for the Spring 03 semester) in Figure B3.6. These course assessment forms are provided to the Program Directors and the Department Director and establish a record of the evolution of a course over time based on the assessment process. Student performance assessments and course assessment forms for the Fall 02 semester and the Spring 03 semester have been integrated (along with other assessment material) into a Web-based site to allow easy access to the information by all ECE faculty members. The Web site is . This Web site has deactivated the links to student comments. The Web address including student comments will be provided to the ABET review team.
The Course Assessment Form in Figure B3.6 does not include a means for the instructor to report to the program concerns related to the preparation of students through the CpE curriculum for his/her course, nor does it include a means for the instructor to report concerns regarding preparation of students through the core engineering program. Fields for such feedback will be added to the CpE forms for the Fall 03 semester, encouraging the instructor to provide input to the middle and outer feedback loops for curriculum adjustments.


Figure B3.3. CpE student performance assessment by course instructor
Student Performance Assessment Process
1. Select CPCs: Examine the CPC list for your course and select six to ten to assess.
2. Identify Student Work: Identify one or more pieces of student work (an individual homework or exam question, a paper or report, etc.) that uniquely assesses each CPC.
You can use items of student work that you have already assigned and graded, as long as you still have the grade for the individual item. For example, a quiz grade should only be used if the entire quiz represents a test of the subject of the associated CPC. If the quiz is a test of multiple skills, you will need to select an individual problem.
You may also decide to add homeworks or quiz items to your course so as to better assess one or more CPCs that you or your Program Coordinator consider important.
3. Collect the grades for the student work on your list for each student in the program. (I.e., leave out graduate students and students from other programs.)
4. Convert the grades to a zero-to-four scale (A = 4.0) if not already in that form.
5. Compute summary statistics for the grades, choosing from one of the following groups (A spreadsheet is available to assist in steps 4 and 5.):
a: Mean – Std. Dev. Mean Mean + Std. Dev. b: 25th Percentile Median 75th Percentile c: Minimum Median Maximum d: -- Percent passed -- e: Other (defined by instructor).
6. Compile the results on the Student Performance Assessment Data Form. You should also use one row for the summary statistics for the overall course grade for the students in the program, whether or not the overall grade corresponds to a single CPC. Use additional forms if necessary. Provide the Program Coordinator with a copy of the form.
7. Analyze the results on (a) the Student Performance Assessment Data Form, as well as (b) the results of the Attitudinal Survey and (c) your own observations and anecdotal information. Use your analysis to plan improvements to your course and to fill out the questions on the Instructor Course Assessment Form. Provide the Program Coordinator with a copy of this form. The next time you offer the course you should implement the changes you propose, and repeat the assessment process
Figure B3.4. Instructions for completion of Student Performance Assessment form (SoE-EAC).

Instructor: Hong Man Course name: Intro to Image Proc & Coding Course No.: CpE462 Section: A Session: Sp 03CPCAssessment Performance Criterion (Course Outcome)ABET Crit 3Assessment Instrument (Student Work To Be Assessed)Summary Stats of Student GradeN**Avg.-StDAvg.*Avg.+ StD1A2Mathematical skillsaHW1.1, HW1.2, HW2.1, HW3, HW4.2
Midterm 1.1~1.4 (40% of midterm)
Midterm 2, Final 1.1 (10% of final), Final 1.5 (10% of final)882.483.233.891A3Relevance of math to applicationsaHW5.1, HW8, Final 1.2 (10% of final)882.302.893.401A4Algorithmic thinking through state diagramaMidterm 1.5 (10% of Midterm)
Final 1.3 (10% of final)882.403.103.751C5System frequency analysis eHW2.2, Midterm 3 (20% of midterm)
Final 1.4 (10% of final)882.733.333.813B2Computational toolskHW1.3, HW2.3883.553.904.003B3System simulation toolskHW5.2. HW6.2, HW7.2
Project (50% of project)882.513.113.554A3Relate system input and outputcHW6.1, HW7.1
Final 3 (25% of final)881.792.663.484B1Specify system componentscFinal 1.6 (10% of final)883.53.84.05E1Innovative system designcProject (50% of project)882.63.03.45E3Diverse problem solving strategiescFinal 2 (15% of final)882.12.83.5Overall Grade882.43.24.0
Figure B3.5. Example of instructor's completed student performance assessment form

Instructor Course Assessment Form
Instructor: Hong Man Course: CpE462 Section: A Session: Sp 031. List course changes made this term. Indicate which changes were made as a result of the assessment process. Comment on the success of the changes made this semester.
a) Offered two off-class tutorial sessions on mathematical fundamentals, this is according to previous student performance and students’ request.
b) Increased student practice on Matlab and C programming. This has been a weakness of our students, as indicated from student survey and performance.
c) Besides normal slide show presentation, tablet was used to derive mathematical results.

From student survey and student performance, we see:
a) Tutorial sessions improved student understanding on mathematical fundamentals. Students got chance to ask personal questions. Their performance was improved as seen in Final 1.1, 1.5
b) Programming skill is still a bottleneck to this course. There were different level of skills in this class, some of them were very good, but most of them still felt difficulties, as seen in student survey.
c) Tablet is helpful, as some students mentioned in the survey.2. List outcomes that were not achieved to your satisfaction and your reasoning for feeling these outcomes were not achieved. Base your response on the Course Survey, The Assessment Data Form, and your personal judgment, and indicate which of these you used for each comment.
a) Students were still not well prepared with sufficient programming skills. This is indicated once again by students’ survey comments, and their performance in homeworks, exams and project.
b) Students did not get sufficient exposure on practical problems. They had difficulty to link the fundamental knowledge they had learned with real applications. This was indicated by their performance in final and project.
c) Large class size has been a barrier for full instructor/student interactions. Students complained that they had difficulty to follow the lecture in large class, and they could not get chance to ask questions. Also large class involved students at significantly different learning levels. Both good students and slow students were upset.3. List improvements you plan to make to this course.
a) Spend some more time to review programming basics. Also start the project earlier to get students involved and give them enough time to learn.
b) Develop a lab component for students to learn basic system setup for image processing. This has very popular demand from students.
c) Offer class in small sessions. This will solve communication problems between instructor and students.
4. List and comment on changes you would like to see in course outcomes.
a) We can remove 1A4, flow chart is not critical image processing algorithm design.
b) We can remove 3B3, it is sufficient to use 3B2.
c) We can replace 5E3 with 5B1, for a given objective, student should be able to specify system requirement.Figure B3.6 Instructor Course Assessment Form
B3.4.2 Course Assessment by Students
The discussion above has described the use of student performance assessment based on grades achieved in assignment problems, one of the primary metrics for course assessment. A second primary metric is (discussed in Section B3.2) provided by evaluations of each course by students at the end of the semester. These evaluations for the CpE program used the course criteria directly, in some cases using slightly abridged statements to accommodate the word length restrictions of the Web environment used for student evaluations of courses.
Figure B3.7 illustrates the general structure of the Web-based student course evaluations (left side of figure) and the evaluation of a course by its instructor based on feedback from those student evaluations.



Figure B3.7. General structure of Web-based evaluation of course by student

As indicated in Figure B3.7, the student evaluation includes both general questions and course-specific questions. The set of generic questions (developed by the Stevens’ Dean of Undergraduate Academics) were similar to paper-based student course evaluations used prior to the introduction by the School of Engineering of the Web-based evaluations. These questions are neither course specific or program specific, instead addressing general issues related to the performance of the instructor and of the materials used in the course. In addition to providing a rating for each of the “Dean’s” questions, students could also enter comments. The “Dean's” questions included in the student evaluations were as follows.
Instructor clearly explains course objectives and grading policy.
The instructor is prepared for class and successfully communicates the subject matter.
The instructor is available to students.
Overall: The instructor was an effective teacher.
Student work is graded promptly.
Exam questions were a good test of student`s understanding.
Overall: The quality of the course was excellent.
Student responses were (i) strongly agree, (ii) somewhat agree, (iii) neutral, (iv) somewhat disagree, and (v) strongly disagree. In addition to providing the instructor with the breakdown of student responses (percentage with each answer) to each of these questions, instructors were also provided with the mean (maximum value equal to 5) and standard deviation for each question.
More directly related to the specific course being evaluated by the student are the questions based on the specific course assessment criteria developed by the instructor and approved by the ECE Program Committee. For both the Fall 02 and Spring 03 student course evaluations, the questions included on SEAC’s Web-based course survey site were direct statements of the specific APCs for each CpE course surveyed. In some cases, the criteria had to be slightly reworded to meet the word-length restrictions for each question on the course evaluation page. Following completion of these surveys, the results were collected, analyses completed, and results made available to the instructors, the CpE program director, and the ECE Department Director. The course survey results for all ECE course evaluations were assembled and placed on a departmental web site so that all members of the department faculty could review the results, in preparation for discussions regarding suggested changes in the course and in the program that take into account the student evaluations. The Web site is at http://stewks.ece.stevens-tech.edu/AbetAssess/. The directory “AbetAssess” is case sensitive. As noted earlier, results from other surveys (alumni, co-op students, employers of co-op students, the ECE Undergraduate Council) are also accessible at this Web site.
The responses to the questions used for the student evaluations (AY 2002-2003) of the CpE courses were typically
Response Weight for averaging
Great new learning experience. 6
Significant new learning experience. 5
Some new learning experience. 4
Little new learning experience. 3
Unsure regarding new learning experience 2
Not applicable. 1

In several cases, a course contains components used to reinforce a student’s prior learning, rather than to provide new learning. In such cases, the effect of including the review and reinforcement material might be regarded positively by the student. However, if that material was not “new learning,” the student might be inclined to give a low rating (little new learning). For the AY 2003-2004 surveys, it is expected that the ECE Department will replace the word “learning” in the list of responses above with the word “education.” to eliminate this ambiguity.
It was felt that including the last two responses when calculating the average ranking of the course by students was inappropriate (e.g., giving an artificial minimum ranking of 2.0). In addition, some questions used only one of the last two responses, impacting the ranking value relative to those with both questions. For this reason, the course ratings given on the ECE Web site noted above were recalculated using only the first four responses (with weights from 4 to 1). Overall, the ECE faculty found the results of these course-specific student evaluations far superior to the earlier paper-based surveys with the same general questions used for all courses. The student course surveys provided a rich set of information regarding various aspects of the program's courses. The survey response ratings (using only the first four responses in the list above with a minimum value of 1 for "little new learning" and a maximum value of 4 for "great new learning") were extracted from the data and assembled to obtain ratings for each of the program outcomes. The data for the program outcomes associated with a given broad outcome (1 through 13) were combined to obtain a rating for each of the broad outcomes (and thus for each of the ABET criteria). Examples of this ratings development are shown in Appendix I-G.5.
B3.5 Mappings of Course Outcomes to Program Outcomes
Table B3.4 shows the mapping of the engineering core curriculum courses to the broad outcomes 1 through 13. The labels "L", "M". and "H" represent a low, medium, and high contribution, respectively, of the course to the outcome. The mapping in Table B3.4 reflects the SoE-EAC approach of mapping the CPCs (lowest level of the hierarchy) directly to the broad outcomes (top level of the hierarchy). Table B3.5 shows the mapping of the CpE -specific courses, first to the CpE program outcomes (the middle layer of the hierarchy) and then to the broad outcomes 1 through 6. The capstone project course sequence EE 423/424 contributes to several of the broad outcomes 7 though 13 and those APCs are provided in Appendix I-H. Due to the large number of outcomes connected to the capstone project courses, listings of the APCs for these courses are abridged in the course syllabus in Appendix I-B and only in Appendix I-H is the full list provided.
This two step mapping reflects the use of the middle level of the hierarchy as the CpE program outcomes. Rather than using the L/M/H representation, the APCs of each course contributing to the program outcome and broad outcome are listed directly. A sense of the contribution of a course to a program outcome is provided by the number of APCs associated with a given program outcome.
When developing the course maps for the CpE program, the issue of courses taken by some students, but not all students, arose. Up to four distinct types of courses may contribute to a student's overall plan of study leading to a Bachelor's degree. These are
i. Core engineering courses (the map for these courses was given in Section B3.5.1 above and Table B3.4).
ii. Required CpE-specific “core” courses.
iii. Undergraduate technical electives in the ECE programs (EE and CpE).
iv. Undergraduate technical electives from other Steven's disciplinary programs (e.g., CS, Math)
v. Undergraduate electives from other Steven's disciplinary programs (e.g., humanities, etc).
vi. Lower level (500-level) graduate courses available to qualified students.
The ECE faculty decided that the CpE course assessments should initially cover all CpE-specific courses (item ii above) and all ECE technical electives (item iii above). This decision was the basis for instructor assessments of student performance and student evaluations of courses for the Fall 02 and the Spring 03 semester. However, in presenting the course map shown in Table B3.5, only required CpE program courses were included since this is the set of courses taken by all students.
The assessment process developed in response to the ABET assessment requirements has proven to be manageable and useful for overall course evaluation and adjustment. For this reason, the assessment process will be extended for the Fall 03 semester to include 500-level courses that are routinely taken as technical electives by CpE undergraduate students. Table B3.4. Mapping of Core Engineering Course Outcomes to Program Outcomes

Scientific FoundataionsEngineering FoundationsExperi- mentalEngineeirng ToolsDesignDesign AssessmentProfession- alismLeadershipTeamworkCommuni- cation SkillsEthicsContempor- ary issuesLife-long LearningEntrepren- eurshipABET CriterionAB.BKCHFDDGFFI--Broad Outcome1A,B1C2345678910111213E101 – Engineering SeminarLLLLE120 – Engineering GraphicsMLLLE121 – Engineering Design ILLLLMLMLE122 – Engineering Design IILLLLMMLMLLE126 – Mechanics of SolidsLMLLLMLMLE231 – Engineering Design IIILLLMLMME234 – Thermo & Energy Conv.MLE245 – Circuits & SystemsLLLLTEE232 – Engineering Design IVLLMMMLTEE243 - Probability & StatisticsMLLLE246 – Electronics & Instrument.LMTETEE344 – Materials ProcessingLLLE321 - Engineering Design VLLLMMLE355 - Engineering EconomicsMMXX345 - Modeling & SimulationXX322 - Engineering Design VITETEE421 - Eng. Economics & DesignLLMCpE423/424 - Design VII & VIIITETE8-course Humanities sequenceHLHM Table B3.5. Mapping of CpE Required Courses to CpE Outcomes 1 through 6.
OutcomeTerm IVTerm IVTerm VTerm VTerm VITerm VITerm VITerm VIITerm VIITerm VIITerm VIIICpE 360CpE 358EE 471CpE 390CpE 345CpE 322CpE 462CpE 487CpE 490CpE 423CpE 42411A1A1, 1A2 1A31A1, 1A2
1A31A4, 1A51A1, 1A2
1A31A1, 1A2
1A3, 1A41A1, 1A2
1A31A4, 1A51A4, 1A51A1, 1A2
1A3, 1A4
1A51A1, 1A2
1A3, 1A4
1A51B1B1, 1B2 1B31C1C41C1, 1C3 1C41C41C51C51C4, 1C51C4, 1C522A2A1, 2A22B2C2C1, 2C22C32C32D2D1, 2D2, 2D32D1, 2D2, 2D333B3B3, 3B43B2, 3B33B3, 3B43B1, 3B2 3B33B2, 3B3 3B43B2 , 3B33B1, 3B23B1, 3B2 3B33B1 - 3B63B1 - 3B63C3C23C244A4A2, 4A3 4A44A2, 4A3 4A44A2, 4A3 4A2, 4A3 4A34A24A3 , 4A44A2, 4A3 4A2, 4A3 4B4B14B1, 4B24B14B14B1, 4B24B14B14C4C14C14C14C155A5A1, 5A25A1, 5A2 5A45A1, 5A2 5A45B5B15B15B15B15D5D15D15D15D15D15D15E5E15E15E1, 5E35E15E1, 5E2 5E35E1, 5E2 5E366A6A16A1, 6A26A1, 6A26B6B26B26C6C1, 6C26C1, 6C2

B3.6 Overall CpE Program Assessment
B3.6.1 General Process for Overall Program Assessment
Figure B3.8 illustrates the general process for review of the performance of the CpE program in satisfying its program outcomes.


Figure B3.8. Overall CpE program assessment.

Inputs to the CpE program review team are provided by a variety of mechanisms, including the course assessment report from the instructor and the student evaluations of the courses, discussed above. In addition, feedback related to satisfying the outcomes of the CpE program are provided by exit surveys (the EBI surveys are used), input from the ECE Undergraduate Student Council through their surveys and discussions, feedback from the School of Engineering, and from various other sources. The entire ECE faculty serves as the review team for each of its two undergraduate programs (CpE and EE), since several serve as instructors in both programs.
Following the Fall 02 semester, a number of recommendations and changes in the program were developed based largely on general information received during the Fall 02 and earlier semesters. The process for assessing student performance was not completed until near the end of the Fall 02 semester, limiting the extent to which complete data was available for courses. The student evaluations of courses were relatively complete, with several comments suggesting specific issues seen by students. However, lacking the student performance data, a fully deployed process was not available at the end of the Fall 02 semester.
The process discussed above has been fully implemented during the Spring 03 semester and the first full assessment, based on the full set of inputs to the assessment process, will applied to the Fall 03 semester. Evaluations of assessment at the CpE program level will be performed during the Summer 03 break.
B3.6.2 Co-op Student and Co-op Student Employer Surveys
Informal feedback from co-op students has typically emphasized the need for students to have a greater preparation in practical applications and contemporary design tools. This includes hands-on projects through which they can "experiment" with topics such as networking, operating systems, etc. The limited software programming component in the core engineering program is often raised as a weakness of the overall program.
Two questionnaires were deployed by SEAC, one distributed to co-op students and the other distributed to their employers (supervisors). The results of these surveys are summarized in Appendices I-G.2 and I-G.3
A large proportion of the contacted co-op students completed the questionnaire. Both the EE and the CpE co-op students indicate that their education at Stevens should be strengthened in the area of experimentation, tools (design tools, etc.), and design assessment. However, the most strongly criticized area among the CpE responses was technical design (40% viewing the Stevens’ preparation as being only fair). . These themes mirror feedback from other surveys as well as areas already identified by the ECE Department for increased attention.
The feedback from the employers of the co-op students was generally very positive. The only area receiving significant negative feedback was leadership, with about 25% viewing the Stevens’ preparation of students as being only fair.
B3.6.3 ECE Undergraduate Student Council
The survey developed by and administered by the ECE Undergraduate Student Council was a thoughtful set of questions, representing the perspective of students presently enrolled in the ECE programs. During the Spring 2003 semester, the Council developed a questionnaire to obtain the "sense" of the ECE students regarding issues selected by the Council. Representatives of the Undergraduate Student Council visited a selected set of classes, where they reviewed the activities of the Council and distributed the questionnaires. The questionnaires were returned to the Council, which analyzed the responses and prepared a report to the ECE Director. The information obtained was substantial, much reinforcing what was learned from evaluations of objectives using feedback from the constituencies discussed above. In addition, the questions represented issues of concern to the students themselves, rather than expressing issues felt to be important by faculty members.
The Council’s survey questionnaire and its report to the ECE Director are provided in Appendix I-G.6. The questionnaire was a wide-ranging set of questions, with ample opportunities for student comments. The report of the Council to the ECE Director demonstrates that the students generally favor substantially more “hands-on” experiences and other changes in concert with feedback from other sources. In particular, changes reflecting recommendations from the various consistencies should be met favorably by the CpE students.
B3.6.4 EBI Exit Interviews and Benchmarking
Exit surveys of graduating students were performed using the EBI questionnaires, a mechanism allowing direct comparison of the responses of Stevens SOE students to the responses obtained from graduating students at several other universities. The benchmarking was done against a selected set of six universities that are viewed as “peer” institutions as well as universities ranking as “Carnegie Class” institutions.
These surveys have been performed at the end of three previous academic years, though the number of Stevens' students responding to the first trials of this survey was quite small, preventing extraction of clear performance measures.
At the end of the 2001-2002 academic year, all students in the senior capstone design course (CpE 423/424) were provided with the EBI questionnaires and strongly encouraged to complete these surveys. The result was a significant increase in the proportion of students completing the surveys. The 2001-2002 EBI CpE survey included a set of 18 ABET-related (a through k criteria) questions, with student responses (Stevens, Select 6 peer universities, and Carnegie class institutions) shown in Figure B3.9. The 18 questions (corresponding to the number on the x-axis of the chart) were
To what degree did your engineering education enhance your ability to
Question ABET
number Question Criteria
1. Apply your knowledge of science? a
2. Apply your knowledge of mathematics? a
3. Apply your knowledge of engineering? a
4. Analyze and interpret data? b
5. Conduct experiments? b
6. Design experiments? b
7. Design a system component or process to meet desired needs? c
8. Function on multidisciplinary teams? d
9. Identify engineering problems? e
10. Formulate engineering problems? e
11. Solve engineering problems? e
12. Understand ethical responsibilities? f
13. Communicate using written progress reports? g
14. Communicate using oral progress reports? g
15. Understand the impact of engineering solutions in a global/societal context? h
16. Recognize the need to engage in lifelong learning? i
17. Understand contemporary issues? j
18. Use modern engineering tools?


 EMBED Excel.Sheet.8 
Figure B3.9 Fall 02 EBI exit survey results for CpE students

The data in Figure B3.9 shows rankings by Stevens CpE students slightly, but consistently, below the average rankings by students from the Select 6 universities and from the Carnegie class universities in most categories. Although this result is a concern, it is felt to be in part a result of the heavy course load of the program. Adjustments of the core engineering program for the Fall 03 semester are intended to address this issue. The ranking for questions 12 and18 are noticeably depressed relative to the other university rankings. The reason for the lower ranking for question 12 (understanding of ethical responsibilities) is surprising and not easily understood. The lower ranking for question 18 (use of modern engineering tools) mirrors feedback from other sources and actions to expand the use contemporary computer engineering tools in the program are planned for the 2003-2004 academic year.
B3.7 Summary of Core Engineering and CpE Program Changes
Changes in the School of Engineering curriculum and in the CpE program associated with program outcomes are summarized below. Other changes in the programs associated with program objectives were presented earlier in Section 2.6. Those changes also impact the program outcomes, but are not repeated in detail below.

Program Outcome 1: (Scientific foundations) Students will have the ability to use applied scientific knowledge
No significant problems have been suggested by course assessments in the areas of physics, chemistry, and engineering science, with the core SoE curriculum providing a strong background in these areas and the CpE program providing additional background in engineering science. (Outcomes 1A and 1B).
The core engineering program provides students are satisfactory preparation in the traditional mathematics topics. Discrete mathematics is not covered by that core program. Although many of the discrete mathematics topics were covered in various CpE-specific courses, a required course in discrete mathematics was added to the CpE curriculum starting in the 2003-2004 academic year. (Outcome 1C).

Program Outcome 2: (Experimentation) the ability to design experiments, conduct experiments, and analyze experimental data.
The laboratory experience is developed throughout the engineering core curriculum, both within the laboratories associated with the foundation science courses and in the core design laboratories. The survey conducted by the ECE Undergraduate Council reports that the connection between some of the core laboratories and their corresponding lecture courses is too weak. This issue is recognized by SoE-EAC and corrections are under consideration. No significant problems are apparent from course assessments for laboratory courses of the core engineering program contributing to this outcome.
Student assessments of the CpE 390 laboratory component indicate deficiencies with regard to the maintenance of equipment in that laboratory (Microelectronic Systems Lab - Burchard 123). This problem is merely one of the teaching assistants not adequately reporting maintenance problems arising during laboratory sessions and corrections will be made during the Fall 03 offering of the course.
Both CpE and EE students have suggested the need for a laboratory "playroom" in which they can, outside of the regularly scheduled laboratory sessions, play with hardware and software technologies. A small laboratory (Burchard 125) is planned for providing such a facility. This laboratory was equipped with some basic instrumentation during the 2002-2003 semester, primarily is support of senior design projects. The ECE Department intends to develop this laboratory to support the "playroom" concept. The main constraint is to provide supervision of this small facility while allowing general access to the equipment. This issue will be reviewed with the Undergraduate Student Council to determine whether the undergraduates themselves can assume the responsibility of oversight of the playroom laboratory.
The ECE Department is deploying resources and equipment associated with the "Product Innovation Laboratory" funded by the School of Engineering for all engineering students (emphasizing senior design project support). These resources are planned for deployment during the Summer 03, in preparation for the Fall 02 semester.
A LAN testbed facility has been deployed and means of integrating this testbed with its routers, switches, firewalls, and related equipment into the CpE and EE components of the ECE program are under discussion. Due to the nature of "experimentation" with complex networks, this testbed is likely to serve as a useful "playroom" facility, assuming that appropriate monitoring of the facility can be arranged. This initiative is being developed in cooperation with Structured Networks Institute and is expected to be activated during the Fall 03 semester.
The various initiatives above are intended to supplement an overall laboratory experimentation component that is, relative to that provided by other universities, satisfactory. They are not presented to suggest that there are significant deficiencies in the current program.

Program Outcome 3: (Tools) Students will have an ability to use the relevant tools necessary for engineering practice.
The use of modern tools is developed throughout the core engineering design courses. This is described in detail in Section B4. No significant problems were noted for core course contributions to the outcome based on course assessments and course corrections will be minor.
Introduction of new software tools and upgrading of existing tools are continuing themes of the CpE program. The software tools available are evolving rapidly and the tools provided need to keep up with this evolution. In addition, rather different software tools are needed for different applications, often with each application's tools requiring a significant learning curve. No significant deficiencies are apparent with the software tools available for the CpE program. However, the program has been integrating new tools into several of its courses as a routine part of the natural evolution of the courses.
CpE students have demonstrated sophistication in the use of computer-based and information technology-based tools (CpE Outcome 3B). However, our CpE students do not gain significant preparation in software programming and engineering, a significant weakness well recognized by the ECE faculty. This weakness also arises from feedback from students, both formal through surveys and informally through discussions. To provide increased knowledge in this area, it is necessary to prepare the students as early as possible for the routine use of software programming during their undergraduate years and to provide students with regular applications of their programming skills in courses. The School of Engineering has adjusted its Freshman year program to place a highly focussed programming class (E115) into the first semester and to draw upon that semester's Engineering Design course to provide programming examples.
To further support the development of stronger programming skills, two changes have been made in the core CpE curriculum. One is the addition of a required discrete math course in Term IV to the 2003-2004 catalog. The other was the replacement in the 2002-2003 AY of the CS 384 data structures and algorithms course with a CpE-specific course - CpE 360, Computational Data Structures and Algorithms. The CpE program has also embedded programming experiences in some required courses (e.g., CpE 487 and CpE 490).
Assessments from SoE laboratory projects and ECE program laboratory projects indicate no significant problems in the use of instrumentation (CpE Outcome 3C). Outcome 3A is covered adequately by the Core SoE program.
Program Outcome 4: (Technical Design) Students will have the technical ability to design a prescribed engineering subsystem.
As discussed in detail in Section B2, the Steven’ engineering curriculum features a significant design experience in the form of a Design Spine which includes a design course in each semester staring form the first semester of Freshman year and culminates with a capstone senior design course. Faculty teams have been established to oversee and improve the integration of the design courses with the engineering science courses taught concurrently in the first five semesters. No significant other problems from course assessments have been noted for engineering core course contributions to this outcome and only routine course corrections are planned.
CpE program outcomes 4A, 4B, and 4C relate to the ability of a student to quantitatively complete a significant design problem. Course assessments have not indicated significant problems in this area within the CpE program. Informal feedback from students as well as results obtained by the ECE Undergraduate Student Council from their Spring 03 survey suggest that this is an area that deserves further development. Individual and team projects have been added to several CpE core and technical elective courses, helping to address this outcome in part. In addition, the new Bachelor’s in Engineering with Thesis degree provides a mechanism for some students to pursue aggressive designs.
A limitation has been the students’ access to facilities and equipment through which a significant hardware/software project can be completed through the various phases of design, verification, build, and testing. This limitation also impacts the students’ capstone projects. Actions to correct this limitation with regard to hardware system design were discussed in the section above on outcome 2. Software projects are supported by the Stevens' program providing all undergraduates with a laptop computer and a suite of software products.
The capstone design project has been effective in providing students with the development of a competitive and compelling engineering design. A new coordinator for the capstone design courses (CpE 423-424) was recruited for the 2002-2003 academic year and significant improvements in the performance of students in this course were evident at the end of the 2002-2003 academic year. Several of the capstone projects (a listing of the 40 projects completed during the 2002-2003 AY is given in Appendix I-F.5.
Program Outcome 5: (Design Assessment) Students will have the ability to develop and assess alternative system designs based on technical and non-technical criteria.
The core engineering program's Design Spine courses contribute to this outcome. Difficulty of handling open–ended problems was noted in the assessment of the freshman core course E126 Mechanics of Solids. Specific steps are being undertaken in E126 to provide more guidance.
Course assessments and student evaluations of CpE courses do not suggest significant problems related to this outcome. However, student weaknesses related to assessing alternative systems based on technical criteria are indicated by the project design reports submitted by students in CpE 322 (Engineering Design VI) and in the design phase of the capstone project experience. Critical technical evaluations of designs (i.e., actively looking for the weaknesses and errors) was highlighted during the Spring 03 offering of CpE 322, with each project formally completing a technically driven report on the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats (SWOT) associated with their projects. Students completing the SWOT analysis indicated that they enjoyed the assignment but indicated little prior experience in such critical self-analysis.
The report by the ECE Undergraduate Student Council and discussions with students raised an issue associated with this outcome that was not anticipated. In particular, there is a desire among students for increased opportunities to design their own projects earlier in the curriculum than their final year when the complete the capstone project. The informal discussions suggest that students find the core engineering laboratories, though useful, to be largely "canned" and pre-prepared laboratory projects, complete with instructions on what to do. There is interest in having opportunities to explore projects that they themselves design and execute. This suggestion lies at the heart of this broad design assessment outcome and actions to provide such opportunities will be introduced as soon as possible. The "playroom" laboratory mentioned earlier is one element of providing students with this opportunity. However, there remains the issue of what resources should be available to students in support of their personal projects (hardware, software, or hardware/software projects). The ECE Department will work with the ECE Undergraduate Student Council and with the ECE honorary society (Eta Kappa Nu) to develop and execute a strategy in this area. Since the issue of design reoccurs in a variety of formal feedback mechanisms (student course evaluations, alumni surveys, co-op student surveys, etc.), this topic is viewed as a priority for deployment.
Program Outcome 6: (Professionalism) Students will have the ability to recognize and achieve high levels of professionalism in their work.
The core engineering Design Spine courses contribute significantly to this outcome. No significant problems noted in assessments of core course contributions to this outcome; however it is noted that this is an outcome that is difficult to assess and some attention to this outcome, both its expression and its assessment, is needed.
Assessments of CpE courses, as well as observations of student behaviors and performance in presentations and other activities, indicate that CpE students have well-developed abilities in this general area. The co-op students, through their intern experiences, also gain important skills while working. Overall, students have a remarkable ability to project a professional level of conduct during formal presentations and executions of their capstone projects.
Although the majority of students comply with and respect the Stevens’ Honor Code, there remain students who disregard the importance of avoiding plagiarism (in the sense of copying), one of the items covered by CpE Outcome 6C. The ECE Department has been aggressive in reporting suspicions of Honor Code violations to the Honor Board. Guidelines for use by graders and teaching assistants are being prepared for the Fall 03 semester, with the objective of implementing an effective policy that will address the problem of Honor Code violations occurring within the CpE program. However, students have some difficulty distinguishing between group activities leading to completion of homework assignments and plagiarism. Information providing students with additional guidance in distinguishing between appropriate group activities related to assignments and plagiarism (in its most basic form as simply copying) will be provided on the ECE Web site for the Fall 03 semester. Once the distinction is made clear, students are able to avoid the actions that lead to plagiarism. However, there does not appear to be a uniform policy regarding this issue throughout the courses at Stevens taken by the students. The ECE Department will seek to establish and enforce a uniform policy across its courses.

Program Outcome 7: (Leadership) Students will have an ability to assume leadership roles.
As with Outcome 6, no significant problems noted from assessment in core engineering courses but the definition and assessment of this outcome might benefit from review.
No significant problems have been seen from the various means of assessing this outcome. Opportunities for students to apply their leadership abilities arise not only within the CpE academic program but also in the many student organizations and other activities throughout campus. CpE students have played a leadership role is many of these activities. The ECE Student Council is an example of an opportunity established by the ECE Department for students to assume a leadership role in helping guide the evolution of the Department's programs. We will be continually searching for ways to engage students in the operations of the department and the delivery of new resources (e.g., the "playroom" laboratory) to students.
Program Outcome 8: (Teamwork) Students will have the ability to function on teams.
This outcome is addressed throughout the core engineering program's Design Spine. Assessments of the Design Spine courses have not shown significant problems. One area that has been addressed at the School of Engineering level has been the issue of multidisciplinary teams engaged in capstone projects, where problems have been reported to the Design Committee based on instructor assessment of team performance. A focus group met on this topic in April 2003 and considered a proposition to include Business and Technology Curriculum undergraduates in engineering capstone projects. The benefits offered include an added commercial perspective and the skills that the business students can bring to enhance teamwork. A result is that for Fall 2003 a pilot with approximately eight projects in the School of Engineering will include Business students. In addition a set of project oversight guidelines have been developed for multidisciplinary project management and assessment.
CpE students participate in a substantial number of team-based, CpE-specific academic activities. Assessments of courses such as capstone design indicate no significant problems related to this broad outcome. One issue not yet fully resolved is how to assign separate grades to individual members of a project team, based on the contribution of each team member to the overall project effort. Approaches to address this issue will be pursued during the Fall 03 semester.
Program Outcome 9: (Communication) the ability to communicate effectively and persuasively.
This outcome is addressed throughout the core engineering program's Design Spine and in the core Humanities sequence. While not identified as a problem in any specific (core) course, high value is placed on communication skills by employers of Stevens engineering graduates as indicated in employer surveys conducted by Prof. Koen (see Section B2.4) and in feedback on program objectives by Advisory Committees of programs. To address how communication skills could be enhanced, a task group was established by the School of Engineering in Spring 2003 to outline a Communications Program for the Engineering Curriculum. This group benchmarked such programs nationally and reported in May 2003. Their recommendations include assessment of skills of incoming and outgoing students to track achievement of this outcome, some changes to Freshman Humanities requirements and the articulation of communication requirements within the engineering courses. Implementation in Fall ’03 is anticipated.
Evidence from CpE-specific course assessments, student presentations, preparation of Web pages for projects, and other measures all indicate that CpE students are proficient and capable in the technologies for presentation of their ideas. There are no indications of significant problems in meeting this outcome. There is some concern regarding the ability of students to communicate technically sophisticated issues related to design. This is seen as an issue in both CpE322 (Engineering Design VI) and in the capstone project sequence (CpE423/424) where design reports are often weak in the engineering depth of the designs. This will be addressed in these courses during the 2002-2003 AY.
Program Outcome 10: (Ethics and Morality) Students will demonstrate a critical understanding of ethical and moral systems in a social context.
The core engineering curriculum map shows that this outcome is not addressed adequately within the core engineering curriculum. To correct this, it is planned during summer 2003 to lay out a core ethics thread with recommendations for inclusion of the subject in appropriate courses, for example, where within the Design Spine might this be achieved? In general, this is a difficult outcome to assess quantitatively.
Through the several interactions we have with our students, a clear understanding of ethics and morality is seen in virtually all of our students. The only issue is how to best handle those who fail to behave appropriately with regard to this outcome. Just as in society as a whole, there will be the few who knowingly disregard ethical and moral themes while fully recognizing that they are behaving inappropriately. As discussed above regarding the Stevens’ Honor System, the ECE Department has a policy of not tolerating inappropriate behavior in a student’s activities related to completing homework, test, and project assignments.
Program Outcome 11: (Diversity) Students will demonstrate an understanding and appreciation of diversity and pluralism.
From the perspective of the core engineering curriculum, the Humanities sequence is relied on for part of this in the general societal context sense. No direct assessment has been applied to date. In order to ensure that all students have a basic foundation, all engineering students are now expected to take Hum 107 in Freshman Year. This course provides a broad introduction into how the modern world came to be for the societal, political, economic and cultural perspectives.
The undergraduate student population of Stevens is a highly diverse population, with a rich mixture of ethnic backgrounds and religious preferences. Immersed in this environment, the CpE students develop a sophisticated understanding related to this outcome. Though not measurable through course assessments, the comfort with which students of highly different backgrounds interact is one of the pleasing characteristics of the Stevens’ experience. In this sense, the presence of the student on the Stevens' campus is itself an educational experience related to this program outcome.
Program Outcome 12: (Life-long learning) Students will demonstrate recognition of the need for and an ability to engage in lifelong learning and development.
The engineering core curriculum map shows little that can be directly associated with this outcome within the core curriculum beyond the freshman seminar E101. The Humanities sequence plays a role but has not yet been brought into the direct SOE assessment process. It is a challenge to address this outcome in an assessable manner within the core engineering curriculum. The manner in which this outcome can be better addressed within the core has been placed on the agenda list for consideration by the SOE Education Committee for early Fall 2003.
There is significant evidence suggesting that students do recognize the importance of engaging in lifelong learning and development. In part, career paths no longer have the theme of a life-long job with a single company. Instead, employees are required to be versatile, not only to maintain a current job position but also to make the transition to a new position should that become necessary. CpE students appear to recognize this reality quite well. This outcome is not one directly achievable through a formal course but instead requires direct discussions with students related to the topic. The ECE director has introduced discussions with students regarding this outcome within regular classes over the past two years. The main objective of the discussions is to address the issues faced by students searching for a job position after graduation. Such general discussions have become increasingly important during this period of reduced hiring. The favorable response of the students to these discussions suggests that a more formal presentation be developed within the ECE department to address starting and sustaining a career. This will be explored by the Department with the intent of delivering effective information to the senior class during the Fall 03 semester. It is expected that the presentations will be formalized as workshops engaging the students, some faculty members, and some external professionals representing companies that routinely hire our graduates. The CpE alumni will be invited to participate in the "getting started and continuing" workshop. The challenge is to create a sufficiently stimulating and interesting event that a large portion of the students will attend (a large attendance being a primary outcome sought).
Program Outcome 13: (Entrepreneurship) Students will have a fundamental knowledge and an appreciation of the technology and business processes necessary to nurture new technologies from concept to commercialization.
No significant problems are apparent from core engineering course assessments. There is however a recognition that there is an opportunity to include more entrepreneurial assignments and content throughout the core engineering curriculum, especially within the Design Spine. In Fall 2003 for example, the major design project of E232 Engineering Design 4 was enhanced to require students to couch their project as a business opportunity, without detracting from the technical requirements of the project. Discussions have been held with an adjunct faculty member, who presently teaches an entrepreneurship general elective to seniors, on how appropriate modules might be included. These discussions are ongoing. A website was created in Spring 2003 that provides information and links on various aspects of entrepreneurship that could be useful for students.
The term "Technogenesis" defines the overriding theme of transitioning an idea from conception to practice that permeates the Stevens' research and education environment. A substantial number of programs have been developed at Stevens in support of this theme, ranging from summer research positions for undergraduates to integration of business courses with core curricula. Student awareness of the potentials of entrepreneurship to create start-up companies based on capstone projects is clear from the reporting and activities of students completing capstone projects. No significant deficiencies are seen in the CpE program with regard to empowering students to take advantage of this potential.

B4 Professional Component
B4.1 Major Design Experience based on Knowledge and Skills
B4.1.1 School of Engineering
As described in Section B2.4.3 and below, the major design experience within the Program consists of a three-course sequence of Engineering Design 6, 7 & 8. They build on the extensive foundation of a 5-semester core design sequence; with it’s coupling to core engineering science courses taught concurrently. Associated with the design sequence is a required 2-course sequence in engineering management, E355 and E421, the latter directly addressing the application of economic analysis to the capstone design project.
B4.1.2 Computer Engineering Program
Experience related to major design provided within the CpE program is largely provided by Engineering Design VI (CpE 322) preparing the students for their capstone design project experience (courses CpE 423 and CpE 424). A common cliche is that one has not developed into a strong systems designer until after completion of your first challenging system design (at which time the many complications confronting completion of the overall project become clear). Students beginning their capstone project design (typically the most challenging engineering design experience they have faced up to that point) face the reality of this cliche. During the Spring 2003 semester, the CpE 322 course was redesigned to provide students with an understanding of the challenges they will face in the capstone design project and how to best define a suitable starting point for that project. The instructor served as a mentor, providing the students with the stages of project definition in a systematic manner, including an emphasis on technical depth of understanding as the course’s final project proposal was being developed. Some deficiencies were noted during the delivery of this redeveloped course, and will be corrected for the Spring 04 offering of the course.
The capstone project consists of two semesters. The first semester (CpE 423) emphasizes development of a technical proposal addressing the real issues and barriers that will arise when the project is implemented during the second semester. One purpose of CpE 322 is to provide students with a chance to make substantial progress in the development of their project idea before starting CpE 423 (the project definition part of the capstone project course). The success in achieving this outcome will be assessed during the Fall 03 semester offering of CpE 423.
The two course capstone design/project sequence must be completed during the student’s last full academic year, with CpE 423 always offered during the Fall semester and CpE 424 always offered during the following Spring semester. All projects are required to be team-based projects, with the students identifying the team. Each team is responsible for identifying and arranging for a full-time faculty member to serve as the project’s advisor. The capstone project sequence includes a set of assignments, appropriate for the systematic selection, definition, and finally realization of the project. These assignments include completion of reports (progress and final reports) as well as oral presentations of first the proposal and then the completed project to the ECE faculty and the other capstone project students. At the end of the Spring semester, a “Senior Design Fair” is held in the Stevens’ Howe Center, where all senior projects (capstone projects) developed at Stevens are demonstrated. A total of 40 projects (Appendix I-F.5 lists the project titles) were completed by ECE students during the Spring 03 semester.
B4.2 One year (32 credits) of Mathematics and Basic Sciences
Table I-A.1 in Appendix I-A shows that the program includes 33 credits of mathematics and basic sciences in the SoE Core Curriculum alone and an additional 3 hours of math delivered in the CpE 360 Computational Data Structures and Algorithms course. Computer engineering has a strong coupling to physics and some required program courses (e.g., EE 471: Transport in Solid State Devices) might be regarded as part of the basic science requirement. Similarly, mathematical analysis is at the foundation of several of the topics taught, including CpE 462 (Image Processing & Coding). These courses have significant math content and part of their credit might be applied towards the basic mathematics requirement. However, the ABET minimum for math and basic science are met by the SoE Core Curriculum. For this reason, all required program courses offered by the ECE Department are mapped into the “Engineering Topics” category in Table I-A.1
All engineering students are required to take a core sequence of science and mathematics courses that totaled 33 credit hours in the 2002-2003 academic year (decreased to 32 credit hours in the 2003-2004 academic year). This consists of a two-course Freshman chemistry sequence Ch 107 and Ch 116 with associated laboratories Ch 107 and Ch 118 respectively (total of six credits), covering most of the topics found in the standard introductory college-level introductory texts.
Physics was taught over 4 semester during AY 2002-2003 (reduced to 3 for AY 2003-2004). These courses covered Mechanics (PEP 101 Term 1), Electricity and Magnetism (PEP 102 Term 2), Waves and Optics with some Modern Physics ( PEP 201 Term 3) and Modern Physics continued and Solid State (PEP 202 Term 4). A laboratory component for seven weeks each semester is spread between PEP 201 and PEP 202 (this has been revised for Fall ’03 to be one Term 3 14-week laboratory).
The mathematics core sequence comprises 4 courses taught over the first 4 semesters by the Mathematics Department plus E 243 Probability and Statistics taught in the School of Engineering. The four Math courses are:
Ma 115: introductory calculus and vectors.
Ma 116: integration, series, polar coordinates, functions of separable variables, partial derivatives, etc.
Ma 221: first and second order differential equations, Laplace transforms, Bessel functions and the use of numerical methods.
Ma 227 is multivariate calculus, Fourier series, matrices and determinants, surface and line integrals, integral theorems.
The core computing requirement has been addressed by CS 115 Introduction to Computer Programming, taught by the Computer Science Department. This course teaches basic concepts of computer systems, information networks and programming, including algorithmic thinking and problem solving, and application within a structured programming environment. (For Fall’03 this is replaced by E115 Introduction to Programming taught by the School of Engineering with integration of instruction in C++ to engineering applications including a robot design competition in E112 Engineering Design I in the 1st semester).
B4.3 One and one-half Years (48 credits) of Engineering Topics
Table I-A.1 in Appendix I-A. shows a total of 75 hours of credit in engineering topics, of which 22 credits are provided by required CpE-specific courses. Of the 75 hours of credit of engineering topics, 28 contain significant design and laboratory components. Not included in Table 1-A.1 are the project–related themes provided within individual courses, separate from formal laboratory components for a course.
Following is a description of the Design Spine courses and the associated engineering science courses in the core curriculum.
The sequence starts with a one-credit course, Engineering Design 1, taken by entering Freshmen. Starting the Design Spine from “day one” provides a valuable, early hands-on design experience to give both balance and context for what students typically perceive as the rather abstract nature of the courses in the traditional Freshman year. It is intended to immediately engage students and generate enthusiasm for engineering. It also sets the tone for their educational development.
The Design 1 course is taken concurrently with Engineering Graphics which takes a 3-D solid-modeling approach using SolidWorks. We consider this to be a major enhancement in the teaching of Graphics compared to the traditional 2-D approach and eminently suitable to help engage Freshmen engineering students.
The Design and Graphics courses are linked in a number of ways. For example, a plastic Logo plate is designed in the Graphics course and is then manufactured on a CNC machining center in the design laboratory. Linkage between Graphics and Design 1 is also apparent in a product disassembly workshop that involves comparing the parts of a cordless screwdriver to working drawings supplied by the manufacturer. This workshop also involves an introduction to free-hand sketching and to orthographic projections.
In this manner we establish the theme that is to permeate the Design Spine, namely that there is a measure of integration between the design course in a given semester and the engineering science (or science) courses taught concurrently or in the preceding semester.
A continuous sequence of integrated design experiences through the Spine is intended to considerably enhance the prospects for mastery of the competencies that the enhanced design sequence is intended to address and that are embodied in the goals of the curriculum. The integration is also intended to enhance the learning and understanding of science and engineering science concepts in the curriculum.
In keeping with the competencies desired of engineering graduates, the design spine includes an increased emphasis on professional practice topics of communication skills, teaming, project management and economics of design. These topics are developed progressively and reinforced throughout the design spine. For example, concepts of project management such as work breakdown and the Gantt chart are introduced early in Design 1 and used in a the design project (presently a robot project). The thread on economics of design is initiated in Design 1 through an assembly costing exercise as part of the product dissection workshop. The students’ experiences with group activity (often not positive) are used as a lead in to the more formal consideration of group dynamics starting in the second semester of Freshman year in Design 2. Effective oral and written communication is taught and tested throughout the Spine. Ethics is introduced starting with the 1st semester E101 Engineering Seminar.
While a degree of linkage is established between Graphics and the Design 1 course in the first semester, it is in the second semester that integration of design with engineering science is significantly addressed for the first time in the curriculum. During the curriculum development process it was decided not to attempt the high level of integration that has been implemented at some schools, such as Drexel University (E4 Program) and Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology (Integrated First Year). It was decided that the benefits demonstrated by integration at the schools mentioned (and others) could be achieved at Stevens through a strong linkage between the engineering science courses and a design course given concurrently or immediately after. In this regard it was considered not always necessary for the engineering science to be formally covered before its use in design. For example, simple truss analysis is used in Design 2 before it has been fully developed in the concurrent Mechanics of Solids course in the second semester. It can sometimes help students to recognize the need to learn the theory if they have first applied the analysis in a heuristic fashion to a design problem before formal coverage in lectures.
The Mechanics of Solids in the second semester is a 4-credit course that combines the traditional Statics and Strength of Materials courses from the previous curriculum. This is strongly linked to the 2-credit, 3-hour per week Design 2 course. This combination has students learning the theory of engineering structures while concurrently designing, building and testing structures. This also allows some topics to be introduced through the design course rather than first through lecture. For example, the concept of Factor of Safety is introduced and developed through an experiment in Design 2. Other experiments in Design 2 address Friction, Beam Bending, Effects of Stress Concentration and Buckling of Columns. The introduction and significant use of spreadsheet software for data analysis, including simple statistics, is part of the course. There are two design projects, the first of which is to design, make and test a simple truss. The second involves analysis of beam bending to facilitate the design of a gantry crane. The latter is a project that is used to link directly to and reinforce concepts covered in Mechanics of Solids, which applies a project-based learning mode via the crane as example.
Based on the positive experience in the design courses of the previous curriculum, we have continued with the use of engineering professionals as adjunct instructors for the Freshman design courses supported by undergraduate peer instructors. We continue to receive good evaluations from students for this mode of teaching design.
The integration continues in Semester 3 with the 2-credit Design 3 course linked to both a 3-credit Circuits course and a 4-credit Thermodynamics and Energy Conversion course. Again the design course reinforces material in the engineering science courses through the use of experiments and design projects. One example of this integration is in the area of phase change phenomena: The first experiment (saturation curve for pure substance - water), one of the design projects to design, build and test a heat-actuated water pump and the third experiment (binary-mixture phase equilibrium) are coupled with the classroom course. The p – T relations of saturation conditions for a pure substance are observed and measured and is also a topic taught early in the lectures, the continuity of temperature across a phase-change interface is observed, and the profound volume-change accompanying phase change is observed and used in design. The range of boiling points and their compositions dependence is observed for binary mixtures as is the easily observed difference between liquid and vapor compositions. The binary mixtures experiment is timed to link to the timing later in the lecture materials. Students also gain experience in multi-meter measurements of voltage, current and resistance, not merely at low-voltage and low-current electronics levels but at “power” levels (110 v., up to 10 amps) concurrent with their Circuits & Systems course
The 2-credit Design 4 course is linked to the Electronics and Instrumentation course given concurrently. Experiments and design projects promote significant use of computer-based instrumentation for data acquisition, analysis, signal processing and some introductory concepts of control. Vertical integration is made with software (MatLab, Simulink and LabView) used in other design and laboratory courses. Some of the same sensors that have been used in earlier design courses reappear here without the “black box” approach previously taken to their signal amplification and processing, etc.
The fifth design course, Design 5 (2 credits), is an evolution of an existing Materials Laboratory and is coupled to a 3-credit Materials Processing course. The latter replaces a traditional sophomore level “Introduction to Materials” course, with much of the materials science now covered in the revised chemistry and physics sequence. The laboratory course maintains many of the previous experiments, which already had a strong processing orientation. The laboratory also continues to emphasize the development of experimental skills and methods. In one module students apply what they learn in the lecture course about polymeric materials and composites to gluing metal together and to molding a fiber-reinforced polymer composite part. A second module involves reverse engineering a computer disc drive and identifying materials and processes used to make it. This requires knowledge gained in a number of parts of the lecture course. This product disassembly continues an approach used in Engineering Designs I, II & III to highlight the design process and the tradeoffs that are made in a commercial product. A third set of modules are directed at characteristics and manufacture of a solar cell. Again this links to content in the E344 Materials Processing course, but also links back to E231 Engineering Design III, where students experimented with solar energy conversion using a solar cell in relation to the Thermodynamics and Energy Conversion course.
The sixth design course is intended to address design topics specific to the discipline, as described below.
Components of professional practice/economics of design are developed throughout the Design 1 through 6 sequences, building in an evolutionary manner on the foundation that has been described for the freshman year. Figure B2.1, shown earlier, provides a view of the integration of the various elements of the core curriculum. It is through exposure to this material and associated experiences that many of the key competencies shown in the center box of Figure B2.1 are advanced. They are further developed in a two-course sequence (not shown in Figure B2.1), a 4-credit lecture/laboratory course E355 in Semester 6 and a 2-credit lecture/laboratory course E 421 in Semester 7. These courses allow for material that is best developed in that format rather than in the more distributed form of the earlier design courses, such as more advanced concepts of engineering economy and decision making.
Integration of Engineering Science and Design Spine Courses
As already described, an important feature of the Design Spine approach is the integration that can be achieved between engineering science and design courses taken concurrently. The initial development of the core engineering science and coupled design courses was undertaken by faculty teams that included in each case at least one member who had involvement in the content of both the engineering science and associated design course. In order to ensure that appropriate integration is maintained over time, faculty oversight committees have been established for each set of integrated core courses: E121/120/115, E122/126, E231/234, E232/246, E321/344.
B4.4 General Education Component
Humanities
All students take a sequence of eight, three-credit humanities courses, one per semester. These together provide a broad education in the liberal arts. They also help students meet the need for a broad education necessary to understand contemporary issues and to engage in life-long learning (ABET criteria j & i). Development of both written and oral communication skills is also a feature of the Humanities program.
The Humanities sequence offers a wide range of introductory and advanced courses in the traditional disciplines of literature, history, philosophy, the social sciences and the arts. There are distribution requirements such that the four freshman/sophomore courses include two courses from the literature or philosophy grouping and two from the history or social science grouping. Writing proficiency must be demonstrated as a graduation requirement [see Catalog] and students are guided to suitable writing intensive or remedial writing courses where needed.
It is possible with the addition of extra courses, which fulfill appropriate distribution requirements, to complete a minor in Humanities. It is also possible to achieve a BA/BE double degree.
Physical Education
Stevens has a tradition of requiring a significant component of Physical Education within the core curriculum. There are six required Physical Education courses commencing in Freshman Year. Students can opt for pass/fail or a letter grade. The philosophy behind the extensive requirement, that is almost unique in the U.S, is that we are providing an education, not just an engineering education. Further, that in keeping with the concept of life-long learning, exposing students to a variety of sports and other physical activities while in college is sowing the seeds for a lifetime of engagement for recreation and wellness.
Freshman Seminar
The E101 Seminar is a vehicle to introduce students to the study of engineering, engineering careers, success strategies, the use of Library resources, etc. Workshops on creative thinking and engineering ethics are included. The class is conducted in an informal setting with faculty meeting typically 20-24 students. As such it also provides an additional element of the advising system as the seminar leaders can be a resource to our new students. The class runs for the first half of the semester, meeting for about an hour per week.


B5 Faculty
B5.1 Adequacy of Faculty Size
The ECE Department is somewhat unique in its large proportion of new faculty members. The current faculty consists of ten full-time tenure-tract faculty members and one non tenure-track Distinguished Service Professor. In addition, Prof. Emil Neu, a Professor Emeritus, has continued to serve the department as an instructor for both core undergraduate and core graduate courses. A new junior faculty member (Dr. Cristina Comaniciu, presently a post-doc at Princeton University) has accepted an offer for a tenure-track position and will be joining the Department for the Fall 2004 semester. Two of the tenure-tract faculty members were on the ECE faculty staff prior to 1998 when the new ECE Director was recruited, at which time there was a total of four active full-time faculty members including two junior faculty members. The two junior faculty members left for personal reasons. Eight new faculty members (including the new Director) were recruited, providing an opportunity to select new faculty members in such a manner as to cover the needs of the ECE Department. Additional faculty recruiting is planned. The current faculty, including the new faculty member joining in the Fall 03 semester, is listed in Table B5.1.

Table B5.1. ECE FacultyPositionNamePositionNameFull Francis Boesch
Sumit Ghosh*
Harry Heffes
Stuart Tewksbury*AssistantRajarathnam Chandramouli*
Cristina Comaniciu*
Hongbin Li*
Hong Man*
K.P. Subbalakshmi*
Uf Tureli*Associate Yu-Dong Yao*EmeritusEmil NeuSpecial**Bruce McNair** New since 1998. ** Distinguished Service Professor. Non tenure-track, full-time.
During the selection of faculty candidates for positions, a major factor was to build the department’s faculty staff to provide the breadth and depth needed to deliver its program. In addition to providing coverage of the main components of the existing ECE/CpE curriculum, it was desired to recruit a mixture of new faculty members who could significantly impact the quality of the academic programs offered at the undergraduate and graduate levels. At the same time, it was critical that the new faculty hires provide growth in both the EE and the CpE programs of the ECE Department. To achieve this latter objective, several of the faculty members have expertise that overlaps both the EE and the CpE program and contribute strongly to both programs. For this reason, there is not a strict assignment of faculty members to either the EE or the CpE program. For internal development purposes, however, a general association of each faculty member with one of the two programs has been used. That association (recognizing that this is not a strict association) is shown in Table B5.2. This association of faculty members with programs is used mainly to define individuals who are appropriate for serving on various academic committees and to participate in various student-related activities such as advising.

Table B5.2. Association between faculty and programsElectrical Engineering AssociationComputer Engineering AssociationFrancis Boesch
Harry Heffes
Hongbin Li
Bruce McNair
Uf Tueli
Yu-Dong YaoSumit Ghosh
Rajarathnam Chandramouli
Cristina Comaniciu
Hong Man
K.P. Subbalakshmi
Stuart Tewksbury
This faculty has proven to be capable of delivering the core program of the computer engineering (and computer engineering) program for both the undergraduate and the graduate degrees. In addition, the faculty has proven to be effective in delivering traditional and developing new elective courses.
Overall, the ECE faculty is capable of covering the CpE program’s curriculum areas that have traditionally been highlighted by the Department (e.g., communications, analytic methods, etc) and the couplings to other academic units provides the capability of providing depth in several areas not traditionally emphasized by the Stevens’ ECE Department.
The primary challenge facing the ECE Department lies in the large number of undergraduate students completing its program. The result has been class sizes larger than desired, and in a few cases class sizes well beyond the size desired for presentation of advanced topics. Additional faculty hiring will help relax this problem but a longer term solution will be needed. This issue is under active discussion within the Department and a strategic plan to address the issue will be completed during the Fall 03 semester.
The ECE faculty has been fully supportive of fulfilling the needs for undergraduate student advising regarding their various activities. This includes the standard academic advising role but extends to other significant advising. With 40 capstone design projects completed during AY 2002-2003, the faculty was responsive in providing advising for most of these projects (the remainder advised by the capstone project manager, Bruce McNair). For the 2001-2002 academic year, Stevens’ established the “Technogenesis Award” for the outstanding capstone project completed at the Institute. Projects advised by Prof. Tureli have won the award for both the 2001-2002 and the 2002-2003 academic years. ECE projects have also won other Institute-wide awards. Faculty advisors for the Student Chapter of the IEEE (advised by Prof. Yao) and for the ECE honorary society Eta Kappa Nu (advised by Prof. Boesch) have been effective in reinvigorating these groups over the past three years. The ECE Department introduced a Bachelor’s with Thesis option in Computer Engineering for the 2002-2003 academic year and the faculty have enthusiastically provided the advisors for the student’s thesis topics.
One factor that has contributed to the ability of the ECE faculty to cover the needs of the Department has been the emergence of a team spirit among the faculty, senior and junior. Service activities are shared among the faculty and have been effective in execution. No deficiencies related to the service needs of the Department have been seen.
B5.2 Competence of Faculty
All faculty members aside from Prof. McNair have Ph.D. degrees. In the case of Prof. McNair, his extensive background as a research staff member with Bell Labs and AT&T Labs compensate for his lack of a doctorate degree.
With a large portion of the ECE faculty being early in their professional careers, it is natural that professional development is a priority in their activities. Over the past three years, the professional activities of the ECE faculty have advanced considerably. This includes not only successful competition for research funding (including the NSF CAREER grant awarded to Prof. Chandramouli) but also strong participation in several professional activities (conferences, workshops, proposal review panels, journals, etc.).
Development of the new faculty members into an effective team has been assisted strongly by the support of the senior faculty members. Two full professors are Fellows of the IEEE. The senior faculty members (including Prof. McNair) also have a record of significant industry experience (including several with extensive experience with ATT/Lucent Bell Laboratories).
Profs. Boesch and Heffes continue the tradition of the strong telecommunications theme of the ECE Department. New faculty members were selected based on a strategic plan (established in 1999) for development in three major areas, as follows.
1. Wireless Communications: This area represents an important extension beyond the traditional and well-established area of wired networks. The air interface creates considerable complexity in the behavior and characteristics of the link between wireless stations. Providing for data communication services with high QoS and covering not only voice but also data and multimedia is a major new challenge, offering major opportunities for research and innovation. Wireless communications has strong connections to computer engineering (e.g., transceivers, signal detection and estimation, etc) as well as to computer engineering (e.g., wireless networking protocols, secure data communications, etc).
2. Multimedia Systems: The broad area of multimedia information and networking represents an important frontier, enabled by increasingly powerful electronic components and more sophisticated software). Like wireless communications, multimedia systems topics overlap both the computer engineering and the computer engineering fields.
3. Information Systems: This area concerns the integrated infrastructure for communicating computers and end-user interactions with the systems. The specific topic of secure information systems has emerged as an important emphasis within this topic.
New faculty members were required to have substantial depth in one of these three areas and also overlap into one of the other two areas. A measure of the professional development of the new faculty members is seen by their significant success over the past year. Research grants totaling nearly $2M were awarded. The successful proposals included collaborations with other universities as well as individual proposals (e.g., the NSF CAREER award to Prof. Chandramouli). The rapid maturing of the young faculty members as both educators and researchers has been supported by the collaborative team spirit that they have developed.
The ECE faculty confronts the practical problems of serving a large undergraduate student population while simultaneously extending and sustaining their research and their professional activities. However, they have been successful in covering the curricular areas of the program.
B6 Facilities
B6.1 Classroom Facilities
B6.1.1 School of Engineering
In addition to having completely adequate traditional classroom capacity, the Institute has in recent years invested significant funds to create classrooms that foster collaborative learning and are set up to encourage use of laptop computers that can access the Stevens Network by hard connections at every seat as well as by wireless link. There are presently six such rooms, two in Pierce, three in Burchard and one in Lieb.
B6.1.2 Electrical & Computer Engineering Classrooms
The ECE Department, in collaboration with the School of Engineering, equipped a smaller classroom (Burchard 213) with an internal wireless LAN infrastructure and video projection capabilities to provide a classroom in which multimedia presentation of courses can be explored and deployed. The classroom holds about 30 students and has desks arranged in a computer room configuration so that students can use their laptop computers in class.
B6.2 Laboratory Facilities
The primary laboratories used by the School of Engineering and by the Computer Engineering programs are shown in Table B6.1. Brief descriptions of these and other available laboratory facilities are provided below.
Engineering Graphics Laboratory
The E201 Engineering Graphics Laboratory is set up with 22 networked stations that allow students to connect their laptops to a server hosting graphics software. An instructor station allows networked computer LCD projection.
Freshman Design Laboratory
The E 011 William R. Cumings ‘42 Freshman Design Laboratory was constructed in 1997 and is arranged such that two sections of 24 students can be accommodated concurrently by virtue of a center divider, while retaining contiguous access to central resources such as a teaching assistant station, stock room and storage areas. Each half of the laboratory has eight network-connected tables arranged around a central presentation area for both faculty instruction and student reporting using a computer-based LCD projector. Each section is constructed to promote group activity. Machine tools for cutting, drilling, grinding and sanding are provided on both sides of the divider. The laboratory is used for E121 Engineering Design 1 in the Fall and E122 Engineering Design 2 in the Spring. Required apparatus, parts, materials and instrumentation are stored in the stockroom and adjacent areas.
Warren and Ruth Wells Design laboratory
The MacLean 422 Warren and Ruth Wells ’42 Design Laboratory was renovated in 1998 to provide a modern chemical laboratory style environment with five benches hosting ten stations. All equipment is stored in an adjacent room. Drilling, grinding and sanding tools are located in the laboratory. This laboratory is dedicated to E231 Engineering Design 3.

Table B6.1: Laboratory Facilities for CpE Engineering ProgramPhysical FacilityPurpose of LaboratoryCondition
Adequacy for InstructionNo. of
stationsArea
(sq.ft)SoE Core LaboratoriesEAS Hall 010 & associated roomsFreshman Design E121 &122GoodNewly renovated facility and new equipment in 1998: Adequate for instruction162240McLean 431E 231 Design IIIGoodNewly renovated and new equipment in 1999: Adequate for instruction101566Burchard 126E245 Circuits and E232 Design IVGoodNewly renovated and new equipment in 1999: Adequate for instruction182247Burchard 310-14E321 Design VGood Modern facility: Adequate for instruction – needs some equipment upgraded2933ECE Program LaboratoriesBurchard 123CpE 390 Microprocessor SystemsGoodNewly renovated and new equipment in 1999: Adequate for instruction12Burchard 125ECE Student Project LaboratoryPoorIn process of being renovated (Summer 03)--
Elsie Hattrick Design Laboratory
The Burchard 126 Elsie Hattrick Design Laboratory was renovated in 1998 to provide a modern instrumentation laboratory. It is equipped with twelve stations that each consist of an instrumentation bench that has discrete Agilent instruments including, oscilloscope, multi-meter and power supply. Each bench has a networked computer linked to a server hosting LabView and MatLab/Simulink software. The computers have interface boards to allow A-D/D-A and subsequent digital signal processing. An instructor station allows for network connection to WebCT and other network resources as well as projection of these and other instructional materials. This laboratory is used for the laboratory component of E245 Circuits and Systems and for E232 Engineering Design 4.
Williams Cumings Material Laboratory
The Burchard 314 William Cumings ’42 Materials Laboratory was renovated in 1995 to provide a bright, modern laboratory suite to teach the core materials laboratory E321. It consists of five rooms that are equipped with modern facilities to serve the following purposes: microscopy, mechanical testing, materials processing, electronic device fabrication and testing and storage/ preparation. Each of the four main teaching rooms has a computer-based LCD projection system and whiteboard. The laboratory typically operates with one or two groups in each room on a rotating schedule to maximize utilization of the facilities.
Microelectronics Systems Laboratory (Burchard Building, Room 123)
The Microelectronics Systems Laboratory serves the ECE Department core course CpE 390 (Microprocessor Systems) and its laboratory component. This laboratory was fully renovated for the 2001-2002 academic year. A total of 12 student lab benches are available. Dell Optiplex desktop computers were obtained for each lab bench, with the Windows NT computer serving the Hattrick Design Laboratory also serving the computers in this laboratory. Oscilloscopes, function generators, multimeters, and power supplies are also provided for the lab benches. Presently, the laboratory primarily serves the CpE 390 course and, for this purpose, microcontroller boards (Motorola 68HC11-based) are provided for student lab projects.
The ECE Department is planning on adding resources in support of a project component being added to both EE 448 (Digital Signal Processing) and to CpE 462 (Image Processing and Coding). Evaluations of alternative digital signal processing boards are nearing completion and it is expected that these will be made available in the Microelectronic Systems Laboratory for the 2003-2004 academic year offerings of those courses. In addition, FPGA-based boards were acquired for the Fall 02 semester for use in the CpE 487 (Digital System Design) course. That course covers VHDL design of complex digital systems and the synthesis of those systems on FPGA (Field Programmable Gate Arrays). Starting in the 2003-2004 academic year, the Microelectronic Systems Laboratory will be used to support FPGA projects for this course.
During the Spring 03 semester, through a joint agreement between the Stevens’ ECE Department and Structured Networks Institute (Gabriel Akintayo), a significant collection of LAN networking hardware was delivered to the Microelectronic Systems laboratory. This networking hardware is available for development of “hands-on” networking projects for ECE undergraduates. The networking equipment includes 21 Cisco 25xx seried routers, 6 Cisco Catalyst 5000 series switches, a Cisco PIX firewall, and various other LAN equipment. This equipment is presently used for delivery of certification courses (CCNA, CCNP, and CCIE) to Stevens’ students. These certification courses are not for program credit. During the Fall 03 semester, the ECE Department will be working with Mr. Akintayo to develop and deploy a set of experiences using this LAN facility for ECE undergraduate and graduate students.
ECE Student Projects Laboratory (Burchard Building, Room 125).
Over the past couple of years, this modestly sized laboratory room has been made available for students completing capstone design projects, though it has not been renovated and the available equipment is rather limited. This laboratory deserves significant development and planning for upgrading the laboratory is currently in progress.
The School of Engineering received funding to acquire a significant set of equipment and instrumentation in support of providing more contemporary and capable laboratory facilities for capstone design projects. Included in the equipment acquired during the 2001-2002 academic year was a substantial amount of equipment and instrumentation recommended by the ECE Department. Constraints related to funding and other issues prevented deployment of this equipment during the 2002-2003 academic year. It was recently decided that the ECE Department will be charged with the deployment of the ECE recommended equipment that was acquired. This includes prototyping equipment for multilayer printed circuit boards (with plated thru holes), equipment for mounting components ranging from simple discrete components through high pin count VLSI surface mount components, and RF components. In addition, instrumentation such as oscilloscopes, spectrum analyzers and other instrumentation were acquired. One plan was to deploy all of this equipment in this ECE Student Projects Laboratory. However, concern regarding maintenance of the equipment suggests a different location (Burchard 205) where student access and activities can be routinely monitored. It is expected that these resources will be deployed for the start of the Fall 2003 semester and will be fully available for the EE/CpE 424 capstone project component in the Spring 2004 semester. Deployment of these capabilities is expected to have a major impact on the CpE (and EE) program.
B6.3 ECE-Specific Computing Infrastructure
The desktop computer infrastructure maintained by the ECE Department for the undergraduate program is that infrastructure deployed for the Hattrick Laboratory and the Microelectronic Systems Laboratory discussed above. A Windows NT server supports these laboratory computers.
The ECE Department acquired, with support from an industry donation, a SUN workstation that is dedicated to undergraduate use. Access to and operation of this workstation is managed by the ECE Undergraduate Student Council, in consultation with the ECE Department Director.
All Stevens’ undergraduates are provided with a laptop computer and a set of software packages. This program establishes a substantial “computing infrastructure” for use by the students.
The Institute-wide computing infrastructure is discussed in Section B6.4 below.
B6.4 Institute Information Infrastructure
The Information Technology department at Stevens Institute of Technology provides both Administrative and Academic services.
Administrative services include information systems planning, evaluation, implementation, orientation, system security, and maintenance. Functional administrative computing activities are decentralized to user departments who have a staff person responsible for reporting, data maintenance and integrity, training, and daily processing activities. In addition, the Assistant Vice-President for Information Technology is responsible for student data coordination by chairing the Student Information System (SIS) Team.
Stevens administrative computing may be categorized into three general areas; centralized information systems running on an OpenVMS Alpha system, networked servers, and PC-based office automation.
The centralized administrative systems at Stevens consist of student information and financial records systems. The student information and financial records systems are the Plus2000 Series licensed from Systems and Computer Technology Corporation (SCT). The SCT Plus2000 student information system includes components for processing billing and receivables, financial aid, graduate admissions, housing, registration, degree auditing, and student records. The financial record system includes accounts payable, fixed assets, general ledger, and purchasing. Payroll processing is handled by an outside vendor (ADP) with tape interfaces to the general ledger and financial aid components of FRS and SIS.
In addition to supporting direct administrative functional users and applications IT offers inquiry access to SIS and FRS to faculty and other administrators. Faculty and administrators can review student information and class rosters online and staff and principal investigators with budget responsibility have access to up-to-date financial data. Students and prospective students are able to gain access to their records, apply for admission, and register via the World Wide Web.
Stevens is implementing Campus Pipeline, a web portal, to allow customization of access to web-based information by students, faculty and staff.
The desktop automation activities supported by IT include word processing, spreadsheet, and database applications. These activities are carried out in both standalone configurations and increasingly on administrative network servers providing file and printer services. IT also supports a Windows Server based Human Resource application (HR-1 from Ceridian Corporation) and Special Function application from Northwind Software Corporation, a networked database in the Cooperative Education Office and Office of Career Services, and a PC-based caller identification system for the Wesley J. Howe Center Information Desk.
Academic computing
Academic computing services include providing network design, implementation, security, services, and support to assure a rich reliable, manageable, and maintainable campus network with 24x7 service availability. This includes secure access to systems and servers for computation (Attila), Internet access, email, ftp, web, printing, scanning, and campus PC labs. IT provides user assistance/help desk services and user training with a single point of contact including in-person, telephone (hot line), email, and knowledge based assistance for reporting problems and requesting/receiving assistance in the use of computing and networking resources. Support is provided for the primary web server including the design, implementation, and support of "top level" institutional pages as well as pages associated with information technology.
The Stevens LAN connects 48 buildings on the campus including all academic, administrative, dormitories and Greek houses via a fiber optic backbone.  The LAN which has been steadily upgraded since its inception in the mid 1980’s now connects the academic buildings and some dorms at gigabit speeds, while the rest of the dorms and the Greek housing are serviced at 100Mb.  Every student that resides on campus has a wired network port.  The LAN connects to the outside world through three links, a 5Mb link to a consortium of other academic institutions in New Jersey called the NJEdge.Net, a 15Mb link to the Internet and the 155Mb link to I2 via the vBNS backbone.  A majority of the core network was upgraded in 2002; a Cisco PIX 535R firewall and dual Cisco VPN 3030 concentrators provide increased security, a new Cisco 6509 Catalysis switch router comprises the main core, and a Packeteer PacketShaper 4500 and associated Cisco routers and ATM switches shape the traffic to and from the Internet to enhance the educational uses of the network while controlling the peer to peer applications that are flourishing in the Internet today.
Stevens Wireless Network
In order to serve an increasingly mobile computing environment on campus in which all undergraduates use laptop computers, the campus has an extensive wireless network. Members of the Stevens campus community may access the campus network and the Internet from wireless locations all across campus, such as outside and within academic and residential buildings, the cafeteria, outdoors on the lawn, and more. Stevens' implementation of wireless networking is an implementation of the IEEE 802.11b wireless standard.
Stevens Undergraduate Computer Plan
All entering undergraduates are required to have a laptop computer provided through the Stevens Computer Plan. This is provided on a lease basis. The computer is loaded with a bundled set of software programs chosen annually by a committee of faculty and IT Department staff. In additional to Microsoft Office tools, students are provided with tools that will be used in design courses and elsewhere including MatLab, LabView, Visual C++. Students also have access through client software to server-based tools such as SolidWorks and Cambridge Materials Selector. Laptops are issued with a wireless card.
Computer Service Center
This center, located in the basement of the Library, provides support to the undergraduate laptop program as well as Stevens’ owned computers used by faculty and staff. Service is provided under maintenance agreements. The Service Center also arranges for computer purchase and initial set-up with Stevens licensed software.
B6.5 Opportunities to use Modern Engineering Tools
B6.5.1 School of Engineering
The core sequence commences in 1st semester with the use of modern graphics software for solids modeling. Presently SolidWorks is the standard application learned by all engineering Freshmen. The client software is provided on all incoming students’ laptop computers and can be run anywhere by network connection to a server that controls the number of concurrent users allowed by the license. Matlab and LabView are also provided to students. Matlab instruction commences in the Freshman mathematics and continues through the physics courses and is also used significantly in E 232 Design 4, which is focused on electronics and instrumentation. The latter also introduces the use of Simulink provided with MatLab. Labview is briefly introduced in E 245 Circuits and significant instruction and use provided in E 232 in the context primarily of sensor data acquisition and signal processing.
B6.5.2 Electrical and Computer Engineering
Several ECE courses draw upon various engineering tools. Typically, the software tools are available through the Stevens’ Academic Computing program, with Institute-wide site licenses having been acquired for a wide range of software tools. The ECE Department has added software tools not provided through this institute-wide licensing arrangement. Electronic circuit simulations are supported by Circuit Design, a commercial package implementing the features of Spice using a user-friendly interface more sophisticated that the evaluation version of PSpice available from Orcad (an evaluation version used in ECE courses). Digital design is supported by the Xilinx VHDL software. A license for the full commercial version (Foundation Series) and the simulation environment (ModelSim) allows students access to the full versions of this design software. Xilinx provides a free “student version” of this software, which is used by most of the ECE students engaged in VHDL design and FPGA synthesis. Many ECE courses draw on MatLab, a mathematical package with several toolboxes that is well-suited for many engineering applications. An institute-wide license provides students with access to a basic version of this software. The ECE Department has a full version, and various toolboxes, which can be accessed by students when appropriate. Visual C++ has been adopted as the primary program development environment for use within the ECE Department. This software is available through the Institute’s license. Needs for additional design tools are continuously being evaluated and, as appropriate, acquired for academic use.
B6.6 Library
Stevens Institute of Technology and the Samuel C. Williams Library pioneered in offering "just-in-time" service tailored to the needs of the Stevens faculty, students and staff. This model maximizes use of Library materials and resources while effectively serving the information needs of our community. Using networked computers, students, faculty and staff can access bibliographic and full-text databases twenty-four hours a day, seven days a week. Information specialists are available to members of the Stevens community to assist in library research and to visit departments and classes for one-on-one or group instruction on the effective use of library resources. The Library has developed a set of web tutorials that all engineering Freshmen are expected to take in order to learn how to use the Library resources effectively and to do library research.
With access to the most advanced electronic delivery services, the Interlibrary Loan and Document Delivery Service can fulfill almost any request and effectively supports the research needs of faculty, students and staff. Furthermore, the Stevens community profits by a unique relationship with Engineering Information, Inc., owned by Elsevier, a major publishing company that produces the premier engineering research database. All of these services continue to improve with increases in collection size, easier electronic access and quicker turnaround time for delivery of documents, including instant desktop delivery. Indeed, with the "just-in-time" model, students and faculty now have access to a wealth of sources to consult in their research.
The Library Committee provides a link between the faculty and the Librarian and his staff. This committee is composed of faculty from various departments of the schools of engineering, science, and management. Members of the Library Committee have been active in articulating the research needs of their colleagues. They have proved essential as a sounding board for policy choices facing the Library, and they have been effective in pushing for an increased budget and, more importantly, normalizing the budgeting process for the Library.
The Library book collection (2001-2002) totals 113,541 volumes comprising 62,624 titles. The collection is kept relevant to Program needs by a process in which Program Faculty are solicited annually to direct the book purchasing of the Library. A book budget of $73,000 was fully expended in 2003 based upon faculty recommendations.
Perhaps the biggest challenge faced by the Library today is to get word out about resources available to students and faculty. In other words, the problem is less access to information, but more to convey to potential users what they have and how to use it. In this connection, Room 203 of the Library has been completely renovated since 1998. Then, it was simply another general purpose room, often used as a classroom. Today, it is devoted exclusively to Library training. In addition, Information Services Librarians are now regularly invited to make presentations to classes. The fact that Stevens is now a wireless campus means easy access to the Library Web page and to our electronic databases from which every classroom, all of which makes for an easy and effective teaching tool.
B7 Institutional Support and Financial Resources
B7.1 Adequacy of Institutional Support and Financial Resources
Institutional support and financial resources have been sufficient to assure quality and continuity of the program. A reasonable teaching load and sufficient teaching assistant support for those courses that require it, enables the faculty to assign and grade extensive homework problems and to have sufficient time available for students who need help.
B7.1.1 Sufficient to Attract and Maintain Well-Qualified Faculty
Faculty hiring and development is enabled by the Schaefer Fund, an endowment to the School of Engineering thanks to the generosity of the late Charles V. Schaefer. This fund is primarily directed to providing competitive start-up packages for new faculty. These packages provide for minimal teaching and service duties for new faculty in their first two years. They also typically include graduate student support for two years. In addition, they provide for significant resources to establish research capabilities to allow new faculty to compete successfully for funding and quickly build their research enterprise.
B7.1.2 Sufficient to Acquire, Maintain, and Operate Facilities and Equipment
The maintenance of teaching laboratories of the School of Engineering is the responsibility of the Engineering Services Group. This group is led by an engineer with considerable design experience. He is responsible for scheduling routing maintenance of the five core teaching laboratories as well as responding to requests from Programs for support of disciplinary teaching laboratories. The Engineering Services staff consists of three full-time technicians. In addition to Engineering Services, the Institute Machine Shop has a staff of two seasoned machinists whose primary responsibility is to the undergraduate programs. The Machine Shop staff conducts a variety of teaching programs for students. As part of the Freshman E121 Engineering Design I course they provide an introductory lecture on basic machining practice and safety to all first semester Freshmen. The lecture is followed by a machine shop session in which students practice the basic skills such as cutting, drilling, and tapping metal. The machinists also are available to provide more advanced instruction to senior students as they start to engage in their capstone design projects. They also spend considerable time assisting students with their design projects when needed.
B7.2 Process to Determine Budget
The budget cycle for Stevens Institute of Technology is July 1 to June 30. The Institute budget making process begins in early March. Department directors in consultation with program directors determine a departmental budget which is then presented to the Dean of SoE . The Dean and the Department Director meet to discuss the proposed budget where the Department Director submits a justification for each major budget item and adjustments are made. The Dean submits the proposed budget to the V.P. of Finance and the entire SoE budget is discussed in a series of meetings with the Operations Council at the Institute level. The SoE budget is then finalized and incorporated to the Institute budget which is then submitted to the Board of Trustees for approval via the Trustee Budget Committee. The SoE Dean subsequently discusses the final budget with each Department Director. In the case of shortfalls vis-à-vis the original budget proposed by the Department, the Dean provides funding from other sources (i.e. Schaefer Fund, Gifts Fund) to ensure that growth is maintained and the delivery of the program is not compromised. The budget making process is completed by the end of May.
B7.4 Acquisition of New Facilities
The Institute, through the considerable generosity of alumni donors, has renovated and equipped all undergraduate core laboratories in addition to most disciplinary laboratories as part of the implementation of the present curriculum, which graduated its first 4-year cohort in 2002.



B8 Special Program Criteria

The ABET program criteria specifically defined for Computer Engineering programs are addressed individually below.
A. Breadth and Depth Across the Range of Engineering Topics Implied by Title of Program
The School of Engineering Core Curriculum provides CpE students with a significant foundation in engineering disciplines, providing a strength that can be applied when the topics of computer engineering are being applied to diverse applications. The CpE core curriculum builds on this theme of breadth, providing students with preparation in analytic techniques associated with engineered electronic systems, backgrounds in both digital and analog circuits, experience in the use of microcontrollers for embedded systems, understanding of digital signal processing techniques applicable to communications and several other applications, and learning related to contemporary communication networks. The depth in the topics covered by the CpE core curriculum are supplemented by a rich set of elective courses (including graduate level courses) allowing a student to explore the details of a subject of his/her choosing. No deficiencies are seen regarding the achievement of this criterion.
B. Probability and Statistics
CpE students complete a core SoE course in probability and statistics during Term V. Representative applications in which students apply their knowledge of probability and statistics are image processing and coding (e.g., CpE462), network performance modeling and simulation, etc. No deficiencies are seen regarding this criterion.
C. Knowledge of Math through Differential and Integral Calculus
The four-course mathematics sequence completed during Terms I through IV within the core SoE program provide the basic preparation in these topics. Differential and integral calculus are fundamental to several CpE core and technical elective courses, through which the students receive continuing experiences in these topics. No deficiencies are seen regarding this criterion.
D. Basic Sciences, Computer Science, and Engineering Sciences
The full statement of this ABET criterion requires knowledge of “basic sciences, computer science, and engineering sciences necessary to analyze and design complex electrical and electronic devices, software, and systems containing hardware and software components.” No deficiencies are seen relative to the topics of basic sciences and engineering sciences. As discussed elsewhere in this report, there is a concern that CpE students are not receiving a sufficient level of preparation in the software aspects, in particular programming. This is currently being addressed both at the School of Engineering level (e.g., through the development of a new, core Freshman programming course) as well as within the CpE program (e.g., increased emphasis on the application of programming to problems in appropriate CpE courses to strengthen the student’s use of programming in engineering problems). In the case of embedded systems with hardware/software co-design, the core CpE course CpE 390 (microprocessor systems), with its accompanying laboratory component, provides students with backgrounds in assembly language programming as well as in the interfacing of external components to a microcontroller. Overall, the only weakness relative to this criteria appears to be in the programming skills of the CpE students, a weakness that plays a significant role in our planning course content and homeworks. It is expected that initiatives already undertaken will correct the weakness of several CpE students in the use of high level programming languages.

E. Knowledge of Advanced Mathematics
This EE-specific ABET criterion provides the examples of differential equations, linear algebra, complex variables, and discrete mathematics. During the Fall02 semester, an evaluation of the level of presentation of these topics within existing CpE core courses was completed. Although it was concluded that the intent of this ABET criterion were probably met by the presentation of the mathematics topics in other courses, concern did arise regarding the level of preparation of students in the area of complex variables. There were also some suggestions that the level of understanding of students in the area of discrete mathematics might be less than desired.
Rather than attempt to systematically integrate these math topics into the existing core curriculum, it was decided to deploy a new core course specifically targeting those mathematics and analysis topics not adequately covered in the core SoE math sequence but of importance in CpE courses (core and technical electives) that the student would be taking during the Junior and Senior years. That new core course (EE250) was deployed during the Spring 03 semester for students interested in completing the course and added to the AY 2003-2004 Stevens catalog as a required CpE course. With this adjustment, no deficiencies are seen with regard to this EE-specific ABET criterion.

Appendix I Additional Program Information
Table I-A includes that basic tabular information. Later tables include dept specific information.
I-A Tabular Data for Program
Table I-A.1. Basic-Level Curriculum: B.E. in Computer Engineering (2002-03 catalog).
Year;
Semester or
QuarterCourse
(Department, Number, Title)Category (Credit Hours)Math & Basic ScienceEngineering Topics
Significant Design (")General EducationOtherSemester ICH107 General Chem. 12(19.5 hrs)Ch117 Chem Lab 11MA115 Math Analysis I3PEP101 Physics I2.5E121 Engineering Design I 2 (x)E120 Engineering Graphics I 1 (x)CS115 Intro. to Comp. Science2 1 (x)HU Humanities 3E101 Seminar  11PE200 Phys Ed ISemester II(19.5)CH116 General Chem II3CH118 Chem Lab II1MA116 Math Analysis II3PEP102 Physics II2.5E122 Engineering Design II 2 ( )E126 Mechanics of Solids 4 ( )HU Humanities3PE200 Phys. Ed. II1Semester III(19.5 hrs)Ma221 Differential Equations4PEP201 Physics III2.5E234 Intro to Thermodynamics 4 (x)E245 Circuits & Systems 3 (x)E231 Engineering Design III 2 (x)HU Humanities3PPE200 Phys. Ed. II1Semester IVMa227 Multivariate Calculus3PEP202 Physics IV2.5 E 246 Electronics & Instrumentation 3E 232 Engineering Design IV 2 (x)CpE 358 Switch Theory & Logic Dsgn 3 ( )CpE360 Comp Data Struct & Alg3 HU Humanities3PE200 Phys. Ed. IV1(continued)

Table I-A.1 (continued)

Year;
Semester or
QuarterCourse
(Department, Number, Title)Category (Credit Hours)Math & Basic ScienceEngineering Topics
Significant Design (")General EducationOtherSemester VEE 471 Transport Phenomena 3 ( )E 344 Materials Processing 3 ( )E 321 Engineering Design V 2 (x)E243 Probability & Statistics3CpE 390 Microprocessor Systems 4 ( )HU Humanities3PE200 Phys. Ed. V1Semester VICpE 345 Modeling & Simulation 3 ( )E 355 Engineering Management 4 ( )CpE 322 Eng Design VI 2 ( x)TE Technical Elective 3 (x)CpE 462 Image Proc. & Coding 3 ( )HU Humanities3PE200 Phys. Ed. VI1Semester VIICpE 487 Digital Systems 3 ( )CpE 490 Info. Systems Engineering I 3 ( )Elective General Elective3CpE 423 Eng Design VII (Capstone) 3 (x)E 421 Eng Economics & Design 2 ( )HU Humanities3Semester VIIITE CpE Technical Elective 3 ( )TE CpE Technical Elective 3 ( )Elective General Elective 3CpE 424 Eng Design VIII (Capstone) 3 (x)HU Humanities3TOTALS-ABET BASI-C-LEVEL REQUIREMENTS38 hrs75 hrs30 hrs6 hrsOVERALL TOTAL FOR DEGREE 148 hrsPERCENT OF TOTAL26%50%20%4%Totals must Minimum semester credit hours32 hrs48 hrs satisfy one setMinimum percentage25%37.5 % 

Table I-A.2. Course and Section Size Summary: Computer Engineering (AY 2002-2003)
( * Includes both EE and CpE students in enrollment)
Course No.TitleNo. of Sections
Current AYAvg. Section EnrollmentType of Class LectureLaboratoryRecitationOtherCore SoEE245Circuits and Systems I468 75% 25%E246Electronics & Instrumentation465 100%Core CpECPE 358Comp. Data Struct. & Algorithms260 100%EE 471Switching Theory and Logical Dsgn265* 100%EE 348Transport Phenomena267* 100%CpE 345Microprocessor Systems370 75% 25%ECE 322Modeling and Simulation240 90% 10%CpE 390Engineering Desin VI1 124* 50% 50%CpE 462Image Processing & Coding192* 100% EE 359Digital Systems Design1130 75% 25%EE 465Information Sys Engineering I1162* 100% CpE 423Engineering Design VII282* 25% 75%CpE 424Engineering Design VIII281* 25% 75%Tech ElectivesEE 359Electronic Circuits126 100%ECE 440Current Topics in ECE210 75% 25%EE 448Digital Signal Processing143 75% 25%EE 465Introduction to Commun. Systems148 75% 25%EE 480Optical Fiber Commun. Systems115 100% ECE 485/486Research in EE/CpE I/II26* 100%CpE 491Information Sys Engineering II125* 100% CpE 493Data and Computer Commun.18* 100%  Table I-A.3. Faculty Workload Summary
(ECE Faculty)

Faculty Member (Name)FT or
PT
(%)Classes Taught (Course No./Credit Hrs.)
Term and Year1Total Activity Distribution2TeachingResearchOther3Frank BoeschFTE246 F02100%E246 S03R. ChandramouliFTCPE 493 EE 609 CpE 592WS F0240%60%CPE 491 EE 606 S03Sumit GhoshFTCpE 360 E 101 CpE 691WS F0230%60%10%CpE 360 CpE 345 CpE 691WS S03Harry HeffesFTEE 348 EE 605 CpE 655 F0280%10%10%EE348 EE 605 CpE 655 S03


Hongbin LiFTEE465 EE 663 F0230%60%10%EE 448 EE 616 S03Hong ManFTCpE 490 CpE645, F0245%35%20%CpE 462 CpE636, CpEWS645 S03Bruce McNairFTECE 345 ECE 423 F0250%5%EE 345 ECE 424 S03(Continued) Table 1-A.3. (Continued)

Faculty Member (Name)FT or
PT
(%)Classes Taught (Course No./Credit Hrs.)
Term and Year1Total Activity Distribution2TeachingResearchOtherEmil C. NeuPTCPE 358 CpE 643 F02100%50CPE 358 CpE 643 CpE 644 S03"K.P. SubbalakshmiFTE 245 CpE 591 F0230%60%10%E 245 EE 610 S03"""Stuart TewksburyFTE 245L* ECE 322 CpE 390L EE 471 CpE 487 CpE 560WS F0240%10%50%E 245L* CpE 390L EE 471 CpE 487 CpE 560WS S03"""Ufuk TureliFTEE 359 EE615 (3) F0240%50%10%EE 359 EE670 (3) S03"""Yu-Dong YaoFTECE 440 EE 651 F0230%60%10%ECE 440 EE613 S03"""




Table I-A.4. Faculty Analysis (Computer Engineering)
Name RankFT or PTHighest DegreeInstitution from which Highest Degree Earned & YearYears of ExperienceState in which RegisteredLevel of Activity
(high, med, low, none)Govt./ Industry PracticeTotal FacultyThis
InstitutionProfessional Society (Indicate Society)ResearchConsulting/Summer
Work in IndustryFrank BoeschProfFTPh.DPolytechnic Inst of Brokklyn (1963()R. ChandramouliAsstFTPh.D.Univ of South Florida (1999) 0 4  2.5 Med HighNoneSumit GhoshProfFTPh.D.Stanford Univ. (1985) 3 14MedHighMedHarry HeffesProfFTPh.D.New York University (1968) 28 13 13LowLowNoneHongbin LiAsstFTPh.D.University of Florida (1999) 5 3.5MedHighNoneHong ManAsstFTPh.D.Georgia Inst of Technology (1999) 0 3.5 3.5MedHighLowBruce McNairDSPFTM.E.Stevens Inst. of Technology (1974) 32 5 0.5MedLowMedEmil NeuEmt PTDr.Newark College of Eng (1966) 46 46Low none NoneK.P. SubbalakshmiAsstFTPh.D.Simon Fraser University (2000) 0 3 3Med HighNoneStuart TewksburyFPFTPh.D.Univ. of Rochester (1969) 21 13 5HighLowNoneUfuk TureliAsstFTPh.D.U. Virginia (2000) 0 2 2MedHigh LowYu-Dong YaoAsso FTPh.D.Southeast University (1988) 10 3 3MedHigh None
Table I-A.5. Support Expenditures: B.E. Computer Engineering

Fiscal Year1234(prior to previous year)(previous year)(current year)(year of visit)Expenditure CategoryOperations1
(not including staff) $86,700 $60,300 $87,700 $92,700Travel2 200 3,400 150 1,000Equipment3 28,800 16,300 14,300 15,000 Institutional Funds 28,800 16,300 14,300 15,000 Grants and Gifts4 0 0 0 0Graduate Teaching Assistants 322,500 325,600 443,900 491,400Part-time Assistance5 (other than teaching) 23,600 24,500 31,900 30,920
Note: Expenditures are for ECE department, including both its EE and CpE programs.



I-B Course Syllabi
1-B.1 ECE Course Syllabi
E 245 Circuits and Systems (Required)
Interdepartmental Engineering
1. Catalog Description: Ideal circuit elements, Kirchoff laws and nodal analysis, source transformations, Thevenin/Norton theorems, operational amplifiers, response of RC, RL, and RLC circuits, sinusoidal sources and steady state analysis, analysis in the frequency domain, average and RMS power, linear and ideal transformers, linear models for transistors and diodes, analysis in the s-domain, Laplace transforms, transfer functions. (2,3,3).
2. Prerequisites: PEP 102 or PEP 112. Co-requisite MA 226
3. Textbook: J. David Irwin, Basic Engineering Circuit Analysis, 7e, John Wiley, 2002.
4. Topics Covered:
Resistive circuits : introduction to circuit elements, Ohm’s law and Kirchoff’s law, single loop circuits, single node pair circuits, series and parallel resistor combinations, circuits with series and parallel combinations, Wye-Delta transformations, circuits with dependent sources.
Nodal and Loop analysis : nodal analysis, loop analysis, circuits with operational amplifiers.
Additional analysis techniques : linearity, homogeneity, superposition, Thevenin’s and Norton’s theorems, maximum power transfer
Capacitance and inductance : capacitors, inductors, their current voltage relations and their combination in series and in parallel, RC operational amplifier circuits.
First and second order circuits : first order circuits, second order circuits
AC steady state analysis : sinusoids and complex forcing functions, phasors, impedance and admittance
Magnetically coupled networks: Mutual inductance, energy analysis, ideal transformer.
Steady state power analysis : instantaneous power, average power and rms power.
5. Class/Laboratory Schedule: (14 weeks)
Lectures: Two 1 hour lectures/week. Laboratories: One 3 hour lab per week
6. Contribution to meeting professional component
Contributes to the “Engineering Science” part of “Engineering Topics”. See Course Assessment Performance Criteria (APCs) in Item 7 below
7. Assessment Performance Criteria
The students will be able to:
Solve DC circuits using Kirchoff's current & voltage equations (simultaneous linear equations). (1A1)
Determine the transient response of RC and RL circuits. (first order differential equations). (1A1)
Understand the concept of capacitor and its relationship to electric fields/parallel ; the concept of the inductor and its relationship to magnetic fields due to currents in wires and the concept of resistance and its relationship to charge flow under the presence of an electric field. (1B2)
Determine currents and voltages in circuits with voltage/current sources and R, L, and C components (circuits with passive components) ; apply circuit theorems (Thevenin's, Norton's, superposition, source transformation, parallel/series element combinations) to simplify the analysis of circuits and construct basic circuits and measure currents and voltages within those circuits. (1C4)
The student will be able to use oscilloscopes, function generators, multimeters, and power supplies in combination with custom circuits built using prototype boards for electrical measurements and characterization of electronic systems. (3C2)
Understand and use the Wye-Delta transformation on the circuits to analyze it. (4A4)
Use simplified equivalent representations (Thevenin/Norton equivalents) to evaluate the interaction between a complex circuit and external components. (4A4)
Understand the redistribution of voltage drops in resistive circuits with changes in values of resistors in series and the redistribution of current flow through resistors with changes in the values of resistors in parallel. (4B1)
Understand the changes in exponential voltage/current waveforms with with changes in the values of R, L, or C for RC and RL circuits. (4B1)
Understand the application of the superposition theorem to allow use of multiple voltage/current sources within a circuit. (4B1)
Understand the equivalencies of voltage and current sources when the transformation theorem can be applied (V-R in series vs I-R in parallel). (4B1)

Prepared by: K.P. Subbalakshmi Date : March 07, 2003

E 246 Electronics and Instrumentation (Required)
Interdepartmental Engineering
1. Catalog Description: Signal acquisition procedures, instrumentation components, electronic amplifiers, signal conditioning, low-pass, high-pass, and band-pass filters, A/D converters and antialiasing filters, embedded control and instrumentation, microcontrollers, digital and analog I/O, instruments for measuring physical quantities such as motion, force, torque, temperature, pressure, etc., FFT and elements of modern spectral analysis, random signals, standard deviation and bias (2,3,3).
2. Prerequisites: E245
3. Textbook: J. R. Cogdell, Foundations of Electrical Engineering, 2nd edition, 1995, Prentice Hall. F. T. Boesch, Complete Lecture Notes for E 246, 2000, Stevens Bookstore
4. Topics Covered:
Analysis of simple circuits containing ideal diodes.
Design of 1/2-wave & full-wave rectifiers.
Using Boolean algebra to find a polynomial switching function.
Error analysis of simple electrical circuits.
Design of a peak rectifier ( battery eliminator ) with a specified ripple factor.
Analysis of non-ideal diode circuits using piecewise linear circuit models.
Design dc bias circuit of a one stage transistor circuit, using d.c. circuit models for the transistor, to optimize the performance as an ac amplifier for both Bipolar Junction
Transistors and Field Effect Transistors.
Derive ac performance of single-stage FET and BJT circuits using a.c. circuit models for the transistor .
Design of electronic realizations of switching functions using various logic gates.
Design of an eight level simple analog to digital converter using comparators.
Analysis of the electrical performance of wheatstone bridges, strain gauges, position and pressure transducers, and thermistors.

5. Class/Laboratory Schedule: (14 weeks)
Lectures: Two 1 hour lectures/week. Laboratories: One 3 hour lab per week
6. Contribution to meeting professional component
Contributes to the “Engineering Science” part of “Engineering Topics”. See Course Assessment Performance Criteria (APCs) in Item 7 below
7. Assessment Performance Criteria (APCs)
The students will be able to:
Analyze simple circuits containing ideal diodes. (1A1)
Design 1/2-wave & full-wave rectifiers. (1A1)
Use Boolean algebra to find a polynomial expression for a general switching function. (1A2)
Perform an error analysis of simple electrical circuits. (1A2)
Design and analyze a peak rectifier ( battery eliminator ) with a specified ripple factor. (1C4)
Analyze non-ideal diode circuits using piecewise linear circuit models. (1C4)
Analyze and design the dc bias circuit of a one stage transistor circuit, using d.c. circuit models for the transistor, to optimize the performance as an ac amplifier. They will do this for both Bipolar Junction Transistors (BJT) and Field Effect Transistors(FET). (1C4)
Derive exact formulas for the ac Mid-band performance of single-stage FET and BJT circuits using a.c. circuit models for the transistor. (1C4)
Design electronic realizations of switching functions using various logic gates. (1C4)
Design an eight level simple analog to digital converter using comparators. (1C4)
Analyze the electrical performance of wheatstone bridges, strain gauges, position & pressure transducers, and thermistors. (1C4)
Design integrators, difference amplifiers, and inverting amplifiers using Op-Amps. (1C4)
Derive the relationship between the open-loop and closed loop gains of a feedback circuit. (1C4)
Derive the effect of feedback on sensitivity and bandwidth. (1C4)
Derive exact formulas for the frequency spectrum of the ramp, the half-rectified wave, the full-rectified wave, and the square wave. (1C5)
Design simple passive low-pass and band-pass filters using Bode plots. (1C5)
Design simple passive band-pass tuned circuits using the universal resonance curve. (1C5)
Derive exact formulas for oscillations in a second order systems with positive feedback. (1C5)

Prepared by: F. T. Boesch Date : March 12, 2003
EE 322 Engineering Design VI (Required)
Electrical and Computer Engineering Department
1. Catalog Description: This course addresses the general topic of selection, evaluation, and design of a project concept, emphasizing the principles of team-based projects and the stages of project development. Techniques to acquire information related to the state-of-the-art concepts and components impacting the project, evaluation of alternative approaches and selection of viable solutions based on appropriate cost factors, presentation of proposed projects at initial, intermediate, and final stages of development, and related design topics. Students are encouraged to use this experience to prepare for the senior design project courses. (1,3,2)
2. Corequisites: EE 345
3. Textbook: C.L. Dym and P. Little, Engineering Design: A Project-Based Introduction, John Wiley & Sons, 2000.
ISBN 0-471-28296-0
4. Topics Covered:
Initial "draft" selection of a technical project, then extend individual draft proposals into a group-proposed project.
Collection of technical information related to the project selected.and initial exploration of components (hardware and software) to be used to complete project.
Development of phase I technical description of project.
Search for barrier issues confronting the project and assessment of alternative approaches for implementing the project objectives.
Definition of project components and their interfaces.
Review of strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats related to project proposal being developed.
Development of phase II technical description of project, emphasizing engineering issues and design.
Critical evaluation of strengths and weaknesses of proposal from viewpoint of other class members.
Completion of the final project proposal, incorporating steps completed above.

5. Class/Laboratory Schedule: (14 weeks)
Lectures: One 1 hour lectures/week. One 3 hr "lab" per week.
6. Contribution to meeting professional component
Contributes to the “Engineering Science” part of “Engineering Topics”. See Course Assessment Performance Criteria (APCs) in Item 7 below.
7. Assessment Performance Criteria (APCs)
The student will be able to
(3B2) Efficiently locate information describing and assessing software tools for exploring the mathematical algorithms and techniques which are embedded in a student project.
(3B3) Locate information describing application-specific systems design and simulation software for a specific project and providing competitive assessments of commercial software tools.
(3B4) Use of standard search engines and keywords for an undirected search for information relevant to a specific project, familiar with the use of directed searches, starting fom a known-good site and searching for information at that site relevant to a specific project and familiar with resources for compression/decompression of information.
(4A2, 5B1, 5C1, and 5C3) Develop the design for a project using a hierarchical approach (top-down) and to apply successive refinement to their design, incorporating new information and insights into their design while adjusting the overall design for necessary changes.
(4A3, 5B1, 5C1, and 5C3) Adjust the overall design of a project to change a component to a different component or to add a new component, to develop a representation of inputs, outputs, and variables which can evolve from the incomplete initial understanding of the project design to the full and detailed representation of the design and to establish a "design, test, and build" process based on inputs, outputs, and variables defined by successive levels (hierarchical) of components and subsystems.
(4B1) Conceptualize the design of a project in terms of standard and custom components, subsystems using the components, and the overall system in quantitative terms, using design equations or other methodologies, including simulations, based on input/output behaviors and desired outcomes.
(4D1) Explore the design space of performance, features, and cost to determine the cost (fixed and operating) of a given project "product." (Also covers 5C2 and 5C3).
(5A1) Critically evaluate the impact of cost, features, and performance on the useful functionality of a project "product" from the perspective of a non-technical customer and will understand the importance of critically challenging his/her design and use assumptions to ensure exploration of alternative designs & features from the perspective of a final customer product.
(5A2) Explore the non-technical space of social requirements, with a particular concern for the social impacts (both favorable and unfavorable) of their project "product."
(5D1) (i) Use block diagrams and a hierarchical representation of the project at successively more detailed levels of description in providing a coherent and comprehensive description of the functionality of the project, (ii) use detailed circuit diagrams and interconnected component diagrams with technical specifications on inputs, outputs, and control to describe the detailed operation of components used in the project, (iii) include the results of simulations and other design aids in the technical representation of the project, and (iv) locate relevant reference information (tutorials & technical articles, related products/projects, etc.) and will include appropriate references to all such information that is relevant to the project.
(5E1) Explore project areas based upon non-technical issues related to novelty, innovation, and creative potential solutions to problems and will critically assess the viability and practical demonstration of conceived projects based on exploration of the technical issues and the available components for a project.
(6A1) Apply the principles of concurrent design in the breakdown of tasks and project plans and will understand and apply Gantt chart and PERT/CPM (either or both) in the creation of a breakdown of tasks and planning the activities to complete the project.
(7A1) participate in a modest-sized team to develop initial ideas into a full project, with the final Pbjectives of the team evolving from the collaboration rather than being defined a-priori.

Prepared by: S. Tewksbury Date : March 23, 2003
EE 345 Modeling and Simulation (Required)
Electrical and Computer Engineering Department
1. Catalog Description: Development of deterministic and non-deterministic models for physical systems, engineering applications, and simulation tools for deterministic and non-deterministic systems. Case studies and projects. (2,0,2)
2. Prerequisites by Topic
Probability and random variables
Calculus
Knowledge of high-level programming language (Preferable C/C++ or Matlab)
3. Textbook:
Required: Banks, Carson, Nelson & Nichol, Discrete Event System Simulation, Prentice Hall, ISBN 0-13-088702-1, 2001.
Recommended: Palm, Introduction to Matlab 6 for Engineers, McGraw-Hill, ISBN 0-07-234983-2, 2001.
Course Web Site: http://koala.stevens-tech.edu/~bmcnair/modeling_and_simulation-S03
4. Topics Covered:
Event-driven simulation
Simulation in high level language (C, C++, Pascal, Fortran)
Simulation packages (Matlab/Simulink)
Statistical models
Queuing models
Random number generation, random variate generation
Input Modeling: collecting data, identifying distribution, parameter estimation, goodness-of-fit
Verification and validation of simulation models
Output Analysis: types of simulation with respect to output analysis, stochastic nature of output data, measures of performance, termination simulations, steady-state simulations

5. Class Schedule: Two 1 hour lectures/week.
6. Contribution to meeting professional component
Contributes to the “Engineering Science” part of “Engineering Topics”. See Course Assessment Performance Criteria (APCs) in Item 7 below
7. Assessment Performance Criteria (APCs)
The student will be able to (i) develop a mathematical representation of a process/system based on critical parameters related to the physical realization and the operation of the process/system and (ii) understand the representation of a physical process/system in terms of mathematically defined performance, cost, and other specifications. (1A1)
The student will be able to (i) establish a quantitative model of a physical process/system and understand the approximations involved in obtaining a useful but simplified mathematical representation of the process/system and will understand the basic numerical analysis techniques through which the behavior of a process/system can be simulated. (1A2)
The student will be able to (i) relate the results of modeling and simulation to a real process or system and (ii) understand the role of first-order and higher-order approximations to a physical system and the relevance of higher-order effects in obtaining meaningful simulation results. (1A3)
The student will be able to (i) represent mathematical and software simulation approaches in terms of the flow of steps by means of flow charts and (ii) understand the concept of hierarchical models of processes and systems through use of hierarchically represented flow charts. (1A4)
The student will be able to apply Web-based multimedia technologies to present and develop modeling and simulation results in a team-based development environment and will use Web-based and other multimedia technologies as a means of maintaining a record of modeling and simulations activities in a project. (3B1)
The student will be able to (i) apply commercial simulation software (e.g., PSpice, OPNET, etc.) to the simulation of a given process or system, (ii) apply mathematical software (e.g., MatLab, Mathematica, MathCad) for mathematical modeling and simulation of a given process or system, (iii) apply spreadsheet software (e.g., Excel) for maintaining data records and displaying data in graphical form, and (iv) develop simple programs (e.g., C++) for the numerical modeling and analysis of a given process or system. (3B2)
The student will be able to (i) select parameter values for simulations of real processes/systems consistent with the variations in such parameters due to manufacturing and other implementation variations (ii) include "environmental" variations such as additive noise in the modeling and simulation process, and evaluate the quality of the simulation results with respect to a real system. (3B3)
The student will be able to identify the many influences (desired and other "inputs") on a real world process/system and isolate the relevant inputs, outputs, and operating variables to support meaningful modeling and simulation. (4A2)
The student will be able to (i) apply mathematical and engineering models to establish a cause and effect relationship between inputs and outputs of a process/system and (ii) use experimental data to estimate the changes in the output(s) of a system due to changes in inputs/variables without requiring an analytical model of the process/system. (4A3)

Prepared by: Bruce McNair Date : March 4, 2003 CpE 358 Switching Theory and Logic Design (Required)
Electrical and Computer Engineering Department
1. Catalog Description: Digital systems, number systems and codes, Boolean algebra, application of Boolean algebra to switching circuits, minimization of Boolean functions using algebraic, Karnaugh map, and tabular methods, design of combinational circuits, programmable logic devices, sequential circuit components, design and analysis of synchronous and asynchronous sequential circuits. (3-0-3)
2. Prerequisites: CS 115
3. Textbook: M. Morris Mano, Digital Design, Third Edition, Prentice Hall, Engelwood Cliffs, NJ, 2002.
4. Topics Covered
Fundamental concepts of digital systems
Binary codes
Boolean algebra
Switching algebra
Simplification of switching expressions
Combinational logical design including LSI implementation
Sequential logic analysis and design
Counters
Memory and Programmable Logic

5. Class Schedule: Three 1 hour lectures/week.
6. Contribution to meeting professional component
Contributes to the “Engineering Science” part of “Engineering Topics”. See Course Assessment Performance Criteria (APCs) in Item 7 below.
7. Assessment Performance Criteria (APCs)
The student will be able to
Understand number systems and codes and their application to digital circuits; understand Boolean algebra and its application to the design and analysis of digital circuits. (1A2)
Represent digital systems as interconnected subsystems with digital I/O, input/output relationships of combinational logic, and the representation of a sequential circuit as a combinational circuit with internal storage. (4A2)
Understand the mathematical and physical characteristics of logic gates. (4A3)
Design and represent logic circuits using standard "schematic" representations of digital circuits with components and interconnections represented in conventional schematic form. (4A4)
Use truth tables, Boolean algebra, Karnaugh maps, and the Quine-McCluskey Method to obtain design equations. (4B1)
Use design equations to design combinational and sequential circuits consisting of gates and flip-flops (4C1)
Combine combinational circuits and flip-flops to design combinational and sequential systems. (5B1)
Produce a technical drawing, including interconnections and component parts, of a digital system function design. (5D1)
Consider alternatives to traditional design techniques to simplify the design process to yield innovative designs. (5E1)

Prepared by: Emil Neu Date: April 20, 2003

CpE 360 Computational Data Structures and Algorithms (Required)
Electrical and Computer Engineering Department
1. Catalog Description: The role of data structures and algorithms in the real world; principles of programming including the topics of control flow, recursion, and I/O; principles of computational intelligence; topics from elementary data structures including arrays, lists, stacks, queues, pointers, strings; searching and sorting; data structures for concurrent execution; topics from elementary algorithms including analysis of algorithms and efficiency, computational complexity, empirical measurements of computational complexity of algorithms, proof techniques including induction; selected topics from advanced algorithms including distributed algorithms; programming laboratory exercises and projects. (3-0-3)
2. Prerequisites: Working knowledge of C++
3. Textbook: (None)
4. Topics Covered
The role of data structures and algorithms in the real world; principles of programming including the topics of control flow, loops, recursion, and I/O; principles of computational intelligence; topics from elementary data structures including arrays, lists, stacks, queues, pointers, strings; searching and sorting; data structures for concurrent execution; topics from elementary algorithms including analysis of algorithms and efficiency, computational complexity, empirical measurement of computational complexity of algorithms, proof techniques including induction; selected topics from advanced algorithms including distributed algorithms; programming laboratory exercises and projects.

5. Class Schedule: Two 1.5 hour lectures/week
6. Contribution to meeting professional component
Contributes to the “Core computer engineering” part of “Engineering Topics”. See Course Objectives in Item 7 below.
7. Assessment Performance Criteria (APCs)
(1A2) The student will be able to understand and use arrays and pointers-based linked lists to implement and manipulate stacks and queues.
The student will be able to understand proof techniques relative to algorithmic correctness.
The student will be able to understand the representation and manipulation of trees and graphs in the computer.
The student will be able to understand the theory underlying computational complexity of algorithms.
(1A3) The student will be able to translate an algorithm into an executable program.
(1A5) The student will be able to understand the relationship between data structures and algorithms in developing a program to solve compute-intensive problems.
(3B2) The student will be able to determine what data structures to select to solve a given problem.
The student will be able to conceive metrics to assess the effectiveness of algorithms and programs. For ill-defined problems, the student will be able to identify heuristics and determine methods to measure heuristic effectiveness.
(3B3) The student will be able to conceive the high-level architecture and then synthesize the appropriate combination of algorithm and data structures to solve a given real-world problem.

Prepared by : Sumit Ghosh Date : March 12, 2003
CpE 390 Microprocessor Systems (Required)
Electrical and Computer Engineering Department
1. Catalog Description: A study of the implementation of digital systems using microprocessors. The architecture and operation of microprocessors is examined in detail along with I/O interfacing, interrupts, DMA and software design techniques. Specialized controller chips for interrupts, DMA, arithmetic processing, graphics and communications will be discussed. The laboratory component introduces hardware and software design of digital systems using microprocessors. Design experiments include topics such as bus interfacing, memory decoding, serial communications and programmable ports.. (3-3-4)
2. Prerequisites: CpE 358
3. Textbook:
H-W. Huang, MC68HC11: An Introduction, Delmar Thomson Learning, ISDN 0-7668-1600-1, 2000.
Wayne Wolf, Computers as Components: Principles of Embedded Computing Systems Design, Morgan Kaufmann Publishers, ISBN 1-55860-541-X, 2000.
4. Topics Covered
Programmer's model of microprocessor
Addressing modes
Arithmetic, logic, and related assembly instructions
Branch and subroutine instructions
Conditional instructions (loops)
Assembly language programming
Assembler commands
Laboratory project using the Motorola MC68HC11 microprocessor evaluation board
Interrupts and polling
Interfacing peripherals to a microprocessor
Introduction to 32-bit RISC microprocessors
Introduction to operating systems for advanced microprocessors
Multiprogramming principles
Interprocess communications

5. Class Schedule: Three 1 hour lectures/week. One 3 hr laboratory/week
6. Contribution to meeting professional component
Contributes to the “Engineering Science” part of “Engineering Topics”. See Course Objectives in Item 7 below.
7. Assessment Performance Criteria (APCs)
The student will be able to
represent computational/control problems as assembly language programs using conventional flow chart representations with standard flow control elements. (1A4)
decompose an overall computation/control problem into a set of representative assembly language subprograms, organized according to the representation of data as stored data (RAM) and the flow of data and control among the subprograms. (1A5)
The student will be able to apply basic DC circuit analysis techniques to the design and construction of microprocessors interfaced to analog signals through analog-to-digital and digital-to-analog converters. (1C4)
The student will be able to interpret and apply the specifications (dynamic range, quantizing accuracy, etc.) of analog-digital converters. (2C1)
The student will be able to select quantizing accuracy and number of digits to minimize the effects of amplitude overflow in analog-to-digital converters. (2C2)
The student will be able to use microprocessor simulation software to simulate the execution of microprocessor programs. (3B3)
The student will be able to use Web-based resources to obtain information related to microprocessor circuits, their applications, and interface circuits. (3B4)
The student will be able to define the primary input/output variables of microprocessor-based systems and to determine temporary state variables within the context of microprocessor memory organizations. (4A2)
The student will be able to develop assembly language programs for microprocessor-based systems to implement algorithms (computational and control) with programmable functionality. (4A3)
The student will be able to represent the relationships between the software model (programmer's model) of a microprocessor and the hardware components (CPU, memory, interrupts, etc.) of a microprocessor system. (4A4)
The student will be able to develop microprocessor programs supporting external input/output of data and the systematic organization of data in the microprocessor system's memory. (4B1)
The student will be able to develop microprocessor applications using external I/O interfaces controlled by user inputs on a keyboard and feedback to the user on a monitor. (4B2)
The student will be able to explore alternative organizations of data structures in memory to facilitate the execution of programs using data structures (arrays, lists, etc.). (5B1)

Prepared by S. Tewksbury Date: March 3, 2003
EE/CpE 423/423 Engineering Design VII/VIII (Required)
Electrical and Computer Engineering Department
1. Catalog Description:
EE423: The development of design skills and engineering judgement, based upon previous and current course and laboratory experience, is accomplished by participation in a design project. Projects are selected in areas of current interest such as communication and control systems, signal processing, and hardware and software design for computer based systems. To be taken during the student’s last Fall semester as an undergraduate student.. (0,8,3)
EE424: A continuation of EE 423 in which the design is implemented and demonstrated. This includes the completion of a prototype (hardware and/or software), testing and demonstrating the performance, and the evaluation of results. To be taken during the student’s last Spring semester as an undergraduate student.. (0,8,3)
2. Prerequisites: EE 322. E 421 is corequisite of EE 423. EE/CpE 423 is prerequisite of EE/CpE 424
3. Textbook: (None)
Web site: http://koala.stevens-tech.edu/~bmcnair/senior_design-02-03
4. Topics Covered

Fall Semester (EE/CpE 423
Formation of teams, identification of project idea
Identifying faculty advisor, planning work division
Stages of a development project, suitable type of senior design project
Documentation requirements, web site needs, weekly reports
Presentation requirements, guidelines, suggestions for effective presentation Senior Design Fall PresentationsSpring Semester (EE/CpE 424
Second semester deliverables
Group status
Demo requirements
Preparation for Design Day

During the Fall semester, students form project groups and develop a project proposal. During the Spring semester, the group completes their proposed project.
5. Class Schedule: Typically 1 hour lectures/week with course instructor. Regular meetings as needed with project group's faculty advisor(s) and, when appropriate, sponsor(s).
6. Contribution to meeting professional component
Contributes to a variety of professional components. See assessment criteria below.
7. Assessment Performance Criteria (APCs)
The following list is an abridged set of CpE 423/424 APCs. This course covers a large number of CpCs and the course web site provides the full set. The student will be able to
The student will be able to apply and/or extend/develop mathematical models to assess and present project design and implementation decisions in a quantitative manner. (1A3)
The student will be able to apply and/or extend/develop flow charts representing algorithmic principles appropriate to the project design and implementation. (1A4)
The student will be able to apply multimedia design tools for the development of presentations and Web sites describing the project, progress in the design of the project, and major issues related to that design. (3B1)
The student will develop the design for a project using a hierarchical approach (top-down) and will apply successive refinement to their design and implementation, incorporating new information and insights into their design while adjusting the overall design for necessary changes. (4A2, 5B1, 5C1, and 5C3).
The student will be able to (i) adjust the overall design of a project to change a component to a different component or to add a new component and (ii) develop a representation of inputs, outputs, and variables which can evolve from the incomplete initial understanding of the project design. (4A3)
The student will be able to decompose the overall project function into subfunctions (connected in parallel, series, and/or feedback) to establish the components used to implement the project. (4C1)
The student will be able to critically evaluate the impact of cost, features, and performance on the useful functionality of a project "product" from the perspective of a non-technical customer and will understand the importance of critically challenging his/her design and use assumptions to ensure exploration of alternative designs & features from the perspective of a final customer product. (5A1)
The student will be able to understand and apply formal team-based project design techniques used to stimulate creative and innovative approaches to solving problems and the critical assessment of approaches emerging from such techniques. (5E2)
The student will be able to evaluate and apply principles of "different views" to the development of the project design, including exploration of different uses of the project and the impact of those different uses in the definition and realization of the project. (5E3)
The student will understand and apply the principles of concurrent design in the breakdown of tasks and project plans and will understand and apply Gantt chart and PERT/CPM (either or both) in the creation of a breakdown of tasks and planning the activities to complete the project. (6A1)
The student will understand and apply time management principles for team-based projects. (6A2)
The student will participate in a modest-sized team to develop initial ideas into a full project, with the final objectives of the team evolving from the collaboration rather than being defined a-priori. (7A1)
The student will be responsive to suggestions and criticisms emerging within the team as a natural element of exploring the design space but will practice standard techniques through which the team can maintain its focus on their common objective related to the project. (7A2)

Prepared by Bruce McNair Date: March 3, 2003
CpE 462 Introduction to Image Processing and Coding s (Required)
Electrical and Computer Engineering Department
1. Catalog Description: Introduction to Image Processing and Coding Image acquisition, storage, image formation, sampling, basic relationship between pixels, imaging geometry, segmentation: edge detection, edge linking and boundary detection, Hough transform, region growing, thresholding, split and merge, histogram matching, representation: chain code, polygonal approximation and skeletonization, thinning algorithms, texture, image compression: elementary discussion of motion vectors for compression, discussion of industry standards such as JEPG and MPEG. (3-0-3)
2. Prerequisites: EE348
3. Textbook: Rafael C. Gonzalez, Richard E. Woods (Eds), Digital Image Processing, 2nd edition, Prentice Hall 2002; ISBN: 0201180758
4. Topics Covered
Introduction to Signal and Image Processing
Digital Signal Processing Fundamentals: Signals and systems; signal representation and Fourier transform; sampling theory; FIR and IIR filtering
Two-Dimensional DSP: 2-D signals and systems; 2-D filters and filtering; 2-D Discrete Fourier Transform; 2-D Discrete Cosine Transform
Image Perception and Representation: Human visual system; light, brightness, contrast; color modeling and representation
Image Enhancement: Arithmetic operations; Intensity transforms; histogram and histogram equalization; smoothing and sharpening through 2-D filtering
Image Analysis: Point, line and edge detection; segmentation and thresholding
Geometric Processing: Interpolation and down-scaling; rotation
Digital Halftoning: Patterning; dithering; error Diffusion
Image Coding: Quantization; entropy coding; compression standards
Term Project: This course includes a significant student project.
5. Class Schedule: One 3 hr lecture/week.
6. Contribution to meeting professional component
Contributes to the “Engineering Science” part of “Engineering Topics”. See Course Objectives in Item 7 below.
7. Assessment Performance Criteria (APCs)
(1A2) The students will be able to follow the general mathematical concepts of a derivation of an engineering or scientific result and will possess the mathematical skills to link those concepts.
(1A3) The students will be able to understand the relevance of the mathematical results to physical applications.
(1A4) The students will be able to articulate algorithmic thinking through flow charts.

(1C5) Both inside and outside their major, students will be able to analyze dynamical systems in the frequency domain.
(3B2) Students will be able to use computer-based and information technology-based tools. Students will have the ability to effectively use computational tools for finding graphical, numerical, statistical, and analytical solutions to problems;
(3B3) Students will have the ability to systems simulations appropriate to engineering practice.
(4A3) Students will be able to identify technical relationships between the input, output and variables and use the relationships to predict mutual changes.
(4B1) Students will be able to utilize design equations to specify units or components. Given appropriate input and desired outputs, the students will be able to specify the characteristics of the component or unit required for its construction or acquisition.
(5E1) Students will be able to adopt imaginative and innovative approaches to the design process. The students will be able apply creative and critical thinking skills.
(5E3) Students will be able to implement diverse problem solving strategies.

Prepared by : H. Man Date : March 10, 2003



EE 471 Transport in Solid State Devices (Required)
Electrical and Computer Engineering Department
1. Catalog Description: Introduction to the underlying phenomena and operation of solid state electronic, magnetic, and optical devices essential in the functioning of computers, communications and other systems currently being designed by engineers and scientists. Charge carrier concentrations and their transport are analyzed from both microscopic and macroscopic viewpoints, carrier drift due to electric and magnetic fields in solid state devices are formulated, and optical energy absorption and emission is related to the energy levels in solid-state materials. Diffusion, generation, and recombination of charge carriers are combined with carrier drift to produce a continuity equation for the analysis of solid state devices. Explanations and models of the operation of PN, metal-oxide, metal-oxide-semiconductor, heterostructure junctions are used to describe diode, transistor, photodiode, laser, integrated circuit and other device operation. (3,0,3)
2. Prerequisites: EE 246
3. Textbook: S.M. Sze, Semiconductor Devices: Physics and Technologies, John Wiley & Sons, Inc., ISBN 0-471-33372-7, 2001.
Course Web Site: http://stewks.ece.stevens-tech.edu/EE471-S03/
4. Topics Covered
Energy bands, equilibrium carrier concentrations, intrinsic and extrinsic carrier densities, Fermi levels.
Conduction due to electric fields and to diffusion.
Carrier generation, carrier recombination, and current continuity
Direct and indirect gap semiconductors
Junction diodes, equilibrium and non-equilibrium.
Bipolar transistor current flow.
MOS capacitors and transistors
MOSFET digital logic (NMOS and CMOS)
Photonic devices (photodetectros, LED, laser)
Ssemiconductor sensors

5. Class Schedule: Two 1.5 hour lectures/week
6. Contribution to meeting professional component
Contributes to the “Engineering Science” part of “Engineering Topics”. See Course Objectives in Item 7 below.
7. Assessment Performance Criteria (APCs)
(1A1) The student will understand the mathematical foundations of semiconductor electronic and optoelectronic devices through which the engineering models of such devices are obtained from the underlying physical properties of the semiconductors and their external excitation.
(1A2) The student will understand the role of engineering-oriented mathematical models of semiconductor devices through which the design, fabrication specifications, and performance are quantitatively established.
(1A3) The student will understand the relationship between the circuit models of electronic and optoelectronic devices and the mathematical models connecting the behavior of the devices to physical device parameters.
(1B1) The student will understand the role of momentum conservation (in the k-space of the quantum mechanical description of momentum-energy relations) in the ability of a semiconductor to generate light through direct-gap recombination.
(1B2) The student will understand (i) the role of electric fields in the transport of charge in semiconductors at room temperature, conditions under whch thermal energies of carriers dominates the net force-velocity relationships and causes the velocity, rather than acceleration, to be proportional to force (electric field), (ii) the dependence of the resistivity of a semiconductor on the carrier mobility and carrier density, (ii) the role of electric fields at PN junctions and the contribution of depletion regions (of ionic charge) in controlling current flow through such junctions, (iv) the role of electric fields developed across the metal-insulator-semiconductor region of an MOS transistor in controlling the net free carrier charge density at the insulator/semiconductor interface.
(1B3) The student will understand the concept of a non-zero bandgap in semiconductors, the relationship of Fermi energy on the steady state density of thermally excited carriers, and the principle of effective mass arising from the energy/momentum relations.
(1C1) The student will understand (i) the concept of effective mass of electrons and holes in semiconductors based on the energy-momentum relationship of carriers in semiconductor crystals and the role of that effective mass in establishng the transport equations for such carriers and (ii) the role of phonons in satisfying the energy and momentum conservation laws during recombination of carriers.
(1C3) The student will understand the basic principles underlying fabrication of semiconductor devices (including patterning, oxidation, thin-film deposition, creation of regions doped with acceptors and/or donors, and annealing) and the dependence of the behavior of devices on the fabricated structure of the devices.
(1C4) The student will understand the development of device models (diode, bipolar transistor, MOS transistor, LED, semiconductor laser) from the underlying physical laws governing carriers and photon generation & recombination in semiconductors.
(2A1) The student will be familiar with basic measurable characteristics (capacitance, current-voltage, conductance, etc) of semiconductor devices and their analytical relationship to the physical properties of the semiconductor devices.
(2A2) The student will be able to understand the relationships between the electrical behavior of a device and the underlying physical laws relating device structure/properties to electrical behavior.


Prepared S. Tewksbury Date: April 2, 2003

CpE 487 Digital System Design (Required)
Electrical and Computer Engineering Department
1. Catalog Description: Design of complex digital CMOS VLSI circuits. Introduction to MOS transistor characteristics and fabrication, digital circuit design & layout for integrated circuits, major categories of VLSI circuit functions, design methodologies including use of Hardware Description Languages (HDLs), FPGAs, verification, simulation, testability. The course will include a project using VHDL for the design of a significant system function. (3-0-3)
2. Prerequisites: CpE 358
3. Textbook: J. Bhasker, VHDL Primer, 3rd edition, 1999. Prentice Hall. ISDN 0-13-096575-8.
4. Topics Covered
Overview of silicon CMOS technology and design of digital logic in CMOS
Programming language aspects of VHDL: concurrent and sequential circuit models.
Xilinx VHDL design software tools.
Structural and dataflow modeling of combinational and sequential circuits and digital systems.
Behavioral modeling of digital circuits/systems
Structured (hierarchical) design of highly complex digital systems within VHDL.
Verification of VHDL designs using structural/dataflow models in combination with behavioral models
Programmable logic families (PLAs, FPGAs, etc.)
Synthesis of VHDL design in physical FPGA
Project: This course requires completion of a significant digital system design suitable for FPGA implementation. Students successfully completing the verification stage of their designs proceed to and complete the synthesis of their designs on a Xilinx FPGA-based evaluation system.
5. Class Schedule: Three 1 hr lectures/week.
6. Contribution to meeting professional component
Contributes to the “Engineering Science” part of “Engineering Topics”. See Course Objectives in Item 7 below.
7. Assessment Performance Criteria (APCs)
(1A4) The student will be able to develop complex digital circuits and system functions based on general algorithms, ignoring details of their implementation, within hierarchical design frameworkds within which the design process itself is an algorithmic process including specifications, testing and verification and proceeds through a design flow chart structure.
(1A5) The student will be able to represent complex digital circuits in the form of the hierarchically organized VHDL design/simulation software tools, including the various data representations used to represent binary signal path(s) and to represent the design of a complex circuit in terms of design flow charts, including use of structural models within the VHDL environment.
(3B1) The student will be able to represent circuit designs, simulations, and realizations within the documentation software tools provided by an HDL such as VHDL.
(3B3) The student will be able to use digital simulation software verifying functional and timing correctness of a VHDL/Verilog specified digital circuit/system.
(4A2) The student will be able to apply entity/architecture modeling approaches in VHDL for representation of component inputs and outputs as well as internal signals, variables and states of components.
(5B1) The student will be able to develop VHDL architectural representations of systems and components using models representing structure, behavior, or data flow concepts describing the internal structure or external behavior of the circuit.
(5D1) The student will be able to develop final technical documentation of a complex digital system using VHDL language descriptions, schematic descriptions labeling all component inputs and outputs, and performance based on simulations of the system.
(5E1) The student will be able to decompose a complex digital system design problem into various sets of interconnected components and evaluate the relative merits of alternative designs.

Prepared by : S. Tewksbury Date : April 12, 2003


CpE 490 Information Systems Engineering I (Required)
Electrical and Computer Engineering Department
1. Catalog Description: The focus of the course is on data networks and end-user software environments for information systems. Topics include the TCP/IP protocols, organization of large-scale data networks, end-to-end operation over heterogeneous networks, and the software foundation of client-server application programs. The students will complete a project using TCP/IP protocols to create a basic client-server application. (3-0-3)
2. Prerequisites: Basic knowledge of a high-level programming language (C++, etc.).
3. Textbook: Douglas E. Comer, Internetworking with TCP/IP: Principles, Protocols and Architectures, Forth Edition, Prentice Hall 2000, ISBN 0-13-018380-6.
4. Topics Covered
Protocol Layering
LAN and WAN technologies (Chap. 2)
Internetworking Concept and Architectural Model (Chap. 3)
Internet Address (Chap. 4)
Mapping Internet Addresses to Physical Addresses – ARP (Chap. 5)
Determining An Internet Address At Startup – RARP (Chap. 6)
Bootstrap and autoconfiguration (Chap. 23)
Internet Protocol
Connectionless Datagram Delivery (Chap. 7)
Routing IP Datagrams (Chap. 8)
Error and control messages (Chap. 9)
Subnet address extensions (Chap. 10)
Socket Programming
Client-Server Model of Interaction (Chap. 21)
The Socket Interface (Chap. 22)
User Datagram Protocol – UDP (Chap. 12)
Reliable Stream Transport Services – TCP (Chap. 13)
The Domain Name System (DNS) (Chap. 24)
Remote Login (Telnet, Rlogin) (Chap. 25)
File Transfer and Access (FTP) (Chap. 26)
Electronic Mail (SMTP, POP, IMAP, MIME) (Chap. 27)
World Wide Web (HTTP) (Chap. 28)
5. Class Schedule: One 3 hr lecture/week.
6. Contribution to meeting professional component
Contributes to the “Engineering Science” part of “Engineering Topics”. See Course Objectives in Item 7 below.
7. Assessment Performance Criteria (APCs)
(1A4) The student will be able to (i) understand the organization of network-interfacing software in terms of the sequence of actions initiated via network communication events and (ii) understand the transition between application data streams and physical network data streams using OSI-based protocol models for TCP/IP networks.
(1A5) The student will be able to understand and implement data structures of various protocol data formats and understand the contents of data fields that support certain algorithms (e.g., routing algorithms, congestion control algorithms).
(3B1) The student will be able to develop Web sites describing their designs of TCP/IP application software in team-based projects related to class projects.
(3B3) The student will be able to develop basic programs exercising the operating system TCP/IP software interfaces to the network and verify the performance of the programs using loop-back to simulate connections to a remote compute and (ii) develop portable TCP and UDP software procedures for general client-side and client-side software.
(3B4) The student will be able to obtain standard protocol documents, protocol reviews, R&D literature, and reference software from web-resources
(4A3) The student will be able to specify and use the TCP/IP protocol stack software objects to specify the remote computer's Internet address, the remote computer's port, and service function desired, and other TCP/IP parameters through which a client connects to a remote server.
(4A4) The student will be able to (i) design and represent data networks using graphical representations of the network hardware used to implement a local or wider area network, (ii) represent the movement of data packets through a heterogeneous network using the protocol stack model, and (iii) represent the overall data file being transmitted over a TCP data connection as sets of segmented data.
(4B1) The student will be able to (i) select either a TCP or UDP connection based on the characteristics of the client-server application and the data transferred between the client and server and design server-side software appropriate for single user or multiple user simultaneous access.
(4B2) The student will be able to implement a suitable program response to a TCP/IP interface function call that indicates an error and to understand the addition of security through encryption of the data transferred to the network.
(5B1) The student will be able to develop a client-server application for at least one operating system (Windows, BCD Unix, Linux, etc.). and to develop a nontrivial client-server application using at least one major programming language (C, C++, JAVA, Visual Basic, etc.).
(5D1) The student will be able to provide a technical description of his/her client-server application program project, including technical block diagrams illustrating the main functions of the program, flowcharts illustrating the general operation of the software, and discussions providing an overview of the application along with the software structures used.
Prepared by : H. Man Date : Mar. 10, 2003


EE 348 System Theory (Not Required)
Electrical and Computer Engineering Department
1. Catalog Description: An introduction to the mathematical methods used in the study of communications systems with practical applications. Fourier transforms, discrete and fast. Functions of a complex variable. Laplace and Z transforms. (3,0,3)
2. Prerequisites: E 245, Ma 227.
3. Textbook: A.V. Oppenheim, A.S. Willsky, & S.H. Nawab, Signals and Systems, Second Edition, Prentice Hall, 1997
4. Topics Covered
Introduction to continuous and discrete-time signals and systems: Transformations of independent variable, periodic signals, even and odd signals, continuous and discrete-time complex exponential & sinusoidal signals, periodicity properties of discrete-time complex exponentials, unit ipulse and unit step function, basic system properties (memory, invertibility, causality, stability, time invariance, linearity)
Linear Time-Invariant Systems (LTI Systems): Discrete-Time LTI systems, discrete-time signal representation in terms of impulses, system impulse response, convolution sum, continuous-time LTI systems, continuous-time signal representation in terms of impulses, system impulse response, convolution integral, causality and stability, unit step response, systems defined by differential and difference equations
Fourier Series: Response of LTI systems to complex exponentials, Fourier series representations of continuous-time periodic signals, convergence, properties, Parseval’s relation, Fourier series representations of discrete-time periodic signals, properties, Parseval’s relation, Fourier series and LTI systems, discrete and continuous-time filtering.
Continuous-Time Fourier Transform: Aperiodic signal representation, convergence, transform for periodic signals, properties, Parseval’s relation, convolution, duality, systems characterized by linear constant-coefficient differential equations
Discrete-Time Fourier Transform: Aperiodic signal representation, convergence, transform for periodic signals, properties, Parseval’s relation, convolution, duality, systems characterized by linear constant-coefficient difference equations
Time and Frequency Characterization of Signals and Systems: Magnitude-phase representation of Fourier transform, magnitude-phase frequency response of LTI systems, time and frequency-domain properties of filters
Introduction to Communication Systems: Sinusoidal amplitude modulation and demodulation, Frequency division multiplexing, demultiplexing and demodulation.
The LaplaceTransform: Poles, zeros, convergence, inverse transform, properties, initial and final value theorems, LTI systems characterization and analysis, causality, stability
The Z –Transform: Convergence, inverse transform, properties, initial and final value theorems, LTI systems characterization and analysis, causality, stability
Introduction to Linear Feedback Systems: Continuous and discrete-time LTI feedback system models, open loop and closed loop poles, stability

5. Class Schedule: Two 1.5 hour lectures/week.
6. Contribution to meeting professional component
Contributes to the Scientific and Engineering Foundations goals as established for the EE program. “The graduate will be proficient in the use of mathematical principles underlying…systems and in mathematical representations for analysis and manipulation of signals”(SEAC Goals 1 and 4), corresponding to ABET program outcome (a), “an ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science and engineering”.
7. Assessment Performance Criteria (APCs)
The student will be able to
(1A1) Determine the effect of time scaling, reversal or delay operations on the signal waveform, to analyze circuits described by linear, constant coefficient differential equations, to relate the frequency response to resistance, capacitance and inductance values and to determine the effect of sampling rates and modulating frequency on the spectrum of a continuous-time signal.
(1A2) Decompose a discrete-time or continuous-time signal in terms of impulses and to evaluate the impulse response of a system described by linear, constant coefficient difference or differential equations; evaluate a system’s response to a given input by the convolution summation or convolution integral; understand the derivation of mathematical conditions for stability and causality of an LTI system.
(1A3) Understand the relevance of the signal multiplication property of Fourier Transforms to amplitude modulation and demodulation as well as to frequency division multiplexing; understand the relevance of the Sampling Theorem and the Nyquist rate to signal sampling and reconstruction; understand the use of Laplace and Z transforms and their singularities to determine stability of an LTI system and will be able to use an LTI system’s poles and zeros to determine its causality and stability; understand the use of feedback to stabilize an unstable system and be able to relate the mathematical properties of the impulse response of a discrete-time or continuous-time LTI system to system stability and causality (physical realizability).
(1C5) Represent discrete-time and continuous-time signals in terms of there frequency content using Discrete-Time and Continuous-Time Fourier Transforms; determine the frequency response of LTI systems described by linear, constant coefficient difference or differential equations; determine the frequency response of an LTI system from its impulse response; determine the frequency content of the output of an LTI system, given the time domain or frequency domain representation of the input and system;
(1C5) Determine the effect of modulating a signal on the signal’s frequency spectrum and determine how to recover the original signal; understand the use of modulators and filters in frequency division multiplexing; determine the effect of sampling a signal on the signal’s frequency spectrum and determine how to recover the original signal; determine the Nyquist rate for a band-limited signal and understand the aliasing effect of under-sampling; represent a system’s frequency response in terms of its magnitude and phase response.
(4B1) Determine the bandwidth of ideal filters necessary to extract a desired signal from its sampled or modulated form and to determine the frequency characteristics of an LTI system necessary to obtain a desired output from a given input.
(4C1) Use partial fractions expansions to decompose a rational system function and decompose a complex system function into simpler ones each corresponding to a unit of the system; combine individual units in series, parallel or by feedback to achieve the overall system properties and to determine if a designed LTI system with feedback is stable.

Prepared by: H. Heffes Date: March 17, 2003
EE 359 Electronic Circuits (Not Required)
Electrical and Computer Engineering Department
1. Catalog Description: Design of differential amplifiers using BJTs or FETs; design of output stages (Class A, B, class AB); analysis of output and input impedance of differential amplifiers; frequency response. Feedback amplifiers; Nyquist criteria, Nyquist plots and root loci; bode plots, gain/phase margins and amplifiers; oscillators, tuned amplifiers, and filters (passive and active). A suitable circuit analysis package will be used for solving many of the problems. (3-0-3)
2. Prerequisites: E 246
3. Textbook: A.S. Sedra and K. C. Smith, Microelectronic Circuits, 4th Edition, Oxford University Press, 1998.
4. Topics Covered
Definition of amplifiers and filters with Opamp as an idealized amplifier model.
Modeling of semiconductors for amplification.
Diodes and Diode circuits
Bipolar Junction Transistor (BJT) : device construction, equivalent circuits for large and small signal analysis, graphical analysis, biasing, switch and single stage amplifier application, regions of operation, characteristic for common base, common emitter and emitter follower configurations.
Field Effect Transistors (FET): metal oxide semiconductor (MOS) device, operation in triode, enhancement and depletion saturation regions, large and small signal analysis, n-type, p-type and complementary MOS (NMOS,PMOS, CMOS) device, CMOS large and small signal model, active load using FET, switch application.
Differential and Multistage Amplifiers : large and small signal model, biasing, current mirrors, multistage amplifiers, opamp model as a multistage amplifier, cascode amplifier, MOSFET equivalents to BJT amplifiers
Frequency Response: s-domain analysis, Bode amplitude and phase plots, amplifier transfer functions for low and high frequencies for common source, emitter and emitter follower amplifier circuits.
Feedback: physical systems, negative feedback, sampling and mixing, loop gain, stability, gain and phase margins.
Filters and Tuned Amplifiers: First and second order filters, all pass and notch filtrs, opamp resonator, transformations.

5. Class Schedule: Two 1.5 hour lectures/week.
6. Contribution to meeting professional component
Contributes to the “Engineering Science” part of “Engineering Topics”. See Course Objectives in Item 7 below.
7. Assessment Performance Criteria (APCs)
The student will be able to
Analyze circuits with resistors, capacitors and dependent sources using differential equations and Laplace transforms. (Program Outcome 1)
Understand the derivation of models to calculate large signal properties and small signal operation of the amplifier such as input/output resistance and gain. (Program Outcome 1)
Relate ideal circuit elements, like current sources, to their real-circuit counterparts. Relate capacitance in devices to the frequency performance of circuits and the use of multiple stages to avoid frequency limitations. (Program Outcome 1)
Relate an amplifier to a transfer function in frequency domain. Determine frequency spectrum of different transmit filtering and modulation schemes. Relate feedback to frequency performance and stability using Bode plots. (Program Outcome 1)
Utilize PSpice to simulate electronic circuits with the object of evaluating their performance under various conditions of input, circuit element selections, frequency, and system requirements. (Program Outcome 3)
Identify, and analytically evaluate the various relationships among voltage, current and power in electronic circuitry and use appropriate units of variables suitable to the application under consideration. (Program Outcome 4)
Calculate the relationships that exist between various points of electronic circuitry use the functional relationships under consideration to evaluate sensitivity and responsiveness of output variables to input and circuit parameters. (Program Outcome 4)
Utilize block diagrams, schematics, and plots of input-output relationships to represent physical circuits will be able to represent complex circuit elements and subsystems by simplified and accurate equivalent circuit input-output relationships (Program Outcome 4)
Specify standard circuit elements needed to implement a given input output requirement and to specify the characteristics of sub-systems, such as amplifiers and oscillators, needed to support desired input output requirements. (Program Outcome 4)
The student will be able to identify how electronic structures are interconnected electrically and to utilize feedback theory and its applications to identify feedback structures. (Program Outcome 4)
Utilize design equations, standard circuit components and known manufactured electronic devices having given input output performance characteristics to synthesize a circuit whose performance will approximate to a specified degree of accuracy the required input output requirement. (Program Outcome 5)

Prepared by: U. Tureli Date: April 10, 2003
EE 440 Contemporary Topics in EE (Not Required)
Electrical and Computer Engineering Department
1. Catalog Description:
This course will consist of lectures designed to explore a topic of contemporary interest from the perspective of current research and development. In addition to lectures by the instructors and discussions led by students, the course will include talks by professional working in the topic being studied. When appropriate, team-based design projects will be included. Cross-listed with EE 440. (3-0-3)
2. Prerequisites: (None)
3. Textbook: (None) Reading materials will be provided by the instructor.
4. Topics Covered (Spring 03)
Overview of Wireless Communications
Overview of Wireless Networking
Overview of Spread Spectrum and CDMA
3G and Future Generation Wireless Networks
DSP for Wireless Communications
Wireless Multimedia Applications
Security and Privacy in Wireless Networks
Microelectronics for Wireless Systems
Wireless Test Bed Development
Spectrum Management: FCC
5. Class Schedule: Typically 1 hour lectures/week with course instructor. Invited speakers or required attendance at topical seminars complement the lectures by the instructor.
6. Contribution to meeting professional component
Contributes to the “Engineering Topics”. See Course Objectives in Item 9 below.
7. Assessment Performance Criteria (APCs)
When exploring contemporary applications of science and engineering principles, the student will be able to understand their relevance of the mathematical principles to the application. (Program Outcome a)
When exploring contemporary themes, the student will be able to understand and articulate algorithmic thinking through flow charts and related techniques. (Program Outcome c)
The student will be able to understand the role of data representation and structured flow views representing algorithms related to contemporary applications. (Program Outcome b)
When exploring a technical topic, the student will be able to identify and apply relevant principles of engineering science, both inside and outside their major. (Program Outcome d)
The student will be able to effectively use computer-based and information technology-based tools, and software for preparing, transmitting, and displaying multimedia documents, including technical drawings/presentations. (Program Outcome k)
The student will be able to effectively use computer-based and information technology-based tools for searching and making use of Web-based resources. (Program Outcome k)
The student will be able to understand hierarchically described systems based on component properties and the input/output states of components. (Program Outcome c)
The student will able to cogently develop ideas for presentation by clearly outlining the crucial concepts and ideas. (Program Outcome g)
The student will be able to develop and practice strategies for keeping abreast of scientific or technical concepts needed for successful professional performance and pursue relevant continuing education programs. (Program Outcome i)
The student will be able to follow current professional literature in various media. (Program Outcome j)

Prepared by Yu-Dong Yao Date: March 12, 2003

EE 448 Digital Signal Processing (Not Required)
Electrical and Computer Engineering Department
1. Catalog Description: Introduction to the theory and design of digital signal processing systems. Includes review of analog signal processing, sampling techniques, analog/digital and digital/analog conversion, mathematical modeling, characterization of discrete time systems, implementation of discrete time, Fourier transform, digital filter simulation, and digital signal processors. (3,0,3)
2. Prerequisites: EE 348
3. Textbook:
Required
Sanjit. K. Mitra, Digital Signal Processing: A Computer Based Approach, 2e, McGraw Hill, 2001.
Matlab codes used in this text:  HYPERLINK "http://www.mhhe.com/engcs/electrical/mitra/" http://www.mhhe.com/engcs/electrical/mitra/)
Recommended:
Oppenheim, Schafer, and Buck, Discrete-Time Signal Processing, Prentice Hall, 1999.
Ingle and Proakis, Digital Signal Processing using MATLAB, Brooks/Cole Publishing, 1999.
Oppenheim, Willsky with Nawab, Signals and Systems, 2e, Prentice Hall, 1997.

4. Topics Covered
Time-domain characterizations: basic operations and classifications of discrete-time (DT) signals; basic sequences; sampling; DT systems properties including linearity, shift-invariance, causality, and stability; impulse response, linear convolution, and difference equations.
Transform-domain characterizations: DTFT, DFT, Z-transform and properties; circular convolution; linear convolution by DFT/FFT; pole-zero locations versus causality and stability; and partial-fraction expansion;
Transform-domain analysis of LTI systems: frequency response, magnitude, phase and group delays; transfer functions; ideal filters; linear-phase FIR filters; simple standard FIR and IIR filters; comb filters; all-pass filters; minimum-phase and maximum phase; inverse systems.
Digital Processing of continuous-time signals: effect of sampling in the frequency domain, reconstruction, and sampling of bandpass signals.

5. Class Schedule: Evening. One 3 hour lectures/week
6. Contribution to meeting professional component
Contributes to the “Engineering Science” part of “Engineering Topics”. See Course Objectives in Item 7 below.
7. Assessment Performance Criteria (APCs)
(1A2) Students will be able to
Understand basic discrete-time signals, sequence operations and classifications.
Understand fundamental properties of discrete-time systems, including linearity, shift-invariance, causality and stability.
(1A3) Students will be able to understand the Sampling Theory and use it to determine the minimum sampling rate of bandlimited signals.
(1C5) Students will be able to
Use frequency-domain analysis tools, including DTFT, DTF and Z-transform to analyze discrete-time LTI systems.
Determine the frequency response, magnitude, and group delay of discrete-time LTI systems.
Understand the concept of filtering and apply standard digital filters.
(3B2) Students will be able to use computational tools for finding graphical, numerical and analytical solutions to DSP problems.
(3B3) Students will be able to use state-of-the-art DSP simulation software (e.g., Matlab) to simulate and analyze discrete-time signals and systems in both the time- and frequency domain.
(3B4) Students will be encouraged to apply web search tools to search for course-related materials on the Internet.
(4A3) Students will be able to use impulse response, linear convolution, frequency response and transfer function to determine the input-output relation of a discrete-time system and to predict mutual changes.

Prepared Hongbin Li Date: April 9, 2003

EE 465 Introduction to Communication Systems (Not Required)
Electrical and Computer Engineering Department
1. Catalog Description: Review of probability, random processes, signals and systems. Topics include building blocks of communication systems, analog signal transmission and reception covering various carrier modulation schemes, effect of noise, and comparative performance analysis, digital transmission through an AWGN channel, optimum receivers and error probabilities, inter-symbol-interference and Nyquist criteria, digital carrier modulation schemes: ASK, FSK, PSK, QPSK, and MSK, and their bit-error probabilities, entropy, channel capacity and source coding, error control coding and linear block codes. (3,0,3)
2. Prerequisites: EE 348
3. Textbook: Simon Haykin, Communication Systems, John Wiley and Sons, 2000.
4. Topics Covered
Random processes: mathematical definition of a random process; stationary random processes; mean, correlation, and covariance; ergodic processes; transmission of a random processes trough a linear time-invariant filter; power spectral density; Gaussian process; narrowband processes.
Continuous-wave modulation: AM and linear modulation; frequency translation; frequency modulation; superheterodyn receiver; noise analysis in CW modulation systems.
Pulse modulation: sampling process; PAM and other forms of pulse modulation; quantization; PCM; time-division multiplexing; delta modulation; linear prediction; DPCM.
Baseband pulse transmission: matched filter; error rate due to noise.
Passband digital transmission: OOK, BPSK, BFSK.

5. Class Schedule: One 3 hour lectures/week
6. Contribution to meeting professional component
Contributes to the “Engineering Science” part of “Engineering Topics”. See Course Objectives in Item 7 below.
7. Assessment Performance Criteria (APCs)
(1A1) The student will be able to recognize mathematical parameters, such as frequency, statistical mean, correlation and power spectral density, to physical variables in communication systems, and vice-versa.)
(1A2) The student will be able to understand the following general mathematical concepts related to continuous-wave (CW) and pulse modulation: AM (amplitude modulation), DSB-SC (double sideband-suppressed carrier), SSB (single sideband), and VSB (vestigial sideband) modulation; FDM (frequency division multiplexing); FM (frequency modulation), and PM (phase modulation); PAM (pulse amplitude modulation), PCM (pulse code modulation), and TDM (time division multiplexing); DM (delta modulation), DPCM (differential pulse code modulation), and matched filter.
(1A3) The student will be able to (i) understand how to decompose a bandpass random process into in-phase and quadrature baseband components, and use such decomposition to represent message and noise signals in communication systems and (ii) understand the relevance of the Sampling Theorem and the Nyquist rate to signal sampling and reconstruction.
(1C5) The student will be able to use Fourier transform to perform frequency-domain analysis of standard communication systems.
(3B2) The student will be able to determine the magnitude and phase responses of a communication system, simulate the process of typical CW and pulse modulation/demodulation schemes, and generate graphical and numerical results by using computational tools, e.g., Matlab.
(3B3) The student will be able to use effectively state-of-the-art communication system simulation packages, e.g., Matlab.
(4A3) The student will be able to (i) use the transfer function (i.e., impulse response or frequency response) of a communication system to relate its output to the input and (ii) determine the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) at the input and output of a communication system, and use it as a figure of merit to assess the noise performance of the communication system.


Prepared Hongbin Li Date: March 23, 2003

CpE 440 Current Topics in Electrical and Computer Engineering s (Not Required)
Electrical and Computer Engineering Department
1. Catalog Description: Introduction to Image Processing and Coding Image acquisition, storage, image formation, sampling, basic relationship between pixels, imaging geometry, segmentation: edge detection, edge linking and boundary detection, Hough transform, region growing, thresholding, split and merge, histogram matching, representation: chain code, polygonal approximation and skeletonization, thinning algorithms, texture, image compression: elementary discussion of motion vectors for compression, discussion of industry standards such as JEPG and MPEG. (3-0-3)
2. Prerequisites: EE348
3. Textbook: Rafael C. Gonzalez, Richard E. Woods (Eds), Digital Image Processing, 2nd edition, Prentice Hall 2002; ISBN: 0201180758
4. Topics Covered
Introduction to Signal and Image Processing
Digital Signal Processing Fundamentals: Signals and systems; signal representation and Fourier transform; sampling theory; FIR and IIR filtering
Two-Dimensional DSP: 2-D signals and systems; 2-D filters and filtering; 2-D Discrete Fourier Transform; 2-D Discrete Cosine Transform
Image Perception and Representation: Human visual system; light, brightness, contrast; color modeling and representation
Image Enhancement: Arithmetic operations; Intensity transforms; histogram and histogram equalization; smoothing and sharpening through 2-D filtering
Image Analysis: Point, line and edge detection; segmentation and thresholding
Geometric Processing: Interpolation and down-scaling; rotation
Digital Halftoning: Patterning; dithering; error Diffusion
Image Coding: Quantization; entropy coding; compression standards
Term Project: This course includes a significant student project.
5. Class Schedule: One 3 hr lecture/week.
6. Contribution to meeting professional component
Contributes to the “Engineering Science” part of “Engineering Topics”. See Course Objectives in Item 7 below.
7. Assessment Performance Criteria (APCs)
(1A2) The students will be able to follow the general mathematical concepts of a derivation of an engineering or scientific result and will possess the mathematical skills to link those concepts.
(1A3) The students will be able to understand the relevance of the mathematical results to physical applications.
(1A4) The students will be able to articulate algorithmic thinking through flow charts.

(1C5) Both inside and outside their major, students will be able to analyze dynamical systems in the frequency domain.
(3B2) Students will be able to use computer-based and information technology-based tools. Students will have the ability to effectively use computational tools for finding graphical, numerical, statistical, and analytical solutions to problems;
(3B3) Students will have the ability to systems simulations appropriate to engineering practice.
(4A3) Students will be able to identify technical relationships between the input, output and variables and use the relationships to predict mutual changes.
(4B1) Students will be able to utilize design equations to specify units or components. Given appropriate input and desired outputs, the students will be able to specify the characteristics of the component or unit required for its construction or acquisition.
(5E1) Students will be able to adopt imaginative and innovative approaches to the design process. The students will be able apply creative and critical thinking skills.
(5E3) Students will be able to implement diverse problem solving strategies.

Prepared by : H. Man Date : March 10, 2003


CpE 485-486 Research in Computer Engineering I-II s (Not Required)
Electrical and Computer Engineering Department
1. Catalog Description: Individual investigation of a substantive character taken at the undergraduate level under the guidance of a faculty advisor leading to a thesis with a public defense. The student's thesis committee will consist of the faculty advisor and one or more readers. Prior approval from the faculty advisor and the Department Director is required. Hours to be arranged with the faculty advisor. For information regarding a Degree with Thesis, see the section "Academic Procedures, Requirements, and Advanced Degrees" section of this catalog. (0-8-3) (0-8-3)
2. Prerequisites: Permission of faculty advisor
3. Textbook: (None)
4. Topics Covered
CpE 485/486 is a two-semester sequence leading to a B.E. in Electrical Engineering with Thesis. Students arrange for a faculty member to serve as a "thesis" advisor. During CpE 485, the student completes the necessary background studies to fully define the topic of his/her individual investigation. During CpE 485, the student works closely with the faculty advisor in defining the topic and in obtaining advice and direction related to an acceptable topic. During CpE 486 (and perhaps starting during CpE 485), the student conducts his/her investigation, leading to a significant report of the student's results to his/her advisor at the end of CpE 486. Students interested in completing CpE 486, the second phase of the thesis studies, must demonstrate performance in CpE 485 acceptable to the faculty advisor and admission into CpE 486 assumes that work started in CpE 485 will be completed in CpE 486. Since the topics of the students' investigations vary widely, each student is treated as an individual case.
5. Class Schedule: Meetings with advisor as specified by the advisor.
6. Contribution to meeting professional component
Contributes to the “Engineering Science” part of “Engineering Topics”. See Course Objectives in Item 7 below.
7. Assessment Performance Criteria (APCs)
(1A1) The student will be able to understand the general topic of his/her research from the perspectives of the principles of mathematics and software/data structures applicable.
(1A2) The student will be able to understand the quantitative aspects of his/her research topic through the mathematical analysis and software/data structural representations that are applicable.
(1A3) The student will be able to apply mathematical analysis and software/data system design to the completion of specific topics within the area of his/her project, as appropriate to the project.
(1A4) The student will be able to present the results of his/her investigations quantitatively using the principles of mathematics and software/data system design.
(1A5) The student will be able to understand and present the results of his/her investigations from the perspective of algorithmic thinking and algorithm representations.
(1C1) The student will be able to apply relevant principles of science and engineering to the completion of his/her project, including use of time and frequency domains as appropriate to the project.
(2A1) The student will be able to define tests and measurements as appropriate for verification of his/her project's outcomes/performance.
(2B1) The student will be able to define alternative approaches for verification/demonstration of his/her project, including simulations and real operation of any components, as appropriate to the project.
(3B2) The student will be able to effectively use computational tools and information-technology-based tools for finding quantitative solutions to problems as appropriate to the project.
(3B4) The student will able to effectively use computer-based and information technology-based tools for searching and making use of Web-based resources.
(9A1) The student will be able to cogently develop ideas for presentation by determining the purpose of the communication.
(9A3) The student will be able to cogently develop ideas for presentation by clearly outlining the crucial concepts and ideas.

Prepared by : S. Tewksb ury Date : March 14, 2003


CpE 491 Information Systems Engineering II (Not Required)
Electrical and Computer Engineering Department
1. Catalog Description: This course emphasizes a major component of contemporary networked information systems, namely visually rich information, including multimedia, virtual reality, human-machine interactions, and related topics. The students will complete a project in which they will demonstrate competency in creating and manipulating the information and the resources used to store, transfer, and present the information. (3-0-3)
2. Prerequisites: (None)
3. Textbook: Class notes
4. Topics Covered
Layered network architectures
Data communications
Wide area networks
Image and video compression
Digital image and video watermarking
Encryption techniques
5. Class Schedule: One 3 hr lecture/week.
6. Contribution to meeting professional component
Contributes to the “Engineering Science” part of “Engineering Topics”. See Course Objectives in Item 7 below.
7. Assessment Performance Criteria (APCs)
Represent data flow through OSI layers (Program outcome 1)
Describe data structures for digital watermarking (Program outcome 1)
Design and optimize image and video codecs (Program outcome 4)
Design network with routers and switches (Program outcome 4)
Select TCP or UDP protocols depending on the application. (Program outcome 4)
Perform cost benefit analysis of secure computer network design. (Program outcome 5)

Prepared by : R. Chandramouli Date : May 9, 2003


CpE 493: Data and Computer Communications s (Not Required)
Electrical and Computer Engineering Department
1. Catalog Description: Introduction to information networks, data transmission and encoding; digital communication techniques, circuit switching and packet switching; OSI protocols; switched networks and LANs; introduction to ISDN and ATM/SONET; networks, systems architectures. (3,0,3).
2. Prerequisites: (None). Note: E243 was listed earlier in catalog. Has been removed.
3. Textbook: Leon-Garcia and Indra Widjaja, Communication Networks, Fundamental concepts and key architectures, Mc-Graw Hill, ISBN 0-07-242349-8, 2001
4. Topics Covered
Applications and layered architectures : Examples of layering, OSI model, overview
of TCP/IP.
Digital transmission fundamentals: digitization, data compression, shannon capacity, error detection codes.
Peer to peer protocols: Service models, ARQ protocols, flow control.
LAN and MAC: LAN structure, random access techniques, channelization.
Packet switching: Routing algorithms in packet networks, shortest path algorithms, traffic management and QoS.
TCP/IP: Architecture, IP protocols, TCP protocols.
5. Class Schedule: One 3 hr lecture/week.
6. Contribution to meeting professional component
Contributes to the “Engineering Science” part of “Engineering Topics”. See Course Objectives in Item 7 below.
7. Assessment Performance Criteria (APCs)
(1A4) The students will be able to:
Represent the data flow through various layers of the OSI network protocol stack.
Represent and understand the steps involved in network feedback error control techniques.
Represent and understand the TCP/IP protocol suite.
Represent and understand data flow from one router to another.
(1A5) The students will be able to:
Describe the different data structures (headers, data fields, and trailers) used in the conversion of a user data file into TCP or UDP packets used for transmission over a physical network.
Describe the three popular retransmission techniques and corresponding packet structure.
(3B1) The students will be able to develop power point slides and web sites to describe their approach for TCP/UDP application development in class projects.
(3B3 ) The students will be able to:
Develop basic programs to simulate, test and verify the performance of networking protocols.
Develop programs for statistical analysis of measured parameters for meaningful inference.
Develop programs to introduce errors in network data transfers.
(3B4) The students will be able to:
Acquire programs for statistical analysis of simulated data for class projects.
Acquire example computer networking software to supplement student-developed software.
Obtain current information on recent technologies such as IPSec.
Obtain current information related to data network hardware (routers, switches, etc) from suppliers (Cisco and other suppliers) and the use of such hardware in the implementation of contemporary data networks.
(4A3) The students will be able to:
Specify and use the TCP protocol mechanism in accordance with network congestion state.
Invoke appropriate retransmission schemes based on the delay constraints.
Understand and use TCP or UDP protocols for various applications with resource constraints.
(4A4) The students will be able to:
Design and represent data networks using graphical representations of the network hardware used to implement a local or wider area network.
Represent the movement of data packets through a heterogeneous network using the protocol stack model to represent the actions performed on the data packets.
Represent the overall data file being transmitted over a TCP data connection as sets of segmented data at various levels of the protocol stack.
(4B1) The students will be able to:
Select either a TCP or UDP connection based on the characteristics of the application and the data transferred between the client and server.
Design routing mechanisms appropriate for network access.
(4B2) The students will be able to:
Devise suitable protocols for services requiring a specific QoS.
Understand the trade-off involved securenetworking.
(5D1) The students will be able to: provide a technical description of his/her application and networking requirement including technical block diagrams illustrating the main functions of the networked application, flowcharts illustrating the general operation, and discussions providing an overview of the application along with the software structures necessary.
(5E1) The students will be able to:
Perform cost analysis of network design using different cost models.
Identify weakness and strengths of current networking technologies.

Prepared by : R. Chandramouli Date : April. 7, 2003
1-B.2 School of Engineering Core Curriculum Syllabi

PEP 101: Physics I for Engineering Students
1. Department, number, and title of course
Department of Physics and Engineering Physics
PEP 101 Physics I for Engineering Students

2. Designation as a ‘Required’ or ‘Elective’ course

Required

3. Course (Catalog) Description

An introductory course for students enrolled in the engineering curriculum. A weekly lecture with demonstrations and a weekly recitation. Bi-weekly exams evaluate the student’s progress in learning the central concepts of the course which include: Quantitative description of particle motion, vector manipulation and multiplication, Newton’s Laws of Motion, forces, friction, uniform circular motion, work and energy, momentum, conservation laws and rotational kinematics.

4. Prerequisite(s)

Corequisite: Ma 115.

5. Textbook(s) and/or other required material

D. Halliday, R. Resnick, and J. Walker, Physics, 6th Edition, Wiley.

6. Topics covered

Introduction to 1-D kinematics (displacement, velocity and acceleration)
Extension to 2-D and 3-D kinematics
Special kinematic cases: motion with constant velocity or constant acceleration
Concept of force, momentum, impulse, and energy
Newton’s laws and applications, free body diagrams, static equilibrium
Work energy theorem; kinetic and potential energy
Conservation of energy; systems of particles
Collisions
Rotational motion; angular momentum; torque

7. Class/laboratory schedule, i.e., number of sessions each week and duration of each session

2.5 credits; Lectures: 14@75 min. (1 per week); Recits: 14@50 min. (1 per week)

8. Contribution of course to meeting the professional component

Math and Science, 100%

9. Course objectives and relationship of course to program outcomes
The students will be able to:
Recognize how to use kinematic concepts in 1, 2, and 3 dimensions. (Program Outcome 1)
Relate kinematic motion to underlying forces and recognize forces as the cause of motion. (Program Outcome 1)
Comprehend the physical consequences of Newton’s laws and apply these laws to simple mechanical problems involving the concept of static equilibrium and free body diagrams. (Program Outcome 1)
Recognize the importance of energy in its various forms as a fundamental quantity which is governed by a conservation law under simplified conditions. (Program Outcome 1)
Relate momentum, impulse, and force to simple mechanical problems involving a single particle and a system of particles; comprehend the importance of momentum conservation (Program Outcome 1)
Apply the work-energy theorem to simple problems. (Program Outcome 1)
Extend lnear concepts to rotational motion; recognize the importance of angular momentum as a quantity governed by a conservation law. Program Outcome 1)

10. Person(s) who prepared this description and date of preparation

Prepared by : K. Becker Date : June 3, 2003
PEP 102: Physics II for Engineering Students
1. Department, number, and title of course

Department of Physics and Engineering Physics
PEP 102 Physics II for Engineering Students

2. Designation as a ‘Required’ or ‘Elective’ course

Required

3. Course (Catalog) Description

Charge, Coulomb’s law, electric field, Gauss’ law, electric potential, capacitance, electric current, resistance, DC circuits, magnetic field, Ampere’s law, Faraday’s law of induction, inductance, induced magnetic field and displacement current.

4. Prerequisite(s)

Prerequisite: Ma 115 and PEP 101.

5. Textbook(s) and/or other required material

D. Halliday, R. Resnick, and J. Walker, Physics, 6th Edition, Wiley.

6. Topics covered

Introduction to the concepts of electric charge and electric fields.
Gauss’ Law.
Electric Potential.
Concept of Capacitance and Capcaitors.
Current, Resistance, and Ohm’s Law.
Simple DC circuits.
Magnetic fields; Ampere’s law.
Induction; Faraday’s law
Inductance, induced magnetic field and displacement current.

7. Class/laboratory schedule, i.e., number of sessions each week and duration of each session

2.5 credits; Lects: 14@75 min. (1 per week); Recits: 14@50 min. (1 per week)

8. Contribution of course to meeting the professional component

Math and Science, 100%

9. Course objectives and relationship of course to program outcomes
The students will be able to:
Recognize the Coulomb force as the principal interaction between charged particles and use Gauss’ law to relate the flux of an electric field to the net charge. (Program Outcome 1)
Make the connection between electric field and electric potential and comprehend the conceptual similarity to the corresponding mechanical quantities (gravitation). (Program Outcome 1)
Use the concept of current and resistance in conjunction with Ohm’s law to analyze simple passive DC circuits. (Program Outcome 1)
Recognize magnetic fields as another fundamental quantity and comprehend the relation between magnetic fields and electric currents. (Program Outcome 1)
Recognize the relationship between electric and magnetic phenomena and comprehend the inherent interconnection between both. (Program Outcome 1)
Use the concept of induction and apply Faraday’s law. (Program Outcome 1)

10. Person(s) who prepared this description and date of preparation

Prepared by : K. Becker Date : June 3, 2003


PEP 201: Physics III for Engineering Students
1. Department, number, and title of course

Department of Physics and Engineering Physics
PEP 201 Physics III for Engineering Students

2. Designation as a ‘Required’ or ‘Elective’ course

Required

3. Course (Catalog) Description

Simple harmonic motion, oscillations and pendulums; Fourier analysis; wave properties; Doppler effect; properties of EM waves; polarization, reflection and refraction; geometric optics and thin lenses; imaging and optical instruments; diffraction and interference

4. Prerequisite(s)

PEP 101, PEP 102, Ma 115 and Ma 116 or equivalent.

5. Textbook(s) and/or other required material

D. Halliday, R. Resnick, and J. Walker, Physics, 6th Edition, Wiley.

6. Topics covered

Introduction to oscillations (periodic motion, harmonic motion, and simple harmonic motion)
Force and energy in simple harmonic motions ; mathematical and physical pendulum
Damped oscillations, forced oscillations and resonance
Introduction to mechanical waves; longitudinal and transverse waves; speed, wavelength, and frequency
Superposition of waves and interference; standing waves
The Doppler effect
Properties of electromagnetic waves
Polarization, reflection, and refraction
Thin lenses, optical instruments and imaging
Diffraction and interference
Lab: Concepts of oscillations and waves in mechanics, optics, and EM

7. Class/laboratory schedule, i.e., number of sessions each week and duration of each session

2.5 credits; Lects: 28@50 min. (2 per week); Lab: 7@180 min. (7 per term)

8. Contribution of course to meeting the professional component

Math and Science, 100%.

9. Course objectives and relationship of course to program outcomes
The students will be able to:
Recognize periodic, harmonic, and simple harmonic motion and their mathematical descriptions and make appropriate assumptions to simplify and categorize naturally occurring periodic phenomena in terms of these motions (Program Outcome 1)
Distinguish between undamped and damped oscillations using energy concepts; recognize driven/forced oscillations and appreciate the concept of resonance. (Program Outcome 1)
Extend the concept of oscillations to space- and time-dependent waves and recognize the conceptual similarity between mechanical, electrical, optical, and matter waves. (Program Outcome 1)
Effectively use software and other computer-based tools for imaging problems and analyzing simple optical instruments. (Program Outcome 3)
Apply classroom concepts in the analysis and interpretation of lab experiments; develop ability to design independent experiments (Program Outcome 2)

10. Person(s) who prepared this description and date of preparation

Prepared by : K. Becker Date : June 3, 2002
PEP 202: Physics IV for Engineering Students
1. Department, number, and title of course

Department of Physics and Engineering Physics
PEP 202 Physics IV for Engineering Students

2. Designation as a ‘Required’ or ‘Elective’ course

Required

3. Course (Catalog) Description

Wave-particle dualism; the Schrödinger equation and its interpretation; wave functions; the Heisenberg uncertainty principle; quantum mechanical tunneling and application; quantum mechanics of a particle in a “box,” the hydrogen atom; electronic spin; properties of many electron atoms; atomic spectra; principles of lasers and applications; electrons in solids; conductors and semi-conductors; the n-p junction and the transistor; properties of atomic nuclei; radioactivity; fusion and fission.

4. Prerequisite(s)

Prerequisite: Ma 221 and PEP 201 or equivalent.

5. Textbook(s) and/or other required material

D. Halliday, R. Resnick, and J. Walker, Physics, 6th Edition, Wiley.

6. Topics covered

The breakdown of classical physics (blackbody radiation, photoeffect, Compton effect, electron diffraction)
Planck’s hypothesis and photons
The de Broglie relation and the Heisenberg uncertainty principle
The Schrödinger equation and simple applications
Tunneling and applications; particle in a box
Structure and spectra of atoms
Lasers and applications
Electrons in solids (conductors, semi-conductors, insulators); transistor
Nuclear reactions, radiaoactivity. fusion and fission
Lab: Modern physics phenomena (e/m, Franck-Hertz, electron diffraction, atomic spectra

7. Class/laboratory schedule, i.e., number of sessions each week and duration of each session

2.5 credits; Lects: 28@50 min. (2 per week); Lab: 7@180 min. (7 per term)

8. Contribution of course to meeting the professional component

Math and Science, 100%.

9. Course objectives and relationship of course to program outcomes
The students will be able to:
Recognize the limitations of classical physics and appreciate the revolutionary nature of the Planck hypothesis, the de Broglie relation, and the Heisenberg uncertainty principle. (Program Outcome 1)
Appreciate the conceptual significance of the Schrödinger equation and learn to apply it by making appropriate assumptions to simplify, categorize, and analyze simple problems in terms of a quantum mechanical description. (Program Outcome 1)
Use non-relativistic quantum mechanics concepts to describe atomic structure and understand the details of the spectra of one-electron and multi-electron atoms; comprehend the significance of electron spin in the interpretation of atomic spectra. (Program Outcome 1)
Extend the concept of spontaneous emission to stimulated emission and the operating principle of a laser. (Program Outcome 1)
Apply the basic quantum concepts of isolated atoms to atoms in solids and explain the conduction properties of insulators, semi-conductors, and conductors on a microscopic basis and extend the concept to the principles behind n-p junctions and the transistor. (Program Outcome 1)
Extend the quantum concepts to the atomic nucleus and apply to radioactive decay processes. (Program Outcome 1)
Apply classroom concepts in the analysis and interpretation of lab experiments; develop ability to design independent experiments (Program Outcome 2)

10. Person(s) who prepared this description and date of preparation

Prepared by : K. Becker Date : June 3, 2003




Ch 107: General Chemistry I-A
Department, number, and title of course

Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Ch 107, General Chemistry I-A

2. Designation as a ‘Required’ or ‘Elective’ course

Required

3. Course (Catalog) Description

Elements, compounds, ions, stoichiometry, chemical reactions, solutions, gas laws, partial pressures, effusion, thermochemistry, atomic structure, periodicity, bonding, organic molecules,
nomenclatures, organic chemistry, hybridization, delocalization, polymers.

4. Prerequisite(s)

None

5. Textbook(s) and/or other required material

Jones and Atkins, Chemistry – Molecules, Matter & Change, 4th Edition, W.H. Freeman, 1999

6. Topics covered

Matter, measurements & moles,
Formulas and reactions
Precipitation reactions
Acid-base reactions
Redox reactions
Reaction stoichiometry
Properties of gases
Thermochemistry
Atomic structure and periodicity
Chemical bonds,
Molecular structure, hybridization and molecular orbital theory
Organic chemistry
Isomers and polymers

7. Class/laboratory schedule, i.e. number of sessions each week and duration of each session

2 credits; 1 1-hr lecture/week, 1 1-hr recitation/week

8. Contribution of course to meeting the professional component

Mathematics and Science 100%

9. Course objectives and relationship of course to program outcomes

The students will be able to:

Identify chemical compounds by name and formula
Balance chemical reaction equations and perform stoichiometric and mass-balance calculations
Predict the behavior of ideal and real gases when pressure, volume, temperature, molecular mass, etc. are varied
Perform basic thermochemical and energy balance calculations
Predict the physical and chemical behavior of chemical elements based on their position in the periodic table
Predict the physical and chemical properties of molecules according to their type of bonding and structure
Identify the structure and composition of organic molecules and their properties associated with functional groups
Recognize the different classes and properties of polymer molecules and their practical uses

10. Person who prepared this description and date of preparation

Prepared by: F. T. Jones Date: June 3, 2003





Ch 117: General Chemistry Laboratory I

Department, number, and title of course

Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Ch 117, General Chemistry Laboratory I

2. Designation as a ‘Required’ or ‘Elective’ course

Required

3. Course (Catalog) Description

Laboratory work to accompany Ch 107 or Ch 115; experiments of atomic spectra, stoichiometric analysis, qualitative analysis, organic and inorganic syntheses.

4. Prerequisite(s)

None; Corequisites Ch 107 or Ch115

5. Textbook(s) and/or other required material

J.A. Beran, Laboratory Manual for Principles of General Chemistry, 6th Edition Abridged, J. Wiley, 1999

6. Topics covered

Basic laboratory operations: use of burners, balances, pipets, and volumetric glassware and determination of melting and boiling points, solubility and density
Gravimetric analysis to determine the formula of a hydrated salt
Titration and back titration to determine strength of an antacid
Synthesis of an organic compound (aspirin) and analysis to determine yield
Fermentation
Constant-volume calorimetry
Spectroscopy
Polymers

7. Class/laboratory schedule, i.e. number of sessions each week and duration of each session

1 credit; 3 hrs/week

8. Contribution of course to meeting the professional component

Mathematics and Science 100%

9. Course objectives and relationship of course to program outcomes

The students will be able to:

Observe, record and manipulate data to the correct number of significant figures
Carry out chemical transfers and reactions safely
Perform titrations to reach an endpoint
Measure melting points of crystals to determine purity
Measure boiling points of liquids to determine purity
Carry out a one-step synthesis reaction safely and determine yield
Assemble and use an oxygen bomb calorimeter to determine thermodynamic quantities
Perform microassays on samples of metals and metalloids
Conduct a biological experiment using sterile techniques.

10. Person who prepared this description and date of preparation

Prepared by: F. T. Jones Date: June 3, 2003
CH 116: General Chemistry II
Department, number, and title of course

Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Ch 116, General Chemistry II

2. Designation as a ‘Required’ or ‘Elective’ course

Required

3. Course (Catalog) Description

Liquids and solids, phase changes, properties of solutions, kinetics, chemical equilibrium, strong and weak acids and bases, buffer solutions and titrations, solubility, thermodynamics, electrochemistry, properties of the elements.

4. Prerequisite(s)

Ch 107 or Ch 115

5. Textbook(s) and/or other required material

Jones and Atkins, Chemistry – Molecules, Matter & Change, 4th Edition, W.H. Freeman, 1999

6. Topics covered

Intermolecular forces and liquids
Solids, Phase changes
Solutions and solubility
Colligative properties
Chemical kinetics: Rates, Catalysis, Mechanisms
Chemical equilibrium and changes inequilibrium
Strong acids and bases; Weak acids and bases
Polyprotic acids; Aqueous equilibria and titrations
Buffer solutions, Solubility equilibria
Chemical thermodynamics, Free energy
Electrochemistry; Redox reactions, galvanic and electrolytic cells, free energy
Group trends: H compounds, Groups 1 and 2
Groups 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8 (13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18)

7. Class/laboratory schedule, i.e. number of sessions each week and duration of each session

3 credits; 2 1-hr lectures/week, 1 1-hr recitation/week

8. Contribution of course to meeting the professional component

Mathematics and Science 100%

9. Course objectives and relationship of course to program outcomes

The students will be able to:

Identify and perform calculations on materials with different crystalline structures
Calculate the dependence of pressure on temperature for multi-phase systems
Calculate composition and molecular masses from vapor pressure lowering, freezing point depression, boiling point elevation, and osmotic pressure data
Determine kinetic order of a chemical reaction from time-dependent data and predict the course of the reaction at other times
Evaluate reaction mechanisms to determine whether they are consistent with experimental data
Predict the effects of pressure, temperature, volume, etc. on chemical equilibrium, and calculate concentrations of each component under a specific set of conditions
Calculate the acidity of acid and base solutions, alone and in the course of titrations and neutralization reactions
Predict the acidity of buffer solutions
Use thermodynamic properties to determine the spontaneity of reactions
Calculate the voltage of electrochemical cells and at various compositions
Predict the properties of compounds based on trends in the period table

10. Person who prepared this description and date of preparation

Prepared by: F. T. Jones Date: June 3, 2003

Ch 118: General Chemistry Laboratory II
Department, number, and title of course

Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Ch 118, General Chemistry Laboratory II

2. Designation as a ‘Required’ or ‘Elective’ course

Required

3. Course (Catalog) Description

Laboratory work to accompany Ch 116: analytical techniques, gases, kinetics, equilibrium, acid-base titrations, oxidation-reduction reactions, electrochemical cells.

4. Prerequisite(s)

None; Corequisite: Ch 116

5. Textbook(s) and/or other required material

J.A. Beran, Laboratory Manual for Principles of General Chemistry, 6th Edition Abridged, J. Wiley, 1999

6. Topics covered

Vitamin C analysis
Determination of rate law
Paper chromatography
Gas chromatography
Analysis of packing peanuts
Qualitative analysis
Potentiometric analysis
Spectrophotometry
Electrochemistry

7. Class/laboratory schedule, i.e. number of sessions each week and duration of each session

1 credit; 3 hrs/week

8. Contribution of course to meeting the professional component

Mathematics and Science 100%


9. Course objectives and relationship of course to program outcomes

The students will be able to:
Carry out a reaction and use colorimetric titration to determine extent of reaction
Measure and analyze absorption spectra of different substances
Perform gas chromatographic analysis
Perform qualitative chemical tests to distinguish different polymeric materials
Conduct qualitative analysis scheme on unknown samples, using precipitation, centrifugation, complex formation, washing, etc.
Use glass electrodes and calomel electrodes to perform a potentiometric titration
Use spectrophotometer and Beer’s Law to determine strength of a weak acid
Construct and operate an electrolytic cell to plate out metals from solution

10. Person who prepared this description and date of preparation

Prepared by: F. T. Jones Date: June 5, 2003

Ma 115: Mathematical Analysis I

1. Department, number, and title of course

Department of Mathematical Sciences, Ma115, Mathematical Analysis I

2. Designation as a ‘Required’ or ‘Elective’ course

Required

3. Course (Catalog) Description

Functions of one variable, limits, continuity, derivatives, chain rule, maxima and minima, exponential and logarithm, inverse functions, antiderivatives, elementary differential equations, Riemann sums, the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus, vectors and determinants.

4. Prerequisite(s)

None

5. Textbook(s) and/or other required material

James Stewart, Calculus: Concepts and Contexts, 2nd Ed., Brooks/Cole Pub., 2001

6. Topics covered

Limits and derivatives (evaluation of limits; continuity; definition of the derivative; the derivative function; linear approximation using the tangent line)
Differentiation rules (product rule, quotient rule, chain rule; rules for polynomials, exponential and trigonometric functions; implicit differentiation; rules for logarithms and inverse trigonometric functions)
Applications of differentiation (curve sketching; optimization; indeterminate forms and L'Hospital's rule)
Integrals (Riemann sums and the definite integral; antiderivatives and the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus; method of substitution and integration by parts; improper integrals)
Applications of integration (areas; separable first-order differential equations)

7. Class/laboratory schedule, i.e., number of sessions each week and duration of each session

3 credits Lectures: 42 @ 50 min. Recitation: 14 @ 50 min.

8. Contribution of course to meeting the professional component

Mathematics and science, 100%.

9. Course objectives and relationship of course to program outcomes
The students will be able to:
explain the following fundamental concepts and definitions: the limit of a function, continuity, the derivative of a function (as a limit), antiderivatives, the definite integral (as the limit of Riemann sums), improper integrals. [Program Outcome 1]
calculate the derivative of any function composed of polynomial, exponential, trigonometric, and logarithmic functions. [Program Outcome 1]
recognize the most elementary antiderivatives and apply the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus to evaluate definite integrals. [Program Outcome 1]
correctly apply the method of substitution and integration by parts. [Program Outcome 1]
apply first and second derivative information to sketch the graph of a function of one variable. [Program Outcome 1]
solve elementary optimization problems: determine an appropriate objective function and apply differential calculus to find the extreme values. [Program Objective 1]
set up a definite integral for determining the area of a planar region. [Program Objective 1]
verify solutions to ordinary differential equations and use integration to solve simple separable differential equations. [Program Outcome 1]
use appropriate software (typically Matlab) for visualizing two-dimensional plots. [Program Outcome 3]

10. Person(s) who prepared this description and date of preparation

Prepared by : P. Miller Date : June 6, 2003

Ma 116: Mathematical Analysis II

1. Department, number, and title of course

Department of Mathematical Sciences, Ma116, Mathematical Analysis II

2. Designation as a ‘Required’ or ‘Elective’ course

Required

3. Course (Catalog) Description

Techniques of integration, infinite series and Taylor series, polar coordinates, double integrals, improper integrals, parametric curves, arc length, functions of several variables, partial derivatives, gradients and directional derivatives.

4. Prerequisite(s)

Ma115

5. Textbook(s) and/or other required material

James Stewart, Calculus: Concepts and Contexts, 2nd Ed., Brooks/Cole Pub., 2001

6. Topics covered

Sequences and infinite series (definitions of convergence; tests for convergence; power series, Taylor coefficient formula; local approximation with Taylor polynomials)
Vectors and vector-valued functions (dot product, cross product; applications to work and torque; equations of lines and planes in vector form; space curves as vector-valued functions; derivatives and integrals; application to the initial value problem for motion in space)
Differentiation for multivariable functions (visualization using graphs and level curves; partial derivatives, directional derivatives, chain rules; the gradient vector and its geometric significance; extreme values, second derivative test for functions of two variables; constrained optimization and Lagrange multipliers)
Multiple integrals (Riemann sums and double integrals over rectangles; iterated integrals and Fubini's Theorem; double integrals over general regions; review of polar coordinates; double integrals in polar coordinates)

7. Class/laboratory schedule, i.e., number of sessions each week and duration of each session

3 credits Lectures: 28 @ 50 min. Recitation: 14 @ 75 min.

8. Contribution of course to meeting the professional component

Mathematics and Science, 100%.

9. Course objectives and relationship of course to program outcomes
The students will be able to:
explain the following fundamental concepts and definitions: convergence of sequences, convergence of infinite series (sequence of partial sums), geometric interpretation of the dot product and cross product, directional derivatives and the geometric significance of the gradient vector, double integrals over rectangles (as the limit of Riemann sums), distinction between the double integral and the iterated integral. [Program Outcome 1]
construct Taylor polynomials as local approximations to a function of one variable. [Program Outcome 1]
recognize or derive the Taylor series for the exponential and trigonometric functions. [Program Outcome 1]
apply the Ratio Test to determine the radius of convergence for a given power series. [Program Outcome 1]
derive the equation of a line and a plane. [Program Outcome 1]
solve initial value problems for particle motion in 3-space and set up an integral for determining the length of a curve. [Program Outcome 1]
calculate partial derivatives, the gradient vector, and directional derivatives for any multivariable function. [Program Outcome 1]
Derive the linear approximation (first-order Taylor polynomial) for functions of two or three variables. [Program Outcome 1]
find critical points for functions of several variables; apply the second derivative test to determine the nature of the critical points for functions of two variables. [Program Outcome 1]
recognize and solve optimization problems involving one constraint and objective functions of two or three variables. [Program Objective 1]
set up and evaluate the iterated integrals associated with double integrals over general regions in the plane, including the use of polar coordinates when appropriate. [Program Outcome 1]
use appropriate software (typically Matlab) for visualizing functions of two variables, as a set of level curves and as a surface plot. [Program Outcome 3]

10. Person(s) who prepared this description and date of preparation

Prepared by : P. Miller Date : June 6, 2003


Ma 221: Mathematical Analysis III

1. Department, number, and title of course

Department of Mathematical Sciences, Ma 221, Mathematical Analysis III

2. Designation as a ‘Required’ or ‘Elective’ course

Required

3. Course (Catalog) Description

Ordinary differential equations of first and second order, homogeneous and nonhomogeneous equations, improper integrals, Laplace transforms, infinite sequences and series, series solutions of ordinary differential equations near an ordinary point, Boundary-value problems; orthogonal functions; Fourier series, separation of variables for partial differential equations.

4. Prerequisite(s)

Ma 115, Ma 116

5. Textbook(s) and/or other required material

Fundamentals of Differential Equations and Boundary Value Problems, Third Edition by R. Kent Nagle, Edward B. Staff & Arthur David Snider, Addison-Wesley 2001 ISBN: 0-201-33867-X

6. Topics covered

Solutions of differential equations, initial value problems, first order separable linear and exact equations
Differential operators, properties of solutions
Constant coefficient second order differential equations, principle of superposition, method of undetermined coefficients, variation of parameters
Cauchy-Euler equations
Laplace Transforms, solving second order differential equations with Laplace Transforms
Review of infinite series, Taylor series, Taylor series method, series solution near an ordinary point
Eigenvalues and eigenfunctions, orthogonal expansions, Fourier cosine and sine series
Separation of variables for partial differential equations, wave and heat equations



7. Class/laboratory schedule, i.e., number of sessions each week and duration of each session

Lectures: 28 @ 50 min. (2 sessions/week)
Recitations: 28 @ 50 min. (2 sessions/week)
Four Credits

8. Contribution of course to meeting the professional component

Mathematics and Science 100%

9. Course objectives and relationship of course to program outcomes
The students will be able to:
Solve ordinary and partial differential equations via a variety of methods and techniques
Understand the role that differential equations play in modeling physical phenomena.
Relationship to program outcomes: Outcome 1 - Scientific foundations – the ability to apply basic scientific knowledge

10. Person(s) who prepared this description and date of preparation

Prepared by: L. E. Levine Date: June 4, 2003

Ma 227: Mathematical Analysis IV
1. Department, number, and title of course

Department of Mathematical Sciences, Ma 227, Mathematical Analysis IV

2. Designation as a ‘Required’ or ‘Elective’ course

Required

3. Course (Catalog) Description

Matrices and determinants; Cramer's rule; row reduction of matrices; eigenvalues and eigenvectors; systems of linear equations; systems of differential equations; double and triple integrals; polar, cylindrical and spherical coordinates; surface and line integrals; integral theorems of Green, Gauss and Stokes.
4. Prerequisite(s)

Ma 115, Ma 116, Ma 221

5. Textbook(s) and/or other required material

Fundamentals of Differential Equations and Boundary Value Problems, Third Edition by R. Kent Nagle, Edward B. Staff & Arthur David Snider, Addison-Wesley 2001 ISBN: 0-201-33867-X

Calculus, Concepts and Contexts, Second Edition by James Stewart, Brooks/Cole. Second Edition 2001 ISBN: 0-534-37718-1

6. Topics covered

Review of matrices and vectors, systems of linear equations, eigenvalues and eigenvectors for matrices
Homogeneous linear systems of differential equations with constant coefficients
Nonhomogeneous linear systems of differential equations, the matrix exponential function
Double integrals in rectangular and polar coordinates, area of plane regions
Triple integrals in rectangular coordinates, cylindrical and spherical coordinates
Surface area
Vector valued functions, gradient, divergence, curl
Line integrals, path independence of line integrals, Green's Theorem
Parametric representations of surfaces
Surface integrals
Stokes Theorem and the Divergence (Gauss’) Theorem

7. Class/laboratory schedule, i.e., number of sessions each week and duration of each session

Lectures: 28 @ 50 min. (2 sessions/week)
Recitations: 14 @ 50 min. (1 session/week)
Three credits

8. Contribution of course to meeting the professional component

Mathematics and Science 100%

9. Course objectives and relationship of course to program outcomes
The students will be able to:
Solve systems of ordinary differential equations
Understand the role that systems of differential equations play in modeling physical phenomena.
Evaluate multiple integrals, line integrals, and surface integrals
Utilize the theorems of Green, Stokes and Gauss where appropriate in physical and engineering applications
Relationship to program outcomes: Outcome 1 - Scientific foundations – the ability to apply basic scientific knowledge

10. Person(s) who prepared this description and date of preparation

Prepared by: L. E. Levine Date: June 4, 2003

E 101: Engineering Seminar
1. Department, number, and title of course

E101 Engineering Seminar

2. Designation as a ‘Required’ or ‘Elective’ course

Required

3. Course (Catalog) Description

Properties of a fluid; basic flow analysis techniques; fluid kinematics; hydrostatics; manometry; pressure distribution in rigid body motion of a fluid; control volume analysis; conservation of mass; linear and angular momentum; Bernoulli and energy equations; dimensional analysis; viscous flow in pipes; flow metering devices; external flows; estimation of lift and drag; turbomachinery; open channel flow. Laboratory experiments to complement lecture on selected topics involving internal and external flows, modeling and simulation, instrumentation and fluid machinery.

4. Prerequisite(s)

none

5. Textbook(s) and/or other required material

none – website with resources (http://www.soe.stevens-tech.edu/Academics/e101.html)

6. Topics covered

Introductions and course overview
Why do you want to be an engineer?
Success strategies and competences
Goal setting and time management skills
The Engineering Curriculum and Technogenesis
Understanding yourself and others
Engineering professions and resources
Ethics in Engineering - you be the judge!
Creative thinking workshop

7. Class/laboratory schedule, i.e., number of sessions each week and duration of each session

Group meetings of sections 24 max for 1 hour per week, 1 credit
8. Contribution of course to meeting the professional component

Contributes to General Education 100%

9. Course objectives and relationship of course to program outcomes
The objectives and associated outcomes (in brackets) are:
to introduce students to the study of engineering and the engineering profession (Outcome 6)
provide an overview of the Stevens Engineering Curriculum, its tradition, structure and educational goals and the concepts of Technogenesis (Outcomes 6, 11 and 13)
to provide insight into being successful at Stevens and in life through understanding oneself and implementing good study and time management practices (Outcomes 6 and 12)
to introduce students to ethics in engineering (Outcomes 6 and 10)
provide awareness of resources on campus and online that can help with personal, educational and professional matters. In particular educate students on use of the Library (Outcomes 11 and 12).

10. Person(s) who prepared this description and date of preparation

Prepared by : K. Sheppard Date : June 2nd 2003

E 120: Engineering Graphics

1. Department, number, and title of the course E120 Engineering Graphics 2. Designation  Required 3. Course (catalog) description Engineering Graphics Engineering graphics principles of orthographic, and auxiliary projections, pictorial presentation of engineering designs, dimensioning and tolerance, sectional and detail views, assembly drawings. Descriptive geometry. Engineering figures and graphs. Solid modeling introduction to computer-aided design and manufacturing (CAD/CAM) using numerically controlled (NC) machines.4. Prerequisite(s)  None 5. Textbook(s) and/or other required material Engineering Design Graphics, J. H. Earle, Prentice Hall, 2000. 6. Topics covered  Introduction to SolidWorks modeling, Basic Functionality, Parts, assemblies, drawings, Shape features: boss, cut, hole, fillet, Operation features: chamfer, Extruded base feature, Revolved base feature, Document window, user interface, property manager, Basic geometry terminology, Base feature, Box: extruded base, fillet, shell, extruded cut, Dimensions & geometric relationships Multiple views, 2D sketch, Add dimensions, , Features and Commands, Default planes, isometric view, section view, Sketch status, Geometric relations, Graphics definitions, Geometric basics, Orthographic projections, Commands to make solid model into a 3 view drawing Assembly Basics, Mates and degrees of freedom, Local component pattern, Bolts & Screws, Drag & Drop Assembly, Threads, Standards/Libraries, Dimensions, Dimension Guidelines Revolve and Sweep Features, Revolve feature, Loft, Create simple loft feature, Design Tables, Families of parts, Design tables, Renaming features and dimensions, Dimensions, tolerances, clearances, interferences, Assembly, exploded views, E-drawings, Export to PowerPoint, import into PowerPoint. 7. Class/laboratory schedule, i.e., number of sessions each week and duration of each session 1 ¼ Hour/ Week, Students required to perform additional 2-3 hours of self-study 
8. Contribution of course to meeting the professional component The course imparts fundamental engineering graphics knowledge, three-dimensional solid modeling skils along with skills for creation, reading and interpretation of 2D drawings. 9. Course objectives and relationship of course to program outcomes 
Program Outcome (3): The students will have the ability to effectively use:
software for preparing, transmitting, and displaying multimedia documents, including technical drawings/presentations; Prepare graphical presentations that can be understood both by technical and non-technical audiences.

Program Outcome (4):The student will be able to:
visualize objects (parts/assemblies) and represent them using standard graphical methodologiesVisualize objects by designing simple geometrical forms.
Polygons, Prisms, Cones, Spheres, Sheet Metal Features

The student will be able to utilize design equations to specify units or components,
Given appropriate input and desired outputs, the students will be able to specify the characteristics of the component or unit required for its construction or acquisition.


Program Outcome (5): The student will be able to produce final specifications, technical drawings, and plans; Prepare final technical drawings and specifications of parts and assemblies, including BOM. Working Drawings

The students will be able to apply creative and critical thinking skills Use industry standard software to learn how to create sketches, parts, assemblies and technical drawings.

 10. Person(s) who prepared this description and date of preparation Prepared by
Kishore Pochiraju

Date
5th June 2003.


E 121: Engineering Design I

1. Department, number, and title of course
Interdepartmental, E121, Engineering Design I
2. Designation as a ‘Required’ or ‘Elective’ course
Required
3. Course (Catalog) Description
This course introduces students to the process of design and seeks to engage their enthusiasm for engineering from the very beginning of the program. The engineering method is used in design and manufacture of a product. Product dissection is exploited to evaluate how others have solved design products. Development is started of competencies in professional practice topics, primarily: effective group participation, project management, cost estimation, communication skills and ethics. Engineering Design I is linked to and taught concurrent with the Engineering Graphics course. Engineering graphics are used in the design projects and the theme of “fit to form” is developed.

4. Prerequisite(s)
Corequisite E120

5. Textbook(s) and/or other required material
All required material is available online via Web Course Tools.

6. Topics covered

Using measurement tools including a caliper and micrometer
Introduction to freehand sketching, isometric drawings and orthogonal projections
Use of hand held and common machine tools, including drill press, band saw, belt sander, scroll saw, soldering iron
Introduction to computer numerically controlled machines
Understanding design drawings, including assembly, subassembly and cross section views
Reverse engineering and design improvement via product disassembly
Product costing including labor, material, overhead, direct vs. indirect, fixed vs. variable
Multidisciplinary design including aspects of electrical, computer and mechanical engineering via a project based learning experience (robot project)
Introduction to flowcharting techniques and programming using BASI-C
Project management including roles and responsibilities, work breakdown structure, Gantt chart, Project 2002 scheduling software
Technical report writing using Word and oral presentation skills using PowerPoint

7. Class/laboratory schedule, i.e., number of sessions each week and duration of each session

Laboratory: 14 sessions @ 2 hours and 50 minutes (1 session/week) 2 Credits.

8. Contribution of course to meeting the professional component

Contributes to the “Engineering Design” part of “Engineering Topics”.

Course objectives and relationship of course to program outcomes

Provide an early introduction to engineering design and the engineering design process through hands on experiences, including: (Outcome 4)
Disassembly of a common device to conduct design and reverse engineering analyses
Participation in a project-based learning experience that requires assessment of needs, identification of alternative solutions, evaluation of those alternatives, and successful implementation of resulting designs
Use product analysis to introduce engineering drawings and their significance, including assembly/sub-assembly drawings, cross sections, dimensioning, and correlation of drawings to parts lists. (Outcome 4)
Use product analysis to introduce concepts of product costing, including a basic understanding of direct and indirect, overhead, variable and fixed costs. (Outcome 13)
Use the project based learning experience to provide a link to the concurrent Engineering Graphics course, E120, enabling the use of three dimensional drawing software. (Outcome 3)
Use the project based learning experience to expose students to a teamwork environment, identifying basic issues that affect group dynamics and providing guidance to optimize team success. (Outcome 8)
Use the project based learning experience to introduce students to a wide variety of engineering design and development activities, including aspects of mechanical design, electronic circuit design, software design, and system test and integration. (Outcome 4)
Teach proper use of measuring tools such as micrometer and caliper gage to support the characterization of a complex three dimensional object. (Outcome 3)
Introduce basic Machine Shop practice/safety and simple tooling techniques, including sawing, drilling, tapping, grinding/sanding, and soldering. (Outcome 3)
Introduce basic concepts of project management, including Work Breakdown Structure, Gantt Charts, clear identification of major program milestones, and clear individual roles and responsibilities. (Outcome 6)
Introduce basic requirements for good technical report organization/writing and oral presentation skills. (Outcome 9)

10. Person(s) who prepared this description and date of preparation

Prepared by: E. Blicharz Date: June 5, 2003
E 122: Engineering Design II
1. Department, number, and title of course
Interdepartmental, E122, Engineering Design II
2. Designation as a ‘Required’ or ‘Elective’ course
Required
3. Course (Catalog) Description
This course continues the freshman year experience in design. The design projects are linked to the Mechanics of Solids course (integrated Statics and Strength of Materials) taught concurrently. The engineering method introduced in Engineering Design I is reinforced. Further introduction of professional practice topics are linked to their application and testing in case studies and project work. Basic concepts of design for environment and aesthetics are introduced.
4. Prerequisite(s)
Pre requisite E121; Corequisite E126
5. Textbook(s) and/or other required material
All required material is available online via Web Course Tools.

6. Topics covered

Concepts of load, force, shear/flexural/axial stress, strain, compression, tension
Material classes: Metals, Polymers, Elastomers, Ceramics, Glasses, Composites
Material properties: density, stiffness, modulus of elasticity, ductility, thermal and electrical conductivity, melting point, thermal expansion/shock, creep, corrosion
Tensile testing: stress vs. strain plots, Young’s Modulus, elastic vs. plastic behavior, yield strength, proportional limit, ultimate tensile strength
Experimentation based on factor of safety, column buckling, static friction, flexural stress and stress concentration
Planar truss design and construction: Concepts include load and force analysis, design to maximize performance criteria, failure load and member prediction, test to failure
Gantry Hoist design and construction, including I-beam and supporting trusses. Concepts include scaling, design to shear, flexural and axial stress specifications, factor of safety, strain prediction and measurement
Business skills including working in teams, group dynamics, Quality Functional Deployment, time value of money, net present value, future value

7. Class/laboratory schedule, i.e., number of sessions each week and duration of each session

Laboratory: 14 sessions @ 2 hours and 50 minutes (1 session/week) 2 Credits.

8. Contribution of course to meeting the professional component

Contributes primarily (75%) to the “Engineering Design” and secondarily (25%) to the “Engineering Science” part of “Engineering Topics”.

Course objectives and relationship of course to program outcomes

Discuss and demonstrate the “Tensile Test” and resulting stress vs. strain data as a tool for characterizing material properties and behavior. (Outcome 1)
Use product design analysis during disassembly of a household bathroom scale to understand a typical application of stress/strain theory. (Outcome 2)
Introduce the theory of operation of a strain gauge, requiring its use to take measurements in a related design project. (Outcome 2)
Introduce the major classes of engineering materials including polymers, metals, ceramics, glasses, elastomers, and composites and discuss their engineering properties to enable optimum material selection during design activities. (Outcome 1)
Introduce various manufacturing processes associated with each material class, including examples of injection molding, extrusion, blow molding, casting, and machining. (Outcome 1)
Conduct experiments, taking quantitative data for analysis and comparison to predicted theoretical values in these areas of materials science: Factor of Safety, Static Friction, Column Buckling, Flexural Stress and Stress Concentration in beams. (Outcome 2)
Conduct two multi-week project based learning experiences (Planar Truss and Gantry Hoist) to support co-requisite Mechanicals of Solids course and to provide an environment that will enable students to:
Assess design requirements and develop alternate solutions trying to optimize design parameters. (Outcome 4)
Implement final designs using hands-on construction techniques, while exercising quality workmanship to strengthen their designs. (Outcome 3)
Instrument final designs with sensors to measure design parameters under stressed conditions and compare actual results against predicted theory. (Outcome 2)
Operate in an environment requiring teamwork and cooperation to optimize success. (Outcome 8)
Introduce the concept of data variability as measured statistically by the “standard deviation”, and include statistical analysis in lab data collection activities. (Outcome 2)
Develop competence in computer based tools, including Web CT, ELI-CA Truss Analysis, Excel, Word and PowerPoint. (Outcome 3)
Augment project management and general business knowledge skills by introducing industry standard techniques and tools including Quality Functional Deployment (QFD) and Time Value of Money concepts for Net Present Value calculations. (Outcome 13)

10. Person(s) who prepared this description and date of preparation

Prepared by: E. Blicharz Date: June 5, 2003

E 126: Mechanics of Solids
1. Department, number, and title of course

School of Engineering, E126, Mechanics of Solids

2. Designation as a ‘Required’ or ‘Elective’ course

Required

3. Course (Catalog) Description

Fundamental concepts of particle statics, equivalent force systems, equilibrium of rigid bodies, analysis of trusses and frames, forces in beams and machine parts, stress and strain, tension, shear and bending moment, flexure, combined loading, energy methods, statically indeterminate structures.

4. Prerequisite(s)

PEP101 or PEP111, Ma115

5. Textbook(s) and/or other required material

W.F. Riley, L.D. Sturges and D.H. Morris, Statics and Mechanics of Materials, Second Edition, John Wiley and Sons Inc., 2002 ISBN #0 471 43446 9

6. Topics covered

Concurrent Force Systems
Equilibrium of a Particle
Stress, Strain & Deformation - Axial Loading
Equivalent Force / Moment Systems
Equilibrium of Rigid Bodies
Trusses, Frames, and Machines
Flexural Loading: Stresses in Beams
Flexural Loading: Beam Deflection
Torsional Loading: Shafts
Combined Static Loading

7. Class/laboratory schedule, i.e., number of sessions each week and duration of each session

Lectures: 28 @ 75 min. (2 sessions/week) Recitation: 1 @ 50 min.

8. Contribution of course to meeting the professional component

Contributes to the “Engineering Science” part of “Engineering Topics”. See Course Objectives in Item 9 below.

9. Course objectives and relationship of course to program outcomes
The students will be able to:
understand and apply the definitions of stress (normal and shear), strain and deformation. (Program Outcome 1A&B)
understand and use the definition of mechanical properties including: modulus of elasticity, shear modulus, poisson’s ratio. (Program Outcome 1A&B)
determine geometrical properties including: centroid of composite areas, area moment of inertia, polar moment of inertia. (Program Outcome 1A&B)
determine resultants of systems of forces and moments in two-dimensional systems. (Program Outcome 1A&B)
solve problems of equilibrium of particles with emphasis on two-dimensional equilibrium. (Program Outcome 1C)
solve problems of equilibrium of rigid bodies with emphasis on two-dimensional equilibrium. (Program Outcome 1C)
analyze engineering structures including: trusses (method of joints, method of sections, zero force members), frames, and machines. (Program Outcome 1C)
determine internal forces in beams including shear and bending moment diagrams, critical points (maximum shear and maximum bending moment) and their role in engineering design. (Program Outcome 1C)
determine normal and shear stresses in structural member subjected to axial loading, bending, and/or torsion. (Program Outcome 1C)
Use engineering software such as MDSolids or Excel spreadsheet to solve problems related to Mechanics of Solids. (Program Outcome 3)
Perform simplified design calculations to determine the size, load, or mechanical property required to meet a specified design criterion (e.g. maximum allowable stress). (Program Outcome 4)

10. Person(s) who prepared this description and date of preparation

Prepared by: H. Hadim Date: January 30, 2003


E 231: Engineering Design III
1. Department, number, and title of course

Interdepartmental, E231, Engineering Design III

2. Designation as a ‘Required’ or ‘Elective’ course

Required

3. Course (Catalog) Description

This course continues the experiential sequence in design. The design projects are linked with the Thermodynamics/Energy Conversion and Circuits courses taught concurrently. The core design themes are further developed.

4. Prerequisite(s)

Pre requisite E122; Corequisites E234 and E245

5. Textbook(s) and/or other required material

All required material is available online via Web Course Tools.

6. Topics covered

Basic thermodynamic systems: closed, open and isolated systems; state and equilibrium; processes and cycles
Macroscopic thermodynamic system properties including mass, volume, energy, temperature, pressure and their measurement
Thermodynamic system equilibrium including mechanical, chemical, and thermal
Phase change processes for pure substances and binary systems
Saturation curve for water
Operation of hydrogen-oxygen fuel cell
Operation of solar cell and water electrolyzer
Solar energy conversion and storage techniques

7. Class/laboratory schedule, i.e., number of sessions each week and duration of each session

Laboratory: 14 sessions @ 2 hours and 50 minutes (1 session/week) 2 Credits.

8. Contribution of course to meeting the professional component

Contributes primarily (75%) to the “Engineering Design” and secondarily (25%) to the “Engineering Science” part of “Engineering Topics”.

Course objectives and relationship of course to program outcomes

Explain verbally and schematically the energy flows and overall energetic performance of a common thermal appliance (e.g. coffeemaker). (Outcome 1)
Experimentally compare, using thermodynamic principles, different designs of a commercially available product from two different manufacturers. (Outcomes 1, 2, 3)
As a group, design and construct a working open thermodynamic system to meet given constraints and specifications (e.g. heat actuated pump). (Outcomes 3, 4, 5, 8)
Conduct experiments taking basic thermodynamic and electrical measurements including temperature, pressure, electrical power, current, voltage and resistance. (Outcomes 2, 3)
Explain, based on experimentation, the characteristics of phase change for both pure and binary systems. (Outcome 2)
Describe, both orally and in writing, the conceptual and physical solutions of several design projects (e.g. Life Support and Solar Energy Storage/Conversion) emphasizing thermodynamic concepts and features. (Outcomes 4, 5, 9)
Specify and order components, logically and rationally, with attention to size, cost, materials, etc. to implement a design project. (Outcomes 1, 5)

10. Person(s) who prepared this description and date of preparation

Prepared by: E. Blicharz Date: June 5, 2003

E 232: Engineering Design IV
1. Department, number, and title of course

E 232 Engineering Design IV

2. Designation as a ‘Required’ or ‘Elective’ course

Required

3. Course (Catalog) Description

This course continues the experiential sequence in design. The design projects link with the Electronics and Instrumentation course taught concurrently. The core design themes are further developed.

4. Prerequisite(s)

E 231, Co-requisite E 246

5. Textbook(s) and/or other required material

no textbook – course materials provided through WebCT webpage.

6. Topics covered

Class 1 Matlab Tutorial
Class 2 LabView Tutorial
Class 3 Operational Amplifiers and Use of Instruments
Class 4 Sensor Circuits I
Build and test differential amplifier. Apply to temperature sensor.
Class 5 Sensor Circuits II
Review operation of additional sensors and apply amplifier to measure output with associated considerations.
Class 6- 7 A/D Conversion and Digital Signal Processing
Collect data using LabView program from a sensor system previously constructed. Use Matlab to analyze data.
Class 8 Introduction to Design Project
Simulink Tutorial using example of filling/emptying of plating tank with simple on-off control of valves.
Class 9 - 13 Design Project (Five classes)
Phased with just-in-time modules on control, marketing, economics etc.
Class 14 Project Presentations

7. Class/laboratory schedule, i.e., number of sessions each week and duration of each session

Laboratory: one 3 hour session per week, 2 credits

8. Contribution of course to meeting the professional component

Contributes to “Engineering Topics” with 30% Engineering Science and 70% Engineering Design

9. Course objectives and relationship of course to program outcomes
Use LabView software to interface a student-built sensor circuit for P.C based data acquisition and condition sensor output (Outcome 2)
Use MatLab to analyze sensor circuit responses (Outcome 3)
Use Simulink to simulate system developed in the design project (Outcome 3)
Analyze and predict response of sensor circuits (Outcome 4)
Simulate dynamical response of the system design in the major project (Outcome 4)
Develop control strategy modeled in Simulink as part of the major design project (Outcome 4)
Team plans project via task breakdown and Gantt chart for design project (Outcome 6)
Students will demonstrate and be evaluated on their individual contributions to team deliverables (Outcome 8).
Students make effective PowerPoint presentation of design project to peers and instructor (Outcome 9)

10. Person(s) who prepared this description and date of preparation

Prepared by : K. Sheppard Date : June 2nd 2003
E 234: Thermodynamics and Energy Conversion
1. Department, number, and title of course

E 234 Thermodynamics and Energy Conversion

2. Designation as a ‘Required’ or ‘Elective’ course

Required

3. Course (Catalog) Description

Concepts of heat and work, first and second laws for closed and open systems including steady processes and cycles, thermodynamic properties of substances and interrelationships, phase change and phase equilibrium, chemical reactions and chemical equilibrium, representative applications. Introduction to energy conversion systems including direct energy conversion in fuel cells, photovoltaic systems, etc. (4-0-4)

4. Prerequisite(s)

PEP 101, Ch 107, Ma 115

5. Textbook(s) and/or other required material

“Thermodynamics – An Engineering Approach”, Y. Cengal and M. Boles, 4th edition, McGraw-Hill, 2002
– course materials provided through WebCT webpage.

6. Topics covered

Basic Topics
Properties of pure substances
1st law for closed systems
2nd law
Entropy
Deviations from ideal behavior
Control volumes
Power cycles
Energy conversion
Phase equilibria and chemical thermodynamics

7. Class/laboratory schedule, i.e., number of sessions each week and duration of each session

Lecture 3 hours per week, recitation 1 hour per week. 4 credits.
8. Contribution of course to meeting the professional component

Contributes to “Engineering Topics” 100% Engineering

9. Course objectives and relationship of course to program outcomes
The course is aimed at developing the ability to analyze a problem logically for its thermodynamic content, to integrate thermodynamic considerations with other aspects of problem solving, to enunciate clearly both verbally and mathematically the laws of thermodynamics and some of their important applications and implications for engineering practice, to characterize qualitatively and quantitatively the energy flows and transfers in a variety of physical/chemical situations, to select and evaluate appropriate parameters describing the energetic performance of various devices and systems and to determine the thermodynamic constraints on this performance, and to describe cogently, both verbally and graphically (schematically), major energy conversion devices and systems.
Objectives 1 and 4 are the primary ones addressed.
10. Person(s) who prepared this description and date of preparation

Prepared by : K. Sheppard Date : June 2nd 2003



E 243: Probability and Statistics for Engineers
1. Department, number, and title of course

E 243 Probability and Statistics for Engineers

2. Designation as a ‘Required’ or ‘Elective’ course

Required

3. Course (Catalog) Description
Descriptive statistics, pictorial and tabular methods, measures of location and of variability sample space and events, probability and independence, Bayes formula discrete random variables, densities and moments, normal, gamma, exponential and Weibull distributions, distribution of the sum and average of random samples, the central limit theorem, confidence intervals for the mean and the variance, hypothesis testing and p-values, applications for prediction in a regression model. A statistical computer package is used throughout the course for teaching and for project assignments.

4. Prerequisite(s)

Ma 116
5. Textbook(s) and/or other required material

“Probability and Statistics for Engineers and Scientists” 7th Edition
By: Walpole, Myers and Myers and Ye, Prentice Hall


6. Topics covered
Data Analysis, Descriptive Statistics, Data Presentation
Counting Rules, combinations and permutations.
Introduction to probability, sets, Venn Diagrams, axiomatic definition of probability,
Conditional probability, Bayes Rule
Random variables, discrete and continuous variables, probability cumulative distributions, probability mass functions and probability density functions.
Expected values; mean, variance: expected values of functions of one or more random variables, covariance and correlation coefficient
Discrete Probability Distributions: Bernoulli trials and the binomial distribution, the multinomial, negative binomial, hypergeometric, geometric and Poisson distributions
Continuous distributions, normal, gamma, and exponential
Random sampling, sampling distribution of means, and variances, central limit theorem.
Confidence intervals for prediction of population parameters: means, difference of two means, proportion, variance and the ratio of two variances
Hypothesis testing
Linear regression and multiple regression





7. Class/laboratory schedule, i.e., number of sessions each week and duration of each session
3 credits

Lectures: 28 @ 50 min. (2 sessions/week) Recitations: 14@ 50 min (1 session/week)

8. Contribution of course to meeting the professional component

Contributes to the “Math and Basic Science” part of the Engineering Curriculum. See Course Objectives in Item 9 below.

9. Course objectives and relationship of course to program outcomes
The students will be able to:
present data in tabular and graphical forms for preliminary analysis, visual inspection end error detection using spreadsheet software such as Excel (Outcome 3)
use statistical software to perform descriptive statistical analysis and correlation analysis (Outcome 3)
understand what a probability mass function or probability density function is, what its mathematical properties are and how they may be used to answer questions about the probability distribution of the random variables (Outcome 1)
know when, and how, and under what circumstances, you would apply the binomial distribution or the Poisson distribution (Outcome 1)
know when, and how, and under what circumstances, you would apply the normal, exponential or gamma distributions. (Outcome 1)
estimate population parameters from sample statistics and provide confidence intervals for these estimates (Outcome 1)
create and test statistical hypotheses at a specified significance level. (Outcome 1)

use either simple or multiple linear regression analysis to derive predictive models for the dependent variable using one or more independent variables. (Outcome 1)
apply backward elimination procedures on a large data set to derive regression models and determine the relationship between the response (output) and the independent variables (Outcome 1)

10. Person(s) who prepared this description and date of preparation

Prepared by: R. I. Hires Date: June 3, 2003



E 245 Circuits and Systems
Interdepartmental Engineering
1. Catalog Description: Ideal circuit elements, Kirchoff laws and nodal analysis, source transformations, Thevenin/Norton theorems, operational amplifiers, response of RC, RL, and RLC circuits, sinusoidal sources and steady state analysis, analysis in the frequency domain, average and RMS power, linear and ideal transformers, linear models for transistors and diodes, analysis in the s-domain, Laplace transforms, transfer functions. (2,3,3).
2. Prerequisites: PEP 102 or PEP 112. Co-requisite MA 226
3. Textbook: J. David Irwin, Basic Engineering Circuit Analysis, 7e, John Wiley, 2002.
4. Topics Covered:
Resistive circuits : introduction to circuit elements, Ohm s law and Kirchoff s law, single loop circuits, single node pair circuits, series and parallel resistor combinations, circuits with series and parallel combinations, Wye ”! Delta transformations, circuits with dependent sources.
Nodal and Loop analysis : nodal analysis, loop analysis, circuits with operational amplifiers.
Additional analysis techniques : linearity, homogeneity, superposition, Thevenin’s and Norton’s theorems, maximum power transfer
Capacitance and Inductance : capcitors, inductors, their current voltage relations and their combination in series and in parallel, RC operational amplifier circuits.
First and second order circuits : first order circuits, second order circuits
AC steady state analysis : sinusoids and complex forcing functions, phasors, impedance and admittance
Magnetically coupled networks : Mutual inductance, energy analysis, ideal transformer.
Steady state power analysis : instantaneous power, average power and rms power.

5. Class/Laboratory Schedule: (14 weeks)
Lectures: Two 1 hour lectures/week. Laboratories: One 3 hour lab per week
6. Contribution to meeting professional component
Contributes to the “Engineering Science” part of “Engineering Topics”. See Course Assessment Performance Criteria (APCs) in Item 8 below
7. Relation of objectives to outcomes
(Outcome 1) The students will be able to (detailed curriculum performance criteria in brackets):

Solve DC circuits using Kirchoff's current & voltage equations (simultaneous linear equations). (1A1)
Determine the transient response of RC and RL circuits. (first order differential equations). (1A1)
Understand the concept of capacitor and its relationship to electric fields/parallel ; the concept of the inductor and its relationship to magnetic fields due to currents in wires and the concept of resistance and its relationship to charge flow under the presence of an electric field. (1B2)
Determine currents and voltages in circuits with voltage/current sources and R, L, and C components (circuits with passive components) ; apply circuit theorems (Thevenin's, Norton's, superposition, source transformation, parallel/series element combinations) to simplify the analysis of circuits and construct basic circuits and measure currents and voltages within those circuits. (1C4)
(Outcome 3)
The student will be able to use oscilloscopes, function generators, multimeters, and power supplies in combination with custom circuits built using prototype boards for electrical measurements and characterization of electronic systems. (3C2)
(Outcome 4)
Understand and use the Wye-Delta transformation on the circuits to analyze it. (4A4)
Use simplified equivalent representations (Thevenin/Norton equivalents) to evaluate the interaction between a complex circuit and external components. (4A4)
Understand the redistribution of voltage drops in resistive circuits with changes in values of resistors in series and the redistribution of current flow through resistors with changes in the values of resistors in parallel. (4B1)
Understand the changes in exponential voltage/current waveforms with with changes in the values of R, L, or C for RC and RL circuits. (4B1)
Understand the application of the superposition theorem to allow use of multiple voltage/current sources within a circuit. (4B1)
Understand the equivalencies of voltage and current sources when the transformation theorem can be applied (V-R in series vs I-R in parallel). (4B1)

Prepared by: K.P. Subbalakshmi Date : March 07, 2003

E 246 Electronics and Instrumentation
Interdepartmental Engineering
1. Catalog Description: Signal acquisition procedures, instrumentation components, electronic amplifiers, signal conditioning, low-pass, high-pass, and band-pass filters, A/D converters and antialiasing filters, embedded control and instrumentation, microcontrollers, digital and analog I/O, instruments for measuring physical quantities such as motion, force, torque, temperature, pressure, etc., FFT and elements of modern spectral analysis, random signals, standard deviation and bias (2,3,3).
2. Prerequisites: E245
3. Textbook: J. R. Cogdell, Foundations of Electrical Engineering, 2nd edition, 1995, Prentice Hall. F. T. Boesch, Complete Lecture Notes for E 246, 2000, Stevens Bookstore
4. Topics Covered:
Analysis of simple circuits containing ideal diodes.
Design of 1/2-wave & full-wave rectifiers.
Using Boolean algebra to find a polynomial switching function.
Error analysis of simple electrical circuits.
Design of a peak rectifier ( battery eliminator ) with a specified ripple factor.
Analysis of non-ideal diode circuits using piecewise linear circuit models.
Design dc bias circuit of a one stage transistor circuit, using d.c. circuit models for the transistor, to optimize the performance as an ac amplifier for both Bipolar Junction
Transistors and Field Effect Transistors.
Derive ac performance of single-stage FET and BJT circuits using a.c. circuit models for the transistor .
Design of electronic realizations of switching functions using various logic gates.
Design of an eight level simple analog to digital converter using comparators.
Analysis of the electrical performance of wheatstone bridges, strain gauges, position and pressure transducers, and thermistors.

5. Class/Laboratory Schedule: (14 weeks)
Lectures: Two 1 hour lectures/week. Laboratories: One 3 hour lab per week
6. Contribution to meeting professional component
Contributes to the “Engineering Science” part of “Engineering Topics”. See Course Assessment Performance Criteria (APCs) in Item 7 below
7. Relation of objectives to outcomes
(Outcome 1) The students will be able to (detailed curriculum performance criteria in brackets):
Analyze simple circuits containing ideal diodes. (1A1)
Design 1/2-wave & full-wave rectifiers. (1A1)
Use Boolean algebra to find a polynomial expression for a general switching function. (1A2)
Perform an error analysis of simple electrical circuits. (1A2)
Design and analyze a peak rectifier ( battery eliminator ) with a specified ripple factor. (1C4)
Analyze non-ideal diode circuits using piecewise linear circuit models. (1C4)
Analyze and design the dc bias circuit of a one stage transistor circuit, using d.c. circuit models for the transistor, to optimize the performance as an ac amplifier. They will do this for both Bipolar Junction Transistors (BJT) and Field Effect Transistors(FET). (1C4)
Derive exact formulas for the ac Mid-band performance of single-stage FET and BJT circuits using a.c. circuit models for the transistor. (1C4)
Design electronic realizations of switching functions using various logic gates. (1C4)
Design an eight level simple analog to digital converter using comparators. (1C4)
Analyze the electrical performance of wheatstone bridges, strain gauges, position & pressure transducers, and thermistors. (1C4)
Design integrators, difference amplifiers, and inverting amplifiers using Op-Amps. (1C4)
Derive the relationship between the open-loop and closed loop gains of a feedback circuit. (1C4)
Derive the effect of feedback on sensitivity and bandwidth. (1C4)
Derive exact formulas for the frequency spectrum of the ramp, the half-rectified wave, the full-rectified wave, and the square wave. (1C5)
Design simple passive low-pass and band-pass filters using Bode plots. (1C5)
Design simple passive band-pass tuned circuits using the universal resonance curve. (1C5)
Derive exact formulas for oscillations in a second order systems with positive feedback. (1C5)

Prepared by: F. T. Boesch Date : March 12, 2003




E 321: Design V
1. Department, number, and title of course

E321, Design V

2. Designation as a ‘Required’ or ‘Elective’ course

Required

3. Course (Catalog) Description

This course will include both experimentation and open-ended design problems that are integrated with the Materials Processing course taught concurrently. Core design themes will be further developed.

4. Prerequisite(s)

E344 (co or pre requisite)

5. Textbook(s) and/or other required material

Materials Science and Engineering : An Introduction, 6th edition
by William D. Callister, Wiley (2002)

6. Topics covered

1. Materials Properties: Density and Hardness

2. Reverse Design I - The Hard Disk Drive

3. Corrosion and Electroplating

4. Metal Casting

5. The Solar Cell - Part I

6. The Solar Cell - Part II

7. Tensile Testing

8. Work Hardening of Metals

9. Phase Diagram Determination

10. Effects of processing on Steel Structure and Properties

11. Reverse Design II - The Hard Disk Drive

7. Class/laboratory schedule, i.e., number of sessions each week and duration of each session

Lectures: none Laboratory: 1 @ 120 minutes; typically 5-18 different sections of the lab are offered each semester depending on the semester and the course enrollment.

8. Contribution of course to meeting the professional component

Contributes to Engineering Topics (Engineering Science approx 60% and Engineering Design 40%)

9. Course objectives and relationship of course to program outcomes

Students will be able to:

1. Identify the five major classes of engineering materials
and give examples where each is used.

2. Identify the principal materials properties relevant for a
given engineering application and be able to select one
or more materials or materials systems suitable for that
particular application best satisfying that set of properties.

3. Describe the needed inputs and desired outputs associated
with major tools and instrumentation used to process materials,
establish their structure and microstructure, and assess their
properties.

10. Person(s) who prepared this description and date of preparation

Prepared by : M. Libera Date : 3 June, 2003

E 344: Materials Processing
1. Department, number, and title of course

E344: Materials Processing

2. Designation as a ‘Required’ or ‘Elective’ course

Required

3. Course (Catalog) Description

An introduction is provided to the important engineering properties of materials, to the scientific understanding of those properties and to the methods of controlling them. This is provided in the context of the processing of materials to produce products.

4. Prerequisite(s)

Ch 116 and Ch 118

5. Textbook(s) and/or other required material

Callister, William D. Jr. Materials Science and Engineering, an Introduction, J. Wiley and Sons, 6th edition, 2003

6. Topics covered

The types of chemical bond and electron energies; and their influence on various properties of materials.
Crystal structures, polycrystalline materials, defects and their importance in governing material properties.
Electric conduction in metals and semiconductors as they relate to the chemical bond, pn junctions and their applications, processing of integrated circuits.
Dielectrics and optical materials and their utilization in modern signal processing.
Mechanical properties of materials, their dependence on materials structure and composition and their control by materials processing.
Phase diagrams and their application in the processing of metallic alloys.
The principal ferrous and non ferrous alloys.
Ceramics and glasses, their properties and processing.
Polymers, composition, structure, processing and properties.
Composites, their processing and properties.

7. Class/laboratory schedule, i.e., number of sessions each week and duration of each session

Lectures: 28 @ 75 min. (2 sessions/week) 3 credits

8. Contribution of course to meeting the professional component
Contributes to the “Engineering Science” (80%) and “Engineering Design” (20%) of “Engineering Topics”.

9. Course objectives and relationship of course to program outcomes
The students will be able to recognize the classes of engineering materials, understand the general relation between processing, structure and properties, and use these topics in materials selection (Outcome 1)
This is the subject of the entire course, all topics under 6 above

“recognize mathematical parameters as if they were physical variables and vice-versa”. (Outcome 1)
Throughout the course, emphasis is on physical reality and all formulae and equations are discussed as “a language describing the physical reality”.

The students will be able to apply relevant concepts of electric and magnetic fields, atomic structure, periodic properties, chemical bonding, molecular geometry, bonding theories, thermochemistry: (Outcome 1)
This outcome is served by the entire course.

..resolve mechanical problems involving equilibrium, stresses, strains, deformation, stability and safety factors. (Outcome 1)
This outcome is served from the viewpoint of the processing, properties and utilization of materials.

The students will be able to identify technical relationships between the input, output and variable and use the relationships to predict mutual changes: (Outcome 4)
This outcome is served in the processing of materials.

“… specify the product, function, or service of the system in terms of customer requirements, cost, and engineering performance criteria. (Outcome 5)
This outcome is served in the various material processing in discussion and homework.

”apply creative and critical thinking skills, practice creative thinking methodologies” (Outcome 5)
These are served through the demonstration of problem solving thinking in class and their application in homework.

Effective Communication. (Outcome 9)
In homework and in tests, precise, concise communication is essential. Essay writing is not included in this course.

10. Person(s) who prepared this description and date of preparation

Prepared by : T. E. Fischer Date : June 2, 2003
E 355: Engineering Economics
1. Department, number and title of course
Systems Engineering and Engineering Management,
E 355 Engineering Economics (3-3-4)

2. Designation as a Required or Elective Course
E 355 is a required course for all engineering majors, regardless of discipline

3. Course Catalog description
This course covers the basics of cost accounting and cost estimation, cost estimating techniques for engineering projects, quantitative techniques for forecasting costs, cost of quality. Basic engineering economics, including capital investment in tangible and intangible assets. Engineering project management techniques, including budget development, sensitivity analysis, risk, and uncertainty analysis and total quality management concepts.

4. Pre-requisite(s)
E121, E122, E231 and E232

5. Textbook(s) and/or other required material
The Selection Process for Capital Projects by Hans J. Lang and Donald N. Merino
John Wiley and Sons, ISBN no.: 0-471-63425-5 (hard cover)
OR John Wiley and Sons ISBN no.: 0-471-27816-5 (soft cover)
AND SEED® Manual and Software: Donald N. Merino, available via compact disc and WebCT

6. Topics Covered

LECTURE SCHEDULE/TOPI-C
Lecture
NumberDateTOPI-CREFERENCES
11/21
TuesdayIntroduction
Chapter 1
21/23
ThursdayCash Flow Patterns, Rates of Return
Equivalence RelationshipsChapter 3, Chapter 5
Chapter 6
31/27
MondayThe Three Worths
Capitalized Cost and Capital RecoveryChapter 7
Chapter 8
42/3
MondayThe Internal Rate of Return
Benefit Cost AnalysisChapter 9
Chapter 11
52/10
MondayRanking for Technological Exclusivity
Ranking for Financial Exclusivity, MARR
Equivalent Rates of Return and InflationChapter 12
Chapters 13, 14
Chapter 18
62/19
Wednesd.
Depreciation and After-tax Analysis
Chapter 1672/24Senior Design using SEEDChapter 16/SEED83/3SEED inputs/outputsSEED93/17 Retirement and ReplacementsChapter 15
10
3/31Estimation
Sensitivity Analysis
Senior Design Model
Chapters 20-21
11
4/7Probability: Part l
Probability Part II
Simulation
Chapters 22-25
12
4/14Introduction to Multi-Attribute Analysis
Multi-Attribute Analysis TechniqueChapter 26
Chapter 27
13
4/28
Course Review 
All of the Above
7. Class/laboratory schedule (i.e. Number of sessions, duration of sessions)
Lectures – Mondays 1:00 – 2:15 pm – Kidde 228
Recitations – Tuesdays 8:00am - 9:15pm— Kidde 228
Laboratories – Day dependant on section – 3 hours in duration – K 350

8. Contribution of course to meeting the professional component
Contributes to “Engineering Topics” with 30% Engineering Science and 70% Engineering Design

9. Relationship of Course Objectives to Program Outcomes
Outcome 5
In this course and in their senior design the students will be able to develop and assess alternative system designs with respect to the product, function or service of the system in terms of customer requirements costs and engineering performance criteria:
In this course and in their senior designs the students will be able to provide summaries of technical details that meet the needs of financial planners and venture capitalists:
In this course and in their senior design the students will be able to conduct preliminary designs with cost and benefit estimates and identify components which generally contribute to the system costs:
In this course and in their senior design the students will be able to develop an integrated engineering economic analysis:

Outcome 13
In this course and in their senior design the students will be able to understand the fundamentals of a typical business plan for hi-technology new businesses:
In this course and in their senior designs the student will be able to identify and define the economics and finance required for typical new ventures/businesses:
In this course and in their senior design the students will be able to identify typical techniques such as after tax analysis, figures of merit, income statement, balance sheet, break even analysis and other techniques used to justify hi-tech ventures related to their technologies.
In this course and in their senior design the students will be able to understand how the capital markets are a source of funds for new ventures /capitalists:

This is a required core course for all engineering students in engineering education and covers all the material contained in the Fundamentals of Engineering (FE) and Professional Engineering (PE) licensing exams.

10. Person who prepared the description/ date of Preparation
Prepared by Donald N. Merino, Ph.D., P.E., Professor of Engineering Management, Spring, 2003

E 421: Engineering Economic Design
1. Department, number and title of course
Systems Engineering and Engineering Management,
E 421 – Engineering Economic Design

2. Designation as a Required or Elective Course
E 421 is a required course for all engineering majors, regardless of discipline

3. Course Catalog description
This course continues the engineering economic analysis and professional practice thread. This course is linked to the senior capstone design courses and provides for the development of economic analysis and project management, among others. Issues related to marketing of products will be addressed.

4. Pre-requisite(s)
E355 – Engineering Economics and E321 – Engineering Design V

5. Textbook(s) and/or other required material
The Selection Process for Capital Projects by Hans J. Lang and Donald N. Merino
John Wiley and Sons, ISBN no.: 0-471-63425-5

Tools and Tactics of Design by Dominick, Demel, Lawbaugh, Freuler, Kinzel and Fromm, John Wiley and Sons, ISBN no. 0-471-38648-0

SEED® Manual and Software: Donald N. Merino, available via compact disc and WebCT

6. Topics Covered
1.After Tax Analysis and cash flows
2.Sensitivity Analysis
3.Break-even Analysis
4.Income Statements
5.Balance Sheet and debt equity ratios

7. Class/laboratory schedule (i.e. Number of sessions, duration of sessions)
Lectures – Thursdays 9:00 – 10:50 am – Kidde 390
Meetings & Presentations – Thursdays 9:00am - 1:00pm— Kidde 390

8. Contribution of course to meeting the professional component

Contributes to “Engineering Topics”

9. Relationship of Course to Program Outcomes
Outcome 3
In this course and in their senior design the students will gain an ability to use the relevant computer-based and information technology-based tools necessary for engineering practice such as tools for searching and making use of Web-based resources.
Outcome 5
In this course and in their senior design the students will be able to develop and assess alternative system designs with respect to the product, function or service of the system in terms of customer requirements costs and engineering performance criteria:
In this course and in their senior designs the students will be able to provide summaries of technical details that meet the needs of financial planners and venture capitalist:
In this course and in their senior design the students will be able to conduct preliminary designs with cost and benefit estimates and identify components which generally contribute to the system costs:
In this course and in their senior design the students will be able to develop an integrated engineering economic analysis:
In this course and in their senior design the students will be able to develop and assess alternative system designs based on technical and non-technical criteria. Students will be able to be conversant with the creation and protection of intellectual property.
Outcome 10
The students will demonstrate a critical understanding of ethical and moral systems in a social context. The students will understand the rules of professional practice and develop a personal style of effective communication.
Outcome 13
In this course and in their senior design the students will be able to understand the fundamentals of a typical business plan for hi-technology new businesses:
In this course and in their senior designs the student will be able to understand the fundamentals of marketing and determining customer demand for a hi-tech new venture/business and to identify and apply methods to determine customer demand:
In this course and in their senior designs the student will be able to identify typical techniques such as quality function deployment and other market research techniques used to justify hi-tech ventures related to their technology:
In this course and in their senior designs the student will be able to understand the fundamentals of engineering and business economics for high technology new ventures / businesses and identify and define the economics and finance required:
In this course and in their senior design the students will be able to identify typical techniques such as after tax analysis, figures of merit, income statement, balance sheet as well as break even analysis and other techniques used to justify hi-tech ventures related to their technologies.
In this course and in their senior design the students will be able to understand how the capital markets are a source of funds for new ventures /capitalists:

10. Person who prepared the description/ date of Preparation
Prepared by Kate Abel, Spring 2003.


I-C Faculty Curriculum Vitae

Francis Boesch
1. Name and Academic Rank
Boesch, Francis T., Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering
2. Degrees with fields, institution, and date
Bachelor of Science, Electrical Engineering, Polytechnic University, 1957
Master of Science, Electrical Engineering, Polytechnic University, 1960
Ph.D, Electrical Engineering, Polytechnic University, 1963.
3. Number of years of service on this faculty, including date of original appointment and dates of advancement in rank
Number: 24 years Professor, 1979
4. Other related experience--teaching, industrial, etc.
Academic Experience
Polytechnic University (1959-1963 )
University of California at Berkeley (1968-1969 )
Pratt Institute ( 1960 )
Areas of Active Research
Network Reliability and Graph Theory
Courses Taught (recent)
EE 250 Math for Electrical Engineers EE 602 Analytical Methods
E 246 Electronics & Instrumentation EE 603 Linear Systems Theory
Industrial Experience
AT&T Bell Laboratories (1958-1959, 1963-1968, 1969-1979)
W. L. Maxson Corp. (1957-1958)
5. Consulting, patents, etc.
Patent on the touch tone telephone receiver
Consultant to: AT&T Long Lines, Bell Telephone Laboratories, United States Army-Picatinny Arsenal, White House (Office of Emergency Preparedness, NJ State Board of Professional Engineers, Lucent Technologies
6. State(s) in which registered (none)
7. Principal publications of last five years
Boesch, Gross, and Suffel, “Component Order Connectivity “, Congressus Numerantium 131, 1998,pp 145-155.
Boesch, Gross, and Suffel, “ Component Order Connectivity - A Graph Invariant related to Operating Component Reliability ", Combinatorics. Graph Theory, and Algorithms Vol. I, (Eds. Alavi, Lick, & Schwenk) New Issues Press, pp109-116, 1998 ( invited ).
Boesch, Gross, Kazmierczak, Stiles, and Suffel, “ On Extensions of Turan’s Theorem ", Graph Theory Notes of NewYork Academy of Sciences XL, pp 42-45, 2001( invited ).
Boesch, Satyanarayana, and Suffel, “ A Survey of Some Network Reliability Analysis and Synthesis Results “ Chaper 5 in Applications of Graph Theory, ( Ed. L. Beineke), Wiley, 2001 ( invited – to appear)
Boesch and Suffel, “ Degree Sequences - Analysis and Synthesis” Discrete Mathematics, ( invited – to appear).
8. Scientific and professional societies of which a member
New York Academy Sciences, IEEE, Eta Kappa Nu, Sigma Xi
9. Honors and awards
Fellow IEEE
Fellow New York Academy of Sciences
Distinguished Alumnus Award (Polytechnic University)
Davis Research Award (Stevens)
Honorary Master’s Degree (Stevens)
Morton Distinguished Teaching Award (Stevens)
Distinguished Service Award (Stevens)
10. Institutional and professional service in the last five years
Institutional Service
Faculty advisor to ( and founder of Stevens chapter) Eta Kappa Nu
School of Engineering Curriculum Committee
Assessment Committee
Graduate school Committee on 3 credits
Committee on Committees of School of Engineering
Member of Department P&T committee
Director of Department EE Graduate Program
Member of Department PhD Qualifying Examination committee
Member of Department Transfer Credit committee
Member of Department Technogenesis committee
Chair Department Director Search Committee
Co-Director Hazeltine Day
Professional Service
Editor-in-Chief and founder of the journal Networks, published by Wiley
Editor, Journal Graph Theory, published by Wiley.
Secretary of the New Technology and Scientific Activities Committee of IEEE
Member of IEEE Circuits and Systems Society Committee on Large-Scale Networks
Member IEEE Fortescue Fellowship Committee
Member IEEE Circuits and Systems Society Technical Achievement Award
Committee
Member IEEE VanValkenberg Award Committee
11. Professional development activities in the last five years
Various conferences as a participant and as a presenter.
R. Chandramouli
1. Name and Academic Rank
R. Chandramouli, Assistant Professor
2. Degrees with fields, institution, and date
Bachelor of Science, Mathematics, University of Madras, 1990
Master of Engineering, Electrical Communication Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, 1994
Ph.D., Computer Science and Engineering, University of South Florida, 1999
3. Number of years of service on this faculty, including date of original appointment and dates of advancement in rank
Number: 4 years Assistant Professor, 1999.
4. Other related experience--teaching, industrial, etc.
Areas of Active Research
Low power wireless networking, wireless security, multimedia security, applied probability theory.
Courses Taught:
Graduate Courses:
EE 609: Communication Theory I, Fall semesters.
EE 606: Probability and Stochastic Process II, Spring semesters.
CpE/NIS/WS 592:Computer and Multimedia Network Security, Fall and Spring semesters.
Undergraduate Courses:
CPE 493A: Data and Computer , Fall semesters.
CpE 491: Information Systems II, Spring semesters.
Other Teaching Related Activities:
Lecture on “Modulation techniques for satellite communications” at Loral Skynet, NJ.
Industrial Experience
5. Consulting, patents, etc.
6. State(s) in which registered
7. Principal publications of last five years
Selected five publications:
R.Chandramouli, "Security and Insecurity of Wireless Networks, " Chapter in Guarding Your Business: An Architecture for Security, M. Malek, S. Ghosh, and E. Storh (Eds.), Kluwer, 2003.
R. Chandramouli and K. Ramachandran, "Wavelets for statistical estimation and detection," Chapter in Wavelets for Signal Processing, L. Debnath (Ed.), Birkhauser, 2003.
R. Chandramouli, N.D.Memon, and M. Rabbani, "Digital watermarking," Chapter in Encyclopedia of Imaging Science and Technology, Wiley, 2002.
R.Chandramouli and N.D. Memon, "On sequential watermark detection." To appear in IEEE Transactions on Signal Processing, Special Issue on Signal Processing for Data Hiding in Digital Media and Secure Content Delivery, 2003.
R. Chandramouli, "A mathematical framework for steganalysis." To appear in ACM Multimedia Systems, Special issue on multimedia security, 2003.
8. Scientific and professional societies of which a member
Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineer Inc. (IEEE).
9. Honors and awards
University of S. Florida Graduate Council’s Outstanding Dissertation Prize.
IEEE Richard E. Merwin Award.
NSF CAREER Award.
10. Institutional and professional service in the last five years
Institutional Service
1. Advisory board member, Executive Leadership Institute.
2. Co-director, Multimedia Technology Web Campus Program.
3. Member, CpE Graduate Admissions Committee (2000 - Present).
Professional Service
Technical Program Committee Member:
IEEE International Conference on Communications, 2002, 2003; IEEE VTC 2003, NSF Panel reviewer, among others.
Technical Program Chair, Multimedia Technology Track, IEEE International Conference on Information Technology: Research and Education, 2003
Organizer/Chair: Several special sessions and regular sessions in international conferences.
Professional Talks (other than conference presentations):
Intercepting covert communications on the Internet, Workshop on Homeland and Cyber Security, NJ, 2003.
Wireless Networking for Financial Services:State-of-the-Art and Future Challenges, Guest Speaker, Wall Street Technology Association Seminar Series, "Wireless", NY, Aug. 2001.
Information theoretic analysis of watermarking, Digimarc Corporation, 2000.
Two problems in high level power estimation and their soultions, Colloquium speaker, Department of Computer Science and Engg., Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Dec. 1999.
A semi-drunk's walk and its applications, Colloquium speaker, Department of Computer Science, Polytechnic University, Brooklyn, Nov. 1999
11. Professional development activities in the last five years
Conferences and Workshops Attended:
Attended several conferences and workshops.
Sumit Ghosh
1. Name and Academic Rank
Sumit Ghosh, Hattrick Chair Professor
2. Degrees with fields, institution, and date
Bachelor of Technology, Electrical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur, 1980
Master of Science, Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, 1982
Ph.D., Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, 1985
3. Number of years of service on this faculty, including date of original appointment and dates of advancement in rank
Number: 1
4. Other related experience--teaching, industrial, etc.
Areas of Active Research
Network security, networking, hardware description language, modeling and simulation, asynchronous distributed algorithms, synthetic creativity, programming languages.
Courses Taught
CpE 360 (Computational Data Structures and Algorithms)
CpE 345 (Modeling and Simulation)
CpE 691 (Information Systems Security)
Industrial Experience
Consultant, Silvar-Lisco, 1981-1983
Member of Technical Staff, Fairchild R&D, 1983-1985
Member of Technical Staff, Bell Labs, 1985-1989
5. Consulting, patents, etc.
Army Research Lab., Honeywell Inc., Scientific Systems Inc., US Air Force Labs.
6. State(s) in which registered: (none)
7. Principal publications of last five years
Sumit Ghosh, “P2EDAS: Asynchronous, Distributed Event Driven Simulation Algorithm with Inconsistent Event Preemption for Accurate Execution of VHDL Descriptions on Parallel Processors,” IEEE Transactions on Computers, Vol. 50, No. 1, January 2001, pp 28-50. Jan/Feb 2001
Sumit Ghosh, “The Role of Modeling and Asynchronous, Distributed Simulation in Analyzing Complex Systems of the Future,” Information Systems Frontiers, Vol. 4, No. 2, July 2002, pp. 161-177, Kluwer Publishers.
Tony Lee and Sumit Ghosh, “Stability of RYNSORD, a Decentralized Algorithm for Railway Networks, Under Perturbations,” Journal of Rail and Rapid Transport, Vol. 214, No. F4, Part F, November 2000, pp. 201-222.
Sumit Ghosh, “Understanding Complex, Real-World Systems through Asynchronous, Distributed Decision-Making Algorithms,” The Journal of Systems and Software, Vol. 58, No. 2, September 1, 2001, pp. 153-167.
Norbert Giambiasi, Bruno Escude, and Sumit Ghosh, “GDEVS: A Generalized Discrete Event Specification for Accurate Modeling of Dynamic Systems,” Transactions of the Society for Computer Simulation (SCS) International, Vol. 17, No. 3, September 2000, pp. 120-134, San Diego, CA.
Sumit Ghosh, “A New Qualitative Metric for Assessing Advanced Graduate Courses in Computer Engineering & Science,” IEEE Circuits & Devices, Vol. 16, No. 6, November 2000, pp. 11-20.
Peter Heck and Sumit Ghosh, “A Study of Synthetic Creativity through Behavior Modeling and Simulation of an Ant Colony,” IEEE Intelligent Systems, Vol. 15, No. 6, November/December 2000, pp. 58-66.
Bruno Escude, Norbert Giambiasi, and Sumit Ghosh, “Coupled Modeling in Generalized Discrete Event Specifications (GDEVS),” SCS Transactions on Simulation special issue on Recent Advances in DEVS Methodology, Vol. 18, No. 4, December 2001, pp.
Peter Heck and Sumit Ghosh, “The Design and Role of Synthetic Creative Traits in Artificial Ant Colonies,” Journal of Intelligent & Robotic Systems, Vol. 33, No. 4, April 2002, pp. 343-370.
8. Scientific and professional societies of which a member
IEEE
Society for Modeling and Simulation International, Associate Vice President
9. Honors and awards
Senior member of IEEE
10. Institutional and professional service in the last five years
Institutional Service
Institute Retreat committee, Stevens
Professional Service
Associate Editor, IEEE Transactions on SMC
Associate Editor, Transactions of Simulation
11. Professional development activities in the last five years
NSF workshop on the Modeling and Simulation of Ultra-Large Networks: Challenges and New Research Directions, Sheraton, Tucson, Nov 18-20, 2001
Publications in education-related journals and conferences.
Sumit Ghosh, "An Exercise in Inducing Creativity in Undergraduate Engineering Students through Challenging Examinations and Open-Ended Design Problems," IEEE Transactions on Education, Vol. 36, No. 1, February 1993, pp. 113-119.
Raymond Kuo and Sumit Ghosh, "Analysis of the Admissions Criteria into the Engineering Program at an Ivy LeagueSchool," College & University, Vol. 73, No. 2, Fall 1997, pp. 2-12.
Sumit Ghosh, "Experiences with Undergraduate Honors Theses in a Computer Engineering Program," Proceedings of the 1998 ASEE/IEEE/IEEE-CS Frontiers in Education Conference (FIE 98), pp. 322-327, Tempe, AZ, Nov 4-7, 1998.
Harry Heffes
1. Name and Academic Rank
Harry Heffes, Professor
2. Degrees with fields, institution, and date
Bachelor of Electrical Engineering, CCNY, 1962
Master of Electrical Engineering, New York University, 1964
Ph.D., Electrical Engineering, New York University, 1968
3. Number of years of service on this faculty, including date of original appointment and dates of advancement in rank
Number: 13 years. Professor, 1990
4. Other related experience--teaching, industrial, etc.
Areas of Active Research
Modeling, Performance Analysis and Overload Control of Teletraffic Systems
Courses Taught
System Theory, Queuing Theory, Probability and Stochastic Processes, Analytic Methods, Circuits and Systems, Principles of Traffic Engineering and Performance Analysis
Industrial Experience
Bell Laboratories, 1962 to 1989

5. Consulting, patents, etc. (none)
6. State(s) in which registered
7. Principal publications of last five years
E. S. El-Alfy, and Y. D. Yao and H. Heffes, "A model-based Q-learning scheme for wireless channel allocation with prioritized handoff," Global Telecommunications Conference, 2001. GLOBECOM '01. IEEE, Volume: 6, 2001.
M. Choi, Y. D. Yao, and H. Heffes, "Performance Analysis of NAK-based ARQ in Markovian Error Channels" IEEE Vehicular. Technology. Conf. (VTC), Atlantic City, Oct. 2001.
L. Zhou, Y. D. Yao, and H. Heffes, "Performance Analysis of CPCH-Type Packet Channels for Variable-Bit-Rate Applications" IEEE Vehicular Technology Conf. (VTC), Atlantic City, Oct. 2001.
E. S. El-Alfy, Y. D. Yao, and H. Heffes, "Adaptive Resource Allocation with Prioritized Handoff in Cellular Mobile Networks under QoS Provisioning" IEEE Vehicular. Technology. Conf. (VTC), Atlantic City, Oct. 2001.
E. S. El-Alfy, Y. D. Yao, and H. Heffes, "Autonomous Call Admission Control with Prioritized Handoff in Cellular Networks," IEEE Int. Conf. Communications. (I-CC), Finland, June 2001.
M. Choi, Y. D. Yao, and H. Heffes, "Throughput Analysis of a Class of Selective Repeat ARQ with Multi-Copy Retransmissions," IEEE Vehicular. Technology. Conf. (VTC), Greece, May 2001.
E. S. El-Alfy, Y. D. Yao, and H. Heffes, "A Learning Approach for Call Admission Control with Prioritized Handoff in Mobile Multimedia Networks," IEEE Vehicular. Technology. Conf. (VTC), Greece, May 2001.
K. Ryan, H. Heffes "Analysis of a Class of Overload Control Schemes for Mobile Communication System", Proceedings of the Applied Telecommunications Symposium, April 1998, Boston, pp. 47-56
8. Scientific and professional societies of which a member
IEEE - Fellow
9. Honors and awards
Bell Labs Distinguished Technical Staff Award, 1983
IEEE Communication Society's S.O. Rice Prize, 1986.
IEEE FELLOW, 1990
10. Institutional and professional service in the last five years
Institutional Service
Telecommunication Management Curriculum Committee, EE Ph.D. Qualifying Exam Committee Chairman
Professional Service
11. Professional development activities in the last five years
Hongbin Li
1. Name and Academic Rank
Hongbin Li, Assistant Professor
2. Degrees with fields, institution, and date
Bachelor of Science, Electrical Engineering, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, 1991
Master of Engineering, Electrical Engineering, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, 1994
Ph.D., Electrical Engineering, University of Florida, 1999
3. Number of years of service on this faculty, including date of original appointment and dates of advancement in rank
Service, 4 years Assistant Professor, 1999
4. Other related experience--teaching, industrial, etc.
Areas of Active Research
Statistical signal processing, wireless communications, and radars
Courses Taught
EE448 Digital Signal Processing
EE465 Introduction to Communication Systems
EE606 Probability and Random Processes II
EE616 Signal Detection and Estimation in Communications
EE663 Digital Signal Processing
Industrial Experience
System Engineer, Jinfan Multimedia, Co., China, 9/1995 – 12/1995
5. Consulting, patents, etc. (none)
6. State(s) in which registered (none)
7. Principal publications of last five years
23 refereed journal papers and 44 referred conference papers. A selected list is the following:
Hongbin Li and Jian Li, "Differential and coherent decorrelating multiuser receivers for space-time-coded CDMA systems," IEEE Transactions on Signal Processing, Special Issue on Signal Processing for Communications, vol.50, no.5, pp. 2529-2537, October 2002.
Hongbin Li, Jian Li, and Scott L. Miller, "Decoupled multiuser code-timing estimation for code-division multiple-access communication systems," IEEE Transactions on Communications, vol. 49, no. 8, pp.1425-1436, August 2001.
Petre Stoica, Hongbin Li, and Jian Li, "Amplitude estimation of sinusoidal signals: survey, new results, and an application," IEEE Transactions on Signal Processing, vol. 48, no.2, pp. 338-352, February 2000.
Hongbin Li, Petre Stoica, and Jian Li, "Computationally efficient maximum likelihood estimation of structured covariance matrices," IEEE Transactions on Signal Processing, vol. 47, no. 5, pp. 1314-1323, May 1999.
Zheng-She Liu, Hongbin Li, and Jian Li, "Efficient implementation of Capon and APES for spectral estimation," IEEE Transactions on Aerospace and Electronic Systems, vol. 34, no. 4, pp. 1314-1319, October 1998.
8. Scientific and professional societies of which a member
Member of IEEE: Communications, Information Theory, and Signal Processing Societies
Member of Tau Beta Pi
Member of Phi Kappa Phi
9. Honors and awards
Jess H. Davis Memorial Award for excellence in research, Stevens Institute of Technology, 2001.
Sigma Xi Graduate Research Award, University of Florida, 1999.
10. Institutional and professional service in the last five years
Institutional Service
Served on the Undergraduate Academic Standards Committee, Infrastructures, Training, and Service Committee, School of Engineering Assessment Committee, Graduate Student Admission Committee, Graduate Curriculum Committee, EE Program Committee, EE Ph.D. Qualify Exams Committee.
Professional Service
Editor for IEEE Transactions on Wireless Communications
Reviewers for various journals, conferences, book publishers, and funding agencies.
Session chairs for various domestic and international conferences
11. Professional development activities in the last five years
Development of an On-line DSP Certificate Program, 2003
Development of a new graduate course EE616--Signal Detection and Estimation in Communications. Updating of two undergraduate courses EE448 Digital Signal Processing and EE465 Introductions to Communication Systems, 2001
Development and update of project-based learning components for EE448 Digital Signal Processing and EE465 Introduction to Communication Systems, 2000 to 2003
Hong Man
1. Name and Academic Rank
Hong Man, Assistant Professor
2. Degrees with fields, institution, and date
Bachelor of Science, Electronics Engineering, Suzhou University (PRC), 1988
Master of Science, Electrical Engineering, Gonzaga University, 1994
Ph.D., Electrical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, 1999
3. Number of years of service on this faculty, including date of original appointment and dates of advancement in rank
Service, 3 years Assistant Professor, 2000
4. Other related experience--teaching, industrial, etc.
Areas of Active Research
Image Processing: image/video coding, image analysis, image/video indexing and retrieval, medical imaging
Data networking: wireless ad hoc networks, QoS routing, cross layer optimization
Courses Taught
Undergraduate:
CpE462 Introduction to Image Processing and Coding
CpE490 Information System Engineering I
Also involved in
CpE/EE 440 Current Topics in EE and CPE
CpE485/486 Research in CPE I and II
CpE423/424 Engineering Design VII and VIII
Graduate:
CpE/EE/NIS645 Image Processing and Computer Vision
CpE/EE/CS Integrated Service – Multimedia
EE611 Digital Communication Engineering I
Industrial Experience
5. Consulting, patents, etc.
Consulting:
Digital Angel.Net, Corp. 2001
EG Technology, Inc. 2002
Patents: (None)
6. State(s) in which registered (none)
7. Principal publications of last five years
Journal
H. Man, A. Docef and F. Kossentini, “Performance Analysis of the JPEG 2000 Image Coding Standard”, Multimedia Tools and Applications, special issue on Image and Video Coding Techniques, Kluwer Academic Publishers, 2002 (to appear).
H. Man, R. de Queiroz and M. J. T. Smith, “3-D Subband Coding Techniques for Wireless Video Communications”, IEEE Trans. on Circuits and Systems for Video Technology, Vol. 12, No. 6, pp. 386-397, June 2002.
H. Man, F. Kossentini and M. J. T. Smith, “A Family of Efficient and Channel Error Resilient Wavelet/Subband Image Coders”, IEEE Trans. on Circuits and Systems for Video Technology, Vol. 9, No. 1, pp.95-108, Feb. 1999.
Conference
H. Man and M. J. T. Smith, “Lapped Transform for 3D Video Coding” (invited paper), 2003 SPIE Conference on Visual Communications and Image Processing (VCIP’03), (Lugano, Switzerland), July 2003 (to appear).
H. Man and Y. Li, “Multi-Stream Video Transport over MPLS Networks”, 2002 IEEE Workshop on Multimedia and Signal Processing (MMSP’02), (St. Thomas, USVI), Dec. 2002
H. Man and Y. Li, “Layered Video Streams over Ad Hoc Campus Network”, the 5th IEEE DSP Workshop (DSP’02), (Atlanta, GA), Oct. 2002.
D. Sun and H. Man, “Evaluation of Reliable Data Transport Schemes for Mobile Ad Hoc Networks”(invited paper), 6th World Multiconference on Systemics, Cybernetics and Informatics (SCI 2002), (Orlando, FL), July 2002
H. Man, R. de Queiroz and M. J. T. Smith, “A New 3-D Subband Video Coding Technique”, IEEE International Conference on Acoustics Speech and Signal Processing (Orlando, FL), May. 2002.
D. Sun and H. Man, “ENI-C - An Improved Reliable Transport Scheme for Mobile Ad Hoc Networks”, IEEE GLOBECOM Conference 2001 (San Antonio, TX), Nov. 2001.
8. Scientific and professional societies of which a member
The Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineering
The Institute of Electronics, Information and Communication Engineering
9. Honors and awards
10. Institutional and professional service in the last five years
Institutional Service
Computer Engineering Program
Computer Engineering Graduate Admission
School of Engineering, Engineering Education and Assessment Committee
Professional Service
NSF ITR SPS 2003 Panel
Member of Technical Committee, IEEE SPS education committee, 2003-2005
Member of Organizing Committee/ Finance Chair, IEEE 2002 International Workshop on Multimedia Signal Processing (MMSP’02).
Secretary, Signal Processing Chapter, IEEE North Jersey Section.
11. Professional development activities in the last five years

Bruce McNair
1. Name and Academic Rank
Bruce McNair, Distinguished Service Professor
2. Degrees with fields, institution, and date
Bachelor of Engineering (with Honor), Stevens Institute of Technology, 1971
Master of Engineering, Electrical Engineering, Stevens Institute of Technology, 1974
3. Number of years of service on this faculty, including date of original appointment and dates of advancement in rank
Service, 1 year Distinguished Service Professor, 2002
4. Other related experience--teaching, industrial, etc.
Areas of Active Research
Wireless Communications
Signal Processing Platforms
System Security
Encryption
Courses Taught
Graduate courses
NIS/CpE691: Information Systems Security
Undergraduate courses at Stevens:
EE/CpE345: Modeling and Simulation
EE/CpE415-416/423/424: Design VII, Design VIII
EE440 Selected Topics in Electrical Engineering (guest lecture)
Continuing education short courses (1982 - present) at various locations (university and companies) in areas related to communications.
Industrial Experience
AT&T Labs – Research: 1996 – 2002. Research in 4G high-mobility wireless networks; speed, range and mobility extensions to wireless LANs
AT&T Bell Labs: 1978 – 1996. Research, development and systems engineering in public data networks, high-speed analog modems, secure voice terminals, speaker verification systems, network security, and extensions to existing cellular standards.
US Army Communications R&D Command: 1971 – 1973, 1974 – 1978. VHF-FM tactical radio systems, secure communications.
ITT Defense Communications Division: 1973. Hardware design, system simulation of satellite communications terminals, low bit-rate speech communications systems.
5. Consulting, patents, etc.
Patents
14 U.S. patents granted (6 more pending) in areas such as data transmission, cryptographic techniques, speech processing, video processing, security systems, user authentication, fraud control, synchronization, dynamic channel assignment, location determination techniques, etc.
Consulting
Expert witness/consulting for patent attorneys in geolocation technology, software, wireless data networking.
6. State(s) in which registered (none).
7. Principal publications of last five years
Chuang, J., Cimini, L., Li, G., Lin, L., McNair, B., Sollenberger, N., Suzuki, M., Zhao, H., "High Speed wireless data access based on combining EDGE with wideband OFDM," IEEE Communication Magazine, November, 1999.
Cimini, L., Leung, K., McNair, B., Winters, J. "Outdoor IEEE 802.11b Cellular Networks: MAC Protocol Design and Performance," Proc. I-CC 2002, New York, NY, April 2002
Clark, M., Leung, K., McNair, B., Kostic, Z., "Outdoor IEEE 802.11b Cellular Networks: Radio Link Performance", Proc. I-CC 2002, New York, NY, April 2002.
McNair, B., “Software Radio – the Commercial Perspective,” Proc. IEEE Sarnoff Symposium, Princeton, NJ, March 2002.
Zou, H., Daneshard, B., McNair, B., "An Integrated OFDM Receiver for High-Speed Mobile Data Communications," Proc. IEEE Globecom 2001, San Antonio, TX, Oct. 2001.
Cimini, L., McNair, B, Sollenberger, N., "Implementation of an Experimental 384 kb/s Radio Link for High-Speed Internet Access," Proc. IEEE Vehicular Technology Conference VTC2000, Boston, MA, September, 2000.
Cimini, L., McNair, B, Sollenberger, N., "Performance of an Experimental 384 kb/s 1900 MHz Radio Link In a Wide-Area High-Mobility Environment," Proc. IEEE Vehicular Technology Conference VTC2000, Boston, MA, September, 2000.
8. Scientific and professional societies of which a member
IEEE, Senior Member
9. Honors and awards
AT&T Bell Labs Architecture Area Affirmative Action Award
AT&T Business Communication Services patent awards (5)
10. Institutional and professional service in the last five years
Institutional Service
Professional Service
Mentoring summer students (~8) and regular employees (numerous) at AT&T Labs, mentoring female and minority undergraduate and graduate students through MentorNet (4), mentoring AT&T Labs Fellowship Program students (2)
11. Professional development activities in the last five years
Active participation in IEEE Vehicular Technology Society conferences, learning new software tools

Emil Neu
1. Name and Academic Rank
Emil C. Neu , Professor Emeritus of Electrical and Computer Engineering
2. Degrees with fields. institution, and date
D.Eng.Sc. - Electrical Engineering, Newark College of Engineering, 1966
M.S. - Electrical Engineering, Stevens Institute of Technology, 1957
M.E. - General Engineering, Stevens Institute of Technology, 1955
3 Number of years of service on this faculty, including date of original appointment and dates of advancement in rank
46 years of service
Dates of advancement
Original appointment: 9/1/57
Instructor of Electrical Engineering - Stevens Institute of Technology, 1957 - 1962
Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering - Stevens Institute of Technology, 1962 - 1971
Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering - Stevens Institute of Technology, 1971 - 1984
Professor of Computer Science - Stevens Institute of Technology, 1984 - 1993
Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science - Stevens Institute of Technology, 1993 - 1996
Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering - Stevens Institute of Technology, 1996 - 1998
Professor Emeritus of Electrical and Computer Engineering - Stevens Institute of Technology, 1998 - present
4. Other related experience – teaching industrial, etc.
Graduate Assistant in Electrical Engineering - Stevens Institute of Technology, 1955 - 1957
Electronics Engineer - ITT Federal Laboratories, Summers of 1955 and 1956

Off-Campus Teaching
ITT (graduate course) 1999
GEC-Marconi (graduate courses) 1991, 1993-1995
Bell Communications Research (graduate courses) 1989 - 1990
AT&T (graduate course) 1988
Singer-Kearfott (graduate courses) 1983 - 1988
ITT (graduate courses) 1962-1964, 1984 - 1985
Bristol-Myers (undergraduate courses) 1969 - 1970

5. Consulting, patients, etc. (none)
6. State(s) in which registered
E.I.T. NJ
7. Principal publications of last five years
E. C. Neu, "Student Ownership of Personal Computers,” Proceedings of the 1998 ASEE Annual Conference, June 1998, Session 2520.
E. C. Neu, "Lectures: Laptop Computers and the Internet, "Proceedings of the 25th Annual Conference of the IEEE Industrial Electronics Society, December 1999, Session ETSS4 (Invited Paper).
8. Scientific and professional societies of which a member
Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers - Life Senior Member
American Society for Engineering Education
Eta Kappa Nu
Sigma Xi
9. Honors and Awards
Charles V. Schafer, Jr. School of Engineering Award
10. Institutional and professional service in the last five years (none)
11. Professional development activities in the last five years
Conferences Attended
1998 ASEE Annual Conference
1999 25th Annual Conference of the IEEE Industrial Electronics Society

K.P. Subbalakshmi
1. Name and Academic Rank
K.P. Subbalakshmi, Assistant Professor
2. Degrees with fields. institution, and date
Bachelor of Science, Physics, University of Madras, 1990
Master of Engineering, Electrical Communication Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, 1994
Ph.D., Engineering Science, Simon Fraser University, 2000
3. Number of years of service on this faculty, including date of original appointment and dates of advancement in rank
Service: 2.5 years Assistant Professor, 2000.
4. Other related experience--teaching, industrial, etc.
Areas of Active Research
Information security (steganography, watermarking, joint encryption and error correction), Multimedia networking (scheduling and QoS issues), Distributed source coding for sensor networks, Joint source-channel coding, Multiple description coding.
Courses Taught:
Graduate Courses:
EE 610: Error Control Coding for Networks, Spring 2003, 2002, 2001.
EE 612: Principles of Multimedia Compression Fall 2001, 2000.
NIS/CpE 591: Introduction to Multimedia Networking, Fall 2002, 2001.
Undergraduate Courses:
E 245A Circuits and Systems, Spring 2003, Fall 2002, Spring 2002.
CpE 491: Information Systems II, Spring 2001.
Industrial Experience (none)
5. Consulting, patents, etc.
6. State(s) in which registered
7. Representative publications of last five years (16 total)
Siva Somasundaram and K. P. Subbalakshmi ``3-D Multiple Description Video Coding for Packet Switched Networks'' IEEE International Conference on Multimedia and Expo, Baltimore, Maryland, July 2003.
Siva Somasundaram and K.P. Subbalakshmi "Exploiting Path Diversity and Forward Error Correction for Robust Transmission of Images" 23rd Picture Coding Symposium, Saint-Malo, France, April 2003.(invited paper)
Qingyu Chen and K.P. Subbalakshmi "Trellis Decoding for MPEG-4 Streams Over Wireless Channels " IS&T/SPIE Electronic Imaging, Image and Video Communications and Processing, Santa Clara, January 2003.
Siva Somasundaram and K.P. Subbalakshmi "A Novel 3D Scalable Video Compression Algorithm" IS&T/SPIE Electronic Imaging, Image and Video Communications and Processing, Santa Clara, January 2003.
K. P. Subbalakshmi and Siva Somasundaram "Multiple Description Coding Framework for EBCOT" IEEE International Conference on Image Processing, Rochester, New York, September 2002.
K. P. Subbalakshmi and Jacques Vaisey, "On the Joint Source-Channel Decoding of Variable-Length Encoded Sources: The BSC Case ", IEEE Transactions on Communications, Vol 49, pp 2052-2055, December 2001.
8. Scientific and professional societies of which a member
IEEE, SPIE (The International Society for Optical Engineering)
9. Honors and awards
10. Institutional and professional service in the last five years
Institutional Service
Member joint CS/CpE curriculum committee (2002).
Co-chair, Computer Facilities Committee (2000- Present).
Member, Graduate Curriculum Committee (2000 - Present).
Graduate affairs committee member (Institute wide, 2002).
School of Engineering Assessment committee (School wide, 2002).
Professional Service
Technical Program Committee Member:
IEEE International Conference on Communications, Special Session Global Services and Infrastructure for Next Generation Networks, 2003
IEEE International Conference on Information Technology: Research and Education, 2003
Reviewer for:
IEEE (various IEEE journals)
Professional Talks (other than conference presentations):
Joint Source-Channel Coding for Image/Video Communications, Industry-Day, NJIT, Newark, NJ, February, 2002
Joint Source-Channel Coding for Image/Video Communications, Mitsubishi Electric Research Laboratory, Murray Hill, NJ, February, 2002
Alternative Methods for Error Resilient Communications, Department of E.C.E, Stevens Institute of Technology, Hoboken, NJ, October, 2001
11. Professional development activities in the last five years
DIMACS Working Group Meeting on Data Compression in Networks and Applications, March 18 - 20, 2002, DIMACS Center, Rutgers University, Piscataway, New Jersey.
Stuart Tewksbury
1. Name and Academic Rank
Stuart Tewksbury, Full Professor
2. Degrees with fields, institution, and date
Bachelor of Science, Physics, University of Rochester, 1964
Ph.D., Physics, University of Rochester, 1969
3. Number of years of service on this faculty, including date of original appointment and dates of advancement in rank
Service, 5 years Professor, 1998
4. Other related experience--teaching, industrial, etc.
Areas of Active Research
Computational systems, system integration
Courses Taught
Undergraduate Courses
E 225 Circuits & Systems
EE 322 Engineering Design VI
EE 471 Transport Phenomena in Solid State Devices
CpE 322 Engineering Design VI
CpE 360 Software Design & Development
CpE 390 Microprocessor Systems
CpE 487: Digital System Design
Graduate Courses
EE 583 Wireless Systems Overview
EE 586 Physical Design of Wireless Systems
CpE 560 Introduction to Networked Information Systems
Industrial Experience
AT&T Bell Laboratories, 1969-1998
5. Consulting, patents, etc.
Consulting
None over past five years
Patents
Seven patents - feedback coders, solid state devices.
6. State(s) in which registered (none)
7. Repesentative publications of last five years
S.K. Tewksbury, "Architectural Fault Tolerance," chapter in I-C Manufacturability: The Art of Process and Design Integration, P. Gyvez and D. Pradhan (Eds), IEEE Press (1999).
S.K. Tewksbury, "Wafer Scale Integration," chapter in Encyclopedia of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, Prentice Hall (1999).
S.K. Tewksbury, "Application Specific Integrated Circuits (ASI-CS)" chapter in The Electrical Engineering Handbook, CRC Press, R. Dorf (Ed). (1998).
S.K. Tewksbury and L.A. Hornak, "Optical distribution of clock signals in microelectronic systems," Journal of VLSI Signal Processing: Special issue on high performance clock distribution. (Invited paper, 1998).
S.K. Tewksbury, "Challenges facing practical defect and fault tolerance for MEMS," Proc. IEEE 2001 International Symposium on Defect and Fault Tolerance in VLSI Systems, San Francisco, Oct 24-26, 2001.
S.K. Tewksbury and K. Devabattini, "Towards undergraduate education in systems hardware technologies," ASME/IEEE InterPACK'99 Conference, Maui, Hawaii, June 13-19 (1999).
8. Scientific and professional societies of which a member
IEEE, APS, ACM, SPIE, OSA, ASE
9. Honors and awards
AT&T Bell Laboratories: Distinguished Member of Technical Staff (DMTS)
10. Institutional and professional service in the last five years
Institutional Service
Director, Dept. Electrical and Computer Engineering (1998-present).
Various SoE and Institute committees.
Professional Service
Member: IEEE Press Board (2001 - present)
Founder and Senior Editor of IEEE Press Book Series:, Microelectronic Systems Integration: Principles and Practices.
Editorial Board: Journal of Advanced Packaging (1998 - present)
IEEE Press Liaison to the Solid-State Circuits Council (1992 - present).
Member: Signal Processing and Communications Electronics Technical Activities Board of IEEE Communications Society.
Member: IEEE CPMT Committee on Education
Various NSF review panels (ERC, STC, SBIR, etc.)
Book/Article Reviewer: McGraw Hill, Prentice Hall, IEEE others.
11. Professional development activities in the last five years
ABET workshop (2001)
Web-based curriculum development
Ufuk Tureli
1. Name and Academic Rank
Ufuk Tureli, Assistant Professor
2. Degrees with fields, institution, and date
Bachelor of Science, Electrical Engineering, Bogazici University, Turkey, 1994
Master of Science, Electrical Engineering, University of Virginia, 1998
Ph.D., Electrical Engineering, University of Virginia, 2000
3. Number of years of service on this faculty, including date of original appointment and dates of advancement in rank
Service, 3 years Professor, 2000
4. Other related experience--teaching, industrial, etc.
Areas of Active Research
Synchronization and parameter estimation, channel estimation, equalization, transmitter and receiver diversity for wireless communications. Software defined radio and wireless testbed development, experimental validation.
Courses Taught
Undergraduate Courses
EE 245 Electrical Circuits
EE 475 Advanced Communications
EE 359 Electronic Circuits Fall
Graduate Courses
EE605 Probability and Stochastic Processes
EE615 Multicarrier Communications
EE664 Multidimensional Signal Processing
EE670 Information Theory and Coding
EE710 Introduction to Multicarrier Systems
Off-Campus Courses
EE740 Satellite Communications, Spring 2002 (Loral Skynet)
Industrial Experience (none)
5. Consulting, patents, etc. (none)
6. State(s) in which registered (none)
7. Principal publications of last five years
U. Tureli, Didem Kivanc and H. Liu, “Experimental and Analytical Studies on a high resolution OFDM Carrier Estimator,” IEEE Transactions on Vehicular Technology 50(2):629 –643, March 2001.
U. Tureli, H. Liu and M. D. Zoltowski,” OFDM Blind Carrier Estimation: ESPRIT,” IEEE Transactions on Communications, 48(9): 1459 –1461, September 2000.
D. Kivanc, U. Tureli and H. Liu, “Capacity Improvement for Uplink OFDMA, in 36th Asilomar onference on Signals, Systems and Computers,” Asilomar, CA, Nov. 2002
R. Ambati and U. Tureli, “Experimental studies in OFDM carrier frequency offset estimation,” accepted for publication and presentation at IEEE International Conference on Communications (I-CC 2003), Anchorage, Alaska, USA on May 11-15, 2003.
P. Honan and U. Tureli, “Blind and Efficient Sub-Space Based Carrier Offset Estimator for Multi-Antenna OFDM Communications in Correlated Noise,” accepted for publication and presentation at IEEE International Conference on Communications (I-CC 2003), Anchorage, Alaska, USA on May 11-15, 2003.
Z. Cao, U. Tureli and Y.-D. Yao, “Efficient Structure-based Carrier Frequency Offset Estimation for Interleaved OFDMA Uplink,” accepted for publication and presentation at IEEE International Conference on Communications (I-CC 2003), Anchorage, Alaska, USA on May 11-15, 2003
8. Scientific and professional societies of which a member
Member of International Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) Aerospace & Electronic Systems, Circuits and Systems, Communications, Education, Information, Instrumentation and Measurement, Microwave Theory and Vehicular Technology Societies.
9. Honors and awards
University Fellowship at the University of Virginia., 1995-1996 & 1996-1997
Listed under Marquette, “Who’s who in America”
10. Institutional and professional service in the last five years
Institutional Service
Engineering Acceditation ABET 2000 Committee member for the Carl Schaefer School of Engineering, Stevens Institute of Technology. September 2001-present.
Graduate Committee for the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering Department, Stevens Institute of Technology, September 2000-present
Representative Professional Service
Reviewer for IEEE Transactions on Communications, IEEE Transactions on Fuzzy Systems, IEEE Transactions on Signal Processing, IEEE Transactions on Vehicular Technology, Communication Letters, Signal Processing Letters and various international conferences including I-CC, GLOBECOM, VTC.
IEEE Vehicular Technology Conference (VTC), Fall 2001, Organizing Committee and Publications Committee Member, Session Chair.
IEEE Vehicular Technology Conference (VTC), Spring 2002, Technical Committee Member.
IEEE International Conference on Communications (I-CC) 2003, Technical Committee Member, Session Chairs.
National Science Foundation (NSF) Proposal Review Panels.
11. Professional development activities in the last five years
Develop two new graduate courses, EE710 Introduction to Multicarrier Systems and EE615 Multicarrier Systems for Fall 2001 and Fall 2002 respectively.
Developing new course EE665, Multidimensional Signal Processing to be delivered on Webcampus, Stevens Institute of Technology.
Yu-Dong Yao
1. Name and Academic Rank
Yu-Dong Yao, Associate Professor
2. Degrees with fields, institution, and date
B.Eng., Electrical Engineering, Nanjing University of Posts and Telecommunications, Nanjing, China, 1982.
M.Eng., Electrical Engineering, Nanjing University of Posts and Telecommunications, Nanjing, China, 1985.
Ph.D., Electrical Engineering, Southeast University, Nanjing, China, 1988.
3. Number of years of service on this faculty, including date of original appointment and dates of advancement in rank
Service, 3 years Associate Professor, 2000
4. Other related experience--teaching, industrial, etc.
Areas of Active Research
Wireless communications and networks, spread spectrum and CDMA, DSP for wireless systems
Courses Taught
Undergraduate Courses
CPE/EE 322: Engineering Design IV
CPE/EE 345: Modeling and Simulation
CPE/EE 440: Current Topics in EE & CPE
Graduate Courses
EE 586: Wireless Networking: Architectures, Protocols, and Standards
EE 613: Digital Signal Processing for Communications
EE 651: Spread Spectrum and CDMA
EE 673: Wireless Communications
Off-Campus Courses
EE 586: Wireless Networking: Arch., Protocols, and Standards (coordinator)
EE 651: Spread Spectrum and CDMA
Industrial Experience
Qualcomm Inc., 1994 – 2000: Senior Engineer; Staff Engineer.
Spar Aerospace Ltd., 1990 – 1994: Member of Technical Staff; Senior MTS
5. Consulting, patents, etc.
7 patents. Communications and wireless systems
6. State(s) in which registered (none)
7. Principal publications of last five years
L. Li, H. Li, and Yu-Dong Yao, "Channel estimation and interference suppression for space-time coded systems in frequency-selective fading channels," Journal of Wireless Communications and Mobile Computing, vol.2, no.7, Nov. 2002.
H. Li, L. Li, and Y. D. Yao, "Channel estimation and interference suppression in frequency-selective fading channels," Electronics Letters, vol.38, no.8, April 2002.
M. Choi, Y. D. Yao, K. Parsa, and E. Kanterakis, "A CPCH access method for prioritized services," 2002 IEEE Vehicular Technology Conference, Volume: 3 , 2002.
E. S. El-Alfy, Y. D. Yao and H. Heffes, "A model-based Q-learning scheme for wireless channel allocation with prioritized handoff," 2001 Global Telecommunications Conference, IEEE , Volume: 6 , 2001.
[L. Li, Y. D. Yao, and H. Li, "Channel estimation and equalization for space-time block coded systems in frequency selective fading channels," 2001 Global Telecommunications Conference, IEEE , 2001.
M. Choi, Y. D. Yao, and H. Heffes, "Performance Analysis of NAK-based ARQ in Markovian Error Channels," 2001 IEEE Vehicular Technology Conference, 2001.
L. Li, H. Li, and Y. D. Yao, "Intersymbol/Cochannel Interference Cancellation for Transmit Diversity Systems in Frequency Selective Fading Channels," 2001 IEEE Vehicular Technology Conference, 2001.
L. Zhou, Y. D. Yao, and H. Heffes, "Performance Analysis of CPCH-Type Packet Channels for Variable-Bit-Rate Applications," 2001 IEEE Vehicular Technology Conference, 2001.
Z. Cao and Y. D. Yao, "Definition and Drivation of Level Crossing Rate and Average Fade Duration in an Interference-Limited Environment," 2001 IEEE Vehicular Technology Conference, 2001.
E. S. El-Alfy, Y. D. Yao, and H. Heffes, "Autonomous Call Admission Control with Prioritized Handoff in Cellular Networks," IEEE Int. Conf. Commun. (I-CC), Finland, June 2001.
8. Scientific and professional societies of which a member
IEEE. Senior Member
9. Honors and awards
Outstanding Undergraduate Student, Nanjing University of Posts and Telecommunications, Nanjing, 1982.
10. Institutional and professional service in the last five years
Institutional Service
Academic appeal committee
Non-academic appeal committee
Professional Service
Associate editor, IEEE Communications Letters
Associate editor, IEEE Trans. Vehicular Technology
Editor, IEEE Trans. Wireless Communications
11. Professional development activities in the last five years
Tutorial lecture: Multi-User Detection, IEEE VTC-Fall, 2002
WebCT Training, 2000; 2002

I-D School of Engineering Assessment System
I-D.1 School of Engineering Mission and Objectives
Consistent with the mission of Stevens Institute of Technology, the mission of the Charles V. Schaefer Jr., School of Engineering is dedicated to:
educating students to have the breadth and depth required to lead in their chosen profession in an environment replete with the excitement of new knowledge and technology creation.
Consistent with this mission, the Charles V. Schaefer Jr., School of Engineering has established the following educational objectives:
Graduates of the Charles V. Schaefer Jr., School of Engineering shall:
1. Demonstrate technical competence in engineering design and analysis consistent with the practice of a specialist and with the broad perspective of the generalist.
2. Develop the hallmarks of professional conduct, including a keen cognizance of ethical choices, together with the confidence and skills to lead, to follow, and to transmit ideas effectively.
3. Inculcate learning as a lifelong activity and as a means to the creative discovery, development, and implementation of technology.
I-D.2 Development of the School of Engineering Assessment System
As soon as the last ABET visit of the Charles V. Schafer Jr., School of Engineering was completed, an interdepartmental faculty committee was formed to develop an assessment system that
was consistent with the educational philosophy of a strong engineering core curriculum which has been the tradition at Stevens since its founding, and
would fulfill the needs for accreditation based on ABET EC2000 criteria.

In meeting its charge, the committee revised the School of Engineering mission and objectives and adopted the approach which consisted of defining broad-based statements of desired curriculum outcomes (SoE curriculum outcomes) and associated curriculum performance criteria (CPC) which are more specific assessable statements related to the curriculum outcomes. This process involved the following steps:
1. A review of the Institute mission and the School of Engineering mission and objectives,
2. A review of published studies from the engineering community and Stevens' Strategic Plan,
3. A review of the ABET EC2000 criteria along with the related terminology and definitions (e.g. program objectives and outcomes),
4. Developing of a few broad objectives (in draft form) for each program, that could be linked to the program mission and school of engineering mission and objectives,,
5. The identification of strategies and actions, (i.e. preliminary assessment process) that described how the program objectives could be achieved,
6. The identification of preliminary outcomes related to program objectives, that described how the program objectives could be assessed,
7. The connection of the SoE curriculum outcomes to ABET’s EC2000 Criterion 3 (a-k), and
8. The identification of assessment methods (or metrics) that could be implemented to assess these outcomes and the related program objectives.

Figure I-D.1. School of Engineering Assessment System
Implementation of the process as described above was a mixture of “top down” and “bottom up” approaches. For the top-down process, each program initially selected their program outcomes based on the SoE curriculum outcomes and restated them in the professional terminology of the program. They also determined if additional outcomes were warranted that went beyond the set established to ensure School-wide alignment with ABET EC2000 Criterion 3 (a-k). Further evolution of individual program outcomes will take place based on the assessment process. At the same time a “bottom up” approach was implemented which required faculty to define course outcomes that are specific to the course material and which can be assessed. A relationship between each individual course outcome and a related SoE curriculum outcome was thereby established for each course such that the entire curriculum is then fully integrated within the assessment process for continuous improvement.
In developing the assessment system, a major emphasis was directed at our educational program consisting of the core curriculum and the curriculum within each individual program. The school of engineering curriculum is designed to meet the vision of the Stevens graduate as a practicing engineer. This profile of a practitioner is integrated within the Program Objectives and the related Program Outcomes for each program.
I-D.3 Assessment Responsibilities
The School of Engineering assessment system which was developed based on the processes described above is illustrated in Figure I-D.1 and the related terminology is illustrated in Table I-D.1 which is described in more detail in the next section. This assessment system generates specific assessment data which are collected and evaluated at the course level by individual faculty, at the program level by the Program Curriculum Committee, and finally at the School of Engineering level by the SoE education and assessment committee. The on-line data collection from the various assessment tools that involve on-line surveys is managed by the school of engineering assessment center (SEAC) as described in more detail in Section I-D.6. Changes that are responses to assessment of outcomes are decided at the Program Curriculum Committee level for program-specific courses and in concert with the SoE Education and Assessment Committee for engineering core courses.
Table I-D.1. School of Engineering Assessment TerminologyABETSchool of Engineering (SoE)Program LevelCourse LevelCriterion 2
ABET ObjectivesSoE Mission and ObjectivesProgram Mission
and ObjectivesCriterion 3
ABET Outcomes
(a-k)SoE Curriculum OutcomesProgram OutcomesSoE Curriculum Performance Criteria (CPC)
Detailed outcomes for all programsProgram Performance Criteria (PPC)
subset of CPCs applicable to program
differentiates programsCourse Outcomes or Assessment Performance Criteria (APC)
Course-specific description of PPCs
Directly assessable
I-D.4 School of Engineering Curriculum Outcomes and Curriculum Performance Criteria
The Charles V. Schaefer, Jr. School of Engineering curriculum is based on a broad core that ensures breadth in the sciences, engineering and the humanities while at the same time allowing for meaningful specialization (depth) in the various engineering disciplines. On this basis, we have developed a three-level hierarchy from the SoE level to the program level to the course level as illustrated in Table I-D.1
The terminology illustrated in Table I-D.1 is based on the following definitions:
SoE Curriculum Outcomes relate to achievements of our graduates at the time of graduation and they ensure achievement of the SoE mission while meeting ABET Criterion 3 a-k for programs within SoE.
SoE Curriculum Performance Criteria (CPC) are measurable attributes related to each SoE Curriculum Outcome
Program Objectives are statements that describe the expected accomplishments of Stevens graduates during the first few years after graduation.
Program Outcomes are statements that describe what students are expected to know and are able to do by the time of graduation.
Program Performance Criteria are a sub-set of SoE Curriculum Performance Criteria (CPC) that are applicable to the individual program which distinguishes it from the other programs.
Course Assessment Performance Criteria (APC), also referred to as Course Outcomes, are course specific outcomes related to Curriculum Performance Criteria and which are assessed directly within each course
A total of thirteen School of Engineering Curriculum Outcomes have been established and their relationships to ABET Criterion 3 (a-k) outcomes are illustrated in Table I-D.2 where it is shown that the list of SoE Curriculum Outcomes extends beyond ABET Criterion 3 (a-k). Achievement of these outcomes will ensure that the ABET Criterion 3 (a-k) outcomes are satisfied while achieving the mission and objectives of the School of Engineering.
The hierarchy described in Table I-D.1 was coordinated at the School of Engineering level by the School of Engineering Education and Assessment Committee (EAC), which consisted of representatives of each program within the school. The actions of the committee were guided both by a school-wide effort that unified the expression of outcomes across the programs, and by the specific needs expressed by our program constituencies.
The SoE assessment system is published on the SoE assessment website:  HYPERLINK "http://attila.stevens-tech.edu/soe/assess/" http://attila.stevens-tech.edu/soe/assess/. It represents the common elements of our educational aspirations while providing a framework for the specific expressions within each program. Moreover, the three-level hierarchy within this system provides a direct linkage between our broad educational mission and specific assessable curricular activities. Evaluation of Course Outcomes can thereby be translated to assessment of Program Outcomes as well as the Outcomes of the SoE Core curriculum in a quantitative fashion.
As illustrated in Table I-D.3, the SoE Curriculum Performance Criteria (CPCs) are labeled in terms of their related SOE Curriculum Outcome number-Performance Criterion letter-Curriculum Performance Sub-Criterion number. For example the statement for CPC “3B3” is: “The students will have the ability to effectively use system simulations appropriate to engineering practice.” As an example, the SoE Curriculum Outcome 3 is subdivided into three performance criteria, which themselves are divided into twelve sub-criteria as illustrated in Table I-D.3.

Table I-D.2. School of Engineering Curriculum Outcomes and their Relationship to ABET Criterion 3 a-kSCHOOL OF ENGINEERING CURRICULUM OUTCOMES
By the time of graduation, our students will have:ABET Criterion 3I. Broad Based Technical Expertise Outcome 1 A&B(Scientific foundations) the ability to use applied scientific knowledge.aOutcome 1C(Engineering foundations) the ability to use applied scientific knowledge.eOutcome 2(Experimentation) the ability to design experiments, conduct experiments, and analyze experimental data.bOutcome 3(Tools) an ability to use the relevant tools necessary for engineering practice.kOutcome 4(Technical design) the technical ability to design a prescribed engineering subsystem.cOutcome 5(Design assessment) The ability to develop and assess alternative system designs based on technical and non-technical criteria.hII. Professional Advancement and Communications Outcome 6(Professionalism) the ability to recognize and achieve high levels of professionalism in their work.fOutcome 7(Leadership) an ability to assume leadership roles.dOutcome 8(Teamwork) the ability to function on teams.dOutcome 9(Communication) the ability to communicate effectively and persuasively.gIII. WorldView and Personal Development Outcome 10(Ethics and morals) a critical understanding of ethical and moral systems in a social context.fOutcome 11(Diversity) an understanding and appreciation of diversity and pluralism.jOutcome 12(Lifelong learning) a recognition of the need for and an ability to engage in lifelong learning and development. iOutcome 13(Entrepreneurship) have a fundamental knowledge and an appreciation of the technology and business processes necessary to nurture new technologies from concept to commercialization.--



Table I-D.3. School of Engineering Curriculum Outcome 3 and Related Performance CriteriaSoE Curriculum Outcome 3: (Tools) an ability to use the relevant tools necessary for engineering practice. Students will be able to use: Curriculum Performance Criterion A: machining tools.
The students will be able to use:
A1: common hand tools and fasteners as well as soldering and measurement tools such as micrometers and calipers;
A2: drills , lathe, milling machine, sander, grinding wheel and band saw;
A3: numerically controlled machine tools.
Curriculum Performance Criterion B: computer-based and information technology-based tools.
The students will have the ability to effectively use:
B1: software for preparing, transmitting, and displaying multimedia documents, including technical drawings/presentations;
B2: computational tools for finding graphical, numerical, statistical, and analytical solutions to problems;
B3: systems simulations appropriate to engineering practice;
B4: tools for searching and making use of Web-based resources
B5: synchronous and asynchronous communication tools.
B6: standard project management software tools.
Curriculum Performance Criterion C: basic analytical instrumentation and equipment.
The students will have basic skills in the following areas:
C1: chemical: general laboratory glassware, pH meter, chromatography;
C2: electrical: multimeter, oscilloscope, function generator, spectrum analyzer, thermocouple;
C3: mechanical: pressure gauges, hardness tester, tensile tester
I-D.5. Program-Level and Course-Level Outcomes
Each program formed a Program Committee to develop the assessment process within the program as described in Section B2 and B3. The chair of the Program Committee is the Program Coordinator. The Program Committee coordinated development of Program Objectives, Program Outcomes, Program Performance Criteria and Course Outcomes, as well as the various assessment tools used for the program.
The Program Outcomes at a minimum align with the SoE Curriculum Outcomes for all programs. This ensures achievement of the program mission and the SoE mission and objectives while meeting ABET Criterion 3 a-k. The SoE Curriculum Outcomes are restated into Program-specific forms within each program. The Program Outcomes are assessed using detailed outcomes at the course level, which are called Assessment Performance Criteria (APCs) or Course Outcomes. An APC is a course-specific outcome related to a Curriculum Performance Criterion. For example, the APC corresponding to CPC 3B3 for the course EN345 (Modeling of Environmental Systems) is “students will be able to implement mathematical models on computer platforms to simulate environmental systems.”
The APCs for each course were related to the Program Outcomes according to the following process:
Course instructors listed the APCs that define their courses. These relate to competencies that students should have upon completing the course.
Each APC was cross-listed with a CPC within the entire list of SoE CPCs.
The CPCs thus generated in the courses are a subset of all the CPCs in the SoE list. This subset forms the Program Performance Criteria (PPCs), which are the CPCs that constitute the program. In the future, the Program Performance Criteria will be written in program-specific terms.
The PPCs are connected to the Program Outcomes that correspond to them.
The course APCs (course outcomes) are then assessed in each course. This constitutes the assessment of the Program Outcomes at the course level.
The effective connection between the program and the interdepartmental efforts comes at this juncture, whereby the Curriculum Performance Criteria serve as categories for the more course-specific and directly assessable Assessment Performance Criteria. Each APC can be associated with a Program Outcome and therefore with a SoE Curriculum Outcome, ensuring that each of the ABET a-k criteria are covered. The Assessment Performance Criteria and their categories are available on the assessment website at for all of the courses in the program.

For assessment purposes, the school of engineering core curriculum which consists of the set of required core courses for all graduates is treated as a separate program. The results of the assessment of SoE core courses are appended to the assessment of courses within each program.
I-D.6 The School of Engineering Online Assessment Center
Background
At the early stages of development of the assessment system, the Charles V. Schaefer Jr. School of Engineering established the School of Engineering Assessment Center (SEAC) which began development of an online assessment system to facilitate data collection and related processing for assessment tools that rely on surveys of the various constituencies (students in the form of course surveys, alumni, co-op students, co-op employer). The first software system that was developed in house was named D*cide and was tested and implemented on a small scale across selected courses of the School of Engineering over three semesters. Usability and administrative problems prevented widespread adoption of D*cide. A faculty committee was set up to review the problems with D*cide and offer solutions that would make the software more effective. Specifications for an improved online assessment software were developed by the committee and the programming was implemented by Ascendus Technologies, Inc. The new online Assessment System called ACE (Ascendus Course Evaluator) was successfully implemented during Fall 2002 across all undergraduate engineering courses and was upgraded for Spring 2003.
Architectural Design of ACE
The key design goals considered for developing the architecture for the ACE software are:
Flexibility (support different types of surveys): The system allows for a variety of surveys to be conducted. Groups of users (survey responders) who may or may not be part of the Institute can be easily imported into the system and be given access to the surveys.
Simplicity/Ease of Use: The system is simple, intuitive and easy to use. Administrators, faculty and survey responders (who would be first time users) can use the system within a few minutes of logging on to the system. Back-up of data including student responses, surveys and reports can be implemented using easy user interfaces.
Maintainability - The system is easy to maintain. Student programmers are able to maintain the system and fix minor problems.
Web-enabled / Browser Based – The ACE system is browser based and accessible from outside the Stevens network without compromising on the security of the system.
Secure – The system provides for security of certain critical information such as users ids, passwords, etc. Also, the system allows for setting access right levels for different users. (Admin Users, Department Directors, Program Directors, Faculty, Student)
Interoperability – The system interacts with the Student Information System (SIS) and data flows between systems (one way from SIS database to ACE server) with minimal human intervention. This interaction is limited to periodic downloads of student, faculty and course information for batch entry into ACE and student and faculty authentication via ODBC. The flow is one-way, from SIS to ACE in the form of periodic batch updates and an ODBC connection from ACE to SIS to "read" student and faculty ID's and PIN's for authentication purposes.

End-User Features
The administrative user is able to:
Create/Import various Users into ACE.
Create departments, programs, majors, courses and course sections
Create Scale Library for various survey questions.
Create Question Library for various questions.
Create school-wide CPCs and program outcomes.
Create APCs, and other course specific questions
Save surveys to Survey Library
Create various surveys (course, coop, alumni and general surveys)
Send out activated surveys by Mass Mailing Utility by surveys/programs/majors.
View response rates for various activated and closed surveys.
Generate question ranking, graphical, statistical and excel reports for various surveys.
Generate various comparison reports for CPCs, APCs, and Dean Russ Category across courses/programs.
Export raw data of responses of various surveys for historical comparisons.

Unique Features of ACE include:
Real time user authentication with Student Information System (SIS).
Students have one URL to access all of their surveys that they need to take each semester. They access their surveys through a Web browser and complete an online form that is submitted into the ACE database through a secure encrypted connection.
Faculty access is hierarchical allowing specific faculty more administrative access to the various features of ACE and empowering all faculty members to independently participate in the survey system by adding Course Specific Questions to their own surveys and allowing them to view and save their own course reports for analysis and historical comparison. ACE notifies faculty of delinquent student responses so that faculty can encourage their students to respond to the surveys which has dramatically increased the response rate.
Program and Department Directors can easily view not only the results from their programs courses but also the coop students and alumni from their program.
Multiple levels of access and use with different views and features for each user category (in other words a variety of users such as Administrators, Admin Users, Executives, Employers, Students, Faculty and Staff, Departmental Directors and Alumni can access the system. Each category of user will see a different participation screen with distinct features enabled)
Link to program criteria (such as Course Performance Criteria and Assessment Performance Criteria). In other words, allows a particular survey question to be associated with a particular objective of the school / program. This allows administrators to understand and analyze the performance of various school entities against pre-defined goals / benchmarks.

Future Updates of the ACE Software
The School of Engineering is continually reviewing ACE and the surveying process to determine whether or not it is meeting the needs of its stakeholders and users. Expansion of the scope of the surveys is planned for the next version of the online Assessment System. For example, non-engineering courses such as Humanities, Physics, Mathematics, etc., will be included in the assessment process and revised versions of alumni surveys and coop student/employer surveys will be implemented.

I-E Detailed SoE Outcomes
As discussed in Section B3, the School of Engineering developed a three-tiered representation of program outcomes, with increasing detail as one moved to the leaves of the outcomes description tree. The labeling of the a given detailed course outcome (at the leaf level) is represented by the path through the hierarchical tree. The path is given by the broad outcome number, the letter defining the component of that outcome, and the number defining a course outcome (APC/CPC) for that outcome component (e.g., 1A3 for broad outcome 1, component A, and course outcome 3). The full expansion of the template hierarchical structure developed by the School of Engineering Education and Assessment Committee is provided below. The CPCs relate to criteria statements applying to the core engineering program and provide a basis for definition of course specific APCs. CpE program outcomes relate to the middle level of this hierarchy, stated in a manner consistent with the CpE discipline but capturing the spirit of the statements at the middle level in the template developed by the School of Engineering Education and Assessment Committee (EAC). These two statements at the middle level are labeled "CpE Outcome" and "EAC Template" in the listing below.

SoE-EAC Template with CpE Program Outcome ABET
Outcome 1: (Scientific foundations) the ability to use applied scientific knowledge. (a,e)
1A CpE Outcome: The student will be able to apply the principles of general mathematical and algorithmic thinking to the representation and solution of technical problems and be able to embed these principles in the design of electronic/optoelectronic components and systems.
EAC Template: (Math and Computer Science): When faced with a technical (a) problem, the student will be able to identify and implement relevant principles of mathematics and computer science. The students will:
CPC 1A1: recognize mathematical parameters as if they were physical variables and vice-versa,
CPC 1A2: follow the general mathematical concepts of a derivation of an engineering or scientific result and will possess the mathematical skills to link those concepts;
CPC 1A3: understand the relevance of the mathematical results to physical applications;
CPC 1A4: articulate algorithmic thinking through flow charts;
CPC 1A5: understand the role of data representation and structured flow charts in implementing algorithms.
1B CpE Outcome: The student will understand the underlying principles, models, and analytic approaches used in the basic sciences of physics and chemistry and be able to apply them in understanding and advancing electronic/optoelectronic components and systems.
EAC Template: (Physics and Chemistry): The students will be able to apply relevant (a) concepts of:
CPC 1B1: linear and angular momentum conservation and static equilibrium to point masses;
CPC 1B2: electric and magnetic fields;
CPC 1B3: atomic structure, periodic properties, chemical bonding, molecular geometry and bonding theories, thermochemistry and electrochemistry.

1C: CpE Outcome: The student will understand engineering principles of the major engineering areas and apply them to the solution of engineering problems and systems.
EAC Template: (Engineering Science) Both inside and outside their major, students will be able to: (e)
CPC 1C1: utilize mass, energy, momentum and entropy balances in diverse applications;
CPC 1C2: resolve mechanical problems involving equilibrium, stresses, strains, deformation, stability and safety factors;
CPC 1C3: recognize the classes of engineering materials, understand the general relation between processing, structure and properties and use these topics in material selection;
CPC 1C4: analyze electronic circuits utilizing principles of charge conservation, Kirchoff's Laws, Ohm's Law and Ampere's Law;
CPC 1C5: analyze dynamical systems in the frequency domain.
Outcome 2: (Experimentation) The ability to design experiments, conduct (b) experiments, and analyze experimental data.
2A CpE Outcome: The student will be able to identify directly and indirectly measured parameters for representation and modeling of physical phenomena.
EAC Template: Students will be able to define required measurements consistent with objectives.
CPC 2A1: the physical variables that reflect the phenomenon being studied;
CPC 2A2: from the relevant variables those that can be directly measured and those that must be derived from direct measurements on the basis of physical laws.
2B CpE Outcome: The student will be able to define multiple approaches for experimental studies of physical phenomena.
EAC Template: Students will be able to define alternatives( equipment or computer simulation) for measurement,.
CPC 2B1: The students will be able to judge the suitability of alternatives for measurement of: stress and strain; temperature, pressure, composition and flow; voltage, current and impedance; frequency; basic physical parameters specific to their concentration.

2C CpE Outcome: The student will be able to design and use computer-based systems for experiments on physical phenomena and to assess experimental errors associated with such experiments.
EAC Template: Utilize and implement data acquisition systems. The students will be able to:
CPC 2C1: select hardware (e.g. PC board) and calibrate the software of a state-of-the-art data acquisition system with respect to measured signal amplitude, bandwidth and dynamic range;
CPC 2C2: identify sources of errors due to improper calibration ( e.g., clipping, aliasing);
CPC 2C3: implement signal conditioning techniques.

2D CpE Outcome: The student will be able to display experimental results in a manner that demonstrates the quality of the measurements, including deviations of experimental results from analytical models
EAC Template: Validate that experimental objectives have been achieved. The students will be able to:
CPC 2D1: analyze trends, error, precision and general statistical parameters;
CPC 2D2: reformulate data to best display the physical phenomenon being studied or tested;
CPC 2D3: judiciously investigate physical reasons for nonconformity of the data to expected results.
Outcome 3: (Tools). An ability to use the relevant tools necessary for engineering (k) practice.
3A CpE Outcome: Same as template.
EAC Template: Machining tools. The students will be able to use:
CPC 3A1: common hand tools and fasteners as well as soldering and measurement tools such as micrometers and calipers;
CPC 3A2: drills , lathe, milling machine, sander, grinding wheel and bandsaw;
CPC 3A3: numerically controlled machine tools.
3B CpE Outcome: The student will be proficient in computer technologies for documentation, graphical, presentation of results, information search and retrieval, and overall project management.
EAC Template: Computer-based and information technology-based tools. The students will have the ability to effectively use:
CPC 3B1: software for preparing, transmitting, and displaying multimedia documents, including technical drawings/presentations;
CPC 3B2: computational tools for finding graphical, numerical, statistical, and analytical solutions to problems;
CPC 3B3: systems simulations appropriate to engineering practice;
CPC 3B4: tools for searching and making use of Web-based resources
CPC 3B5: synchronous and asynchronous communication tools.
CPC 3B6: standard project management software tools.
3C CpE Outcome: The student will be familiar with the basic analytical instrumentation applied in the various engineering fields.
EAC Template: Basic analytical instrumentation and equipment. The students will have basic skills in the following areas:
CPC 3C1: chemical: general laboratory glassware, pH meter, chromatography;
CPC 3C2: electrical: multimeter, oscilloscope, function generator, spectrum analyzer, thermocouple;
CPC 3C3: mechanical: pressure gauges, hardness tester, tensile tester.
Outcome 4: (Technical design) the technical ability to design a prescribed engineering (c) subsystem.
4A CpE Outcome: The student will be able to develop mathematical or other descriptive models of a system, including variable inputs to the system, system parameters defining the response of the system to its inputs, and the generation of outputs in response to system inputs and system control parameters.
EAC Template: Students will be able to understand the functionality of the required components or units. The student will be able to:
CPC 4A1: delineate the physical and chemical principles upon which the functions of each unit are based;
CPC 4A2: identify input, output and operating variables as appropriate in various units;
CPC 4A3: identify technical relationships between the input, output and variables and use the relationships to predict mutual changes.
CPC 4A4: visualize objects (parts/assemblies) and represent them using standard graphical methodologies.
4B CpE Outcome: Given the desired response of a system to inputs, the student will be able to design a system providing that response, including control parameters as appropriate.
EAC Template: Students will be able to utilize design equations to specify units or components.
CPC 4B1: Given appropriate input and desired outputs, the students will be able to specify the characteristics of the component or unit required for its construction or acquisition.
CPC 4B2: Given appropriate input and desired outputs, the students will be able to devise a control strategy for a unit process or system.
CPC 4B3: The students will be able to obtain the engineering and scientific data required in the design equations.
CPC 4B3: mechanical: pressure gauges, hardness tester, tensile tester.

4C CpE Outcome: Given a desired high-level system description, the student will be able to decompose that description into constituent interconnected components implementing the overall system function.
EAC Template: Students will be able to utilize the design equations and/or heuristics for interconnected components or units.
CPC 4C1: The students will be able to apply standard design procedures for units connected in parallel, in series or by feedback.
4D CpE Outcome: In the design of components and systems, the student will be able to determine the costs (fixed and operating) of a design of the system and compare costs of alternative designs.
EAC Template: Students will be able to establish the fixed and operating costs associated with the design.  
Outcome 5: (Design assessment) The ability to develop and assess alternative system (c,h) designs based on technical and non-technical criteria.
5A CpE Outcome: The student will be able to incorporate customer needs, environmental safeguards, and marketing features in the design and development of a system.
EAC Template: Students will be able to define overall needs and constraints. The students will be able to:
CPC 5A1: specify the product, function, or service of the system in (c)
terms of customer requirements, cost, and engineering performance criteria;
CPC 5A2: assess the social and environmental requirements of the system (h) and its impact on the global society.
CPC 5A4 : provide summaries of technical details that meet the needs of (c) financial planners and venture capitalists.
5B CpE Outcome: The student will be able to develop designs and implement designs according to a sequential schedule of activities, milestones, and barrier
EAC Template: The student will be able to link components or units together realistically to meet (c)
CPC 5B1: Given an input and a desired output, the students will be able to construct at least one rational sequence of operations that could achieve the desired output.
5C CpE Outcome: The student will be able to develop higher level representations of a system design to extract first-order needs and costs..
EAC Template: Students will be able to conduct preliminary designs and cost estimates. (c) The students will be able to:
CPC 5C1: select approximations to design equations and practical guidelines to obtain major features of system components;
CPC 5C2: identify components which generally control the system costs;
CPC 5C3: integrate product and process design where appropriate.
5D CpE Outcome: Upon completion of a design, the student will be able to create the necessary technical documentation and economic analysis as a record of the process and decisions.
EAC Template: Students will be able to establish a complete design. The student (c) will be able to:
CPC 5D1: produce final specifications, technical drawings, and plans;
CPC 5D2: develop an integrated engineering economic analysis.
5E CpE Outcome: During considerations of technical details and non-technical issues related to a system and its design, the student will be able to explore new and innovative approaches, beyond conventional designs, and assess their relative merits.
EAC Template: Students will be able to adopt imaginative and innovative approaches to the design process. The students will be able to (c)
CPC 5E1: apply creative and critical thinking skills
CPC 5E2: practice creative thinking methodologies
CPC 5E3: implement diverse problem solving strategies
5F CpE Outcome: The student will be familiar with and conversant in the creation of intellectual property
EAC Template: The student will be conversant with the creation and protection (c) of intellectual property. The students will be able to
CPC 5F1: participate in applications for patents, copyrights and trademarks.
CPC 5F2: discuss basic aspects of patent law associated with the complete design.

Outcome 6: (Professionalism) . The student will recognize and achieve high levels (f) of professionalism in their work.
6A CpE Outcome: The student will be able to develop task breakdowns and project plans with suitable timelines for project assignments
EAC Template: The students will make reliable commitments. The students will:
CPC 6A1: develop effective task breakdowns and project plans;
CPC 6A2: cultivate time management skills.
6B CpE Outcome : The student will be able to apply principles of self-assessment as a means of judging personal accomplishments.
EAC Template: The students will achieve quality and completeness. The students will
CPC 6B1: incorporate feedback from their environment;
CPC 6B2: apply self assessment to improve performance.
6C CpE Outcome: The student will understand, apply, and expect from others behaviors consistent with professional codes of ethics, such as the IEEE Code of Ethics.
EAC Template: The students will incorporate professional code of ethics in their work. The students will be able to:
CPC 6C1: identify unacceptable practices;
CPC 6C2: assume individual responsibility for implementing principles of professional practice.
Outcome 7: (Leadership). An ability to assume leadership roles. (d)
7A CpE Outcome: During participation in group projects, the student will understand the reality of stress and disappointments and will be able to contribute to the groups success under such conditions.
EAC Template: Students will be able to manage under stressful and other circumstances. The students will
CPC 7A1: identify and communicate broad view of group objectives;
CPC 7A2: maintain focus on common objectives;
CPC 7A3: establish ground rules for controlling divisive behavior.
CPC 7A4: be able to utilize a variety of leadership styles based on the circumstances
CPC 7A5: encourage where appropriate risk taking and creativity in decision making.
7B CpE Outcome: The student will be able to accept constructive criticism and be responsive to such criticism.
EAC Template: Students will be able to accept constructive criticism. The students will:
CPC 7B1: seek out the pros and cons of a policy;
CPC 7B2: be responsive to counterexamples and new questions.
7C CpE Outcome: Within group/team projects, the student will contribute to and support the building of distributed tasks and responsibilities.
EAC Template: Students will be able to develop team building activities. The students will:
CPC 7C1: encourage decentralized problem solving;
CPC 7C2: cultivate interpersonal relations through group activities;
CPC 7C3: reinforce strengths of individual group members.
7D CpE Outcome: The student will contribute to exploration of alternative approaches to a team-based project and support the development and acceptance of consensus.
EAC Template: Students will be able to achieve an integrated choice based on consensus. The students will:
CPC 7D1: be creative in producing outcomes that are sensitive to technical and non-technical issues;
CPC 7D2: acknowledge the contributions of team members;
CPC 7D3: invite submission of reasoned statements explaining opposing positions.
Outcome 8: (Teamwork) the ability to function on teams. (d)
8A CpE Outcome: While working on teams, the student will contribute to the collective planning of the team and take responsibility for the outcomes of the collective work
EAC Template: When engaged with team members, or as a part of a small group project, the students will exhibit individual accountability in relation to the quality of group work. The students will:
CPC 8A1: provide balanced and constructive criticism in defining problems and evaluating solutions;
CPC 8A2: take individual responsibility for the collective outcome of a group's work.
8B: (None)
8C CpE Outcome: While working on teams, the student will promote trust and conflict resolution.
EAC Template: When engaged with team members, or as a part of a small group project, the students will exhibit individual accountability in relation to the quality of group work, promote trust and conflict resolution. The students will:
CPC 8C1: act cooperatively and honor individual commitments;
CPC 8C2: analyze conflicts and suggest solutions.
8D CpE Outcome: While working on teams, the student will contribute positively to the exploration of alternative design and solution spaces for problems.
EAC Template: When engaged with team members, or as a part of a small group project, the students will exhibit individual accountability in relation to the quality of group work, recognize and foster the positive contributions of diverse viewpoints in problem solving. The students will:
CPC 8D1: identify and understand the assumptions associated with different conceptions of problems;
CPC 8D2: take the lead in suggesting, soliciting, and developing alternative definitions of and approaches to problems.
8E CpE Outcome: While working on teams, the student will understand and contribute to multidisciplinary viewpoints in problem solving.
EAC Template: When engaged with team members, or as a part of a small group project, the students will exhibit individual accountability in relation to the quality of group work, distinguish and contribute to multidisciplinary inputs in problem solving. The students will: 
CPC 8E1: identify and appreciate disciplinary problem orientations;
CPC 8E2: appreciate the advantages and limitations of disciplinary approaches to problems.
Outcome 9: (Communication) the ability to communicate effectively and persuasively. (g)
9A CpE Outcome: The student will be able to develop and deliver effective presentations providing the crucial concepts, ideas, and innovations related to the topic of his/her presentation.
EAC Template: Students will be able to cogently develop ideas for presentation. The students will be able to:
CPC 9A1: determine the purpose of the communication;
CPC 9A2: analyze and integrate the motivation of the audience;
CPC 9A3: clearly outline the crucial concepts and ideas;
CPC 9A4: link the communication to desired future response to stimulate the audience's action.
9B CpE Outcome: The student will be able to use alternative means of presenting ideas and information, including multimedia and Web-based approaches
EAC Template: Students will be able to choose the most effective means of communication. The students will:
CPC 9B1: be familiar with alternative forms of multimedia communication;
CPC 9B2: appreciate the advantages and disadvantages of types of communication within different contexts.
9C CpE Outcome: The student will practice effective listening, speaking, and writing skills.
EAC Template: Students will be able to practice effective listening, speaking, and writing skills. The students will:  
CPC 9C1: actively listen to presentations;
CPC 9C2: deliver presentations appropriate to audience and task.

Outcome 10: (Ethics and morals). A critical understanding of ethical and moral systems in (f) systems in a social context.:
10A CpE Outcome: Same as template
EAC Template: The students will be able to differentiate between and recognize different moral systems. The students will:
CPC 10A1: identify contemporary and historical moral systems;
CPC 10A2: understand key differences in assumptions and methodology;
CPC 10A3: recognize the origin of moral conflicts;
CPC 10A4: associate moral systems with social phenomena.
10B CpE Outcome: The student will understand relevant ethical systems and articulate ethical and moral principles in his/her professional activities.
EAC Template: The students will be able to recognize relevant ethical systems. The students will:
CPC 10B1: be conversant with the logical relations between ethical rules and moral principles;
CPC 10B2: develop logical arguments that take account of moral and ethical principles.
10C CpE Outcome: The student will understand relevant ethical systems and articulate ethical and moral principles in his/her professional activities.
EAC Template: The students will understand the rules of professional practice. The students will:
CPC 10C1: be able to identify the ethical and moral issues in the rules;
CPC 10C2: understand the legal implications of the rules;
CPC 10C3: appreciate the involvement of regulatory issues in practice;
CPC 10C4: develop a personal style of effective communication.

Outcome 11: (Diversity). An understanding and appreciation of diversity and pluralism. (j)
11A CpE Outcome: The student will understand and respect the diversity of individuals in religion, gender, race, sexual identity, class, and political associations..
EAC Template: Students will be able to recognize the distinction between and among diverse concepts of religion, gender, race, sexual identity, class and political issues. The student will:
CPC 11A1: identify and characterize the major world religions;
CPC 11A2: identify opposing issues pertaining to race, gender, and sexual identity;
CPC 11A3: appreciate different economic interests of groups in society and how these are expressed as contemporary political matters.
11B CpE Outcome: The student will understand and respect the diversity of cultural backgrounds and contributions.
EAC Template: Students will be able to recognize and be sensitive to the existence of different cultures with respect to geography, tradition, art, music, philosophy, politics and history. The students will:
CPC 11B1: seek out and/or participate in diverse cultural experiences;
CPC 11B2: gain exposure in their classes and interpersonal relationships to the world's people and cultures.
11C CpE Outcome: Same as boilerplate
EAC Template: Students will be able to develop an informed personal stance on religion, gender, race, sexual identity, class and political issues. The students will be able to:
CPC 11C1: formulate and defend opinions based on evidence and arguments regarding diversity and pluralism;
CPC 11C2: identify the consequences of tolerance and intolerance.

Outcome 12: (Lifelong learning). A recognition of the need for and an ability to (i) engage in lifelong learning and development.:
12A CpE Outcome: The student will maintain a contemporary understanding of scientific and technical concepts contributing to his/her successful professional practice.
EAC Template: Students will be able to develop and practice strategies for keeping abreast of scientific or technical concepts needed for successful professional performance. The students will:
CPC 12A1: pursue relevant continuing education programs;
CPC 12A2: follow current professional literature in various media;
CPC 12A3: actively participate in professional organizations as students and later as professionals.
12B CpE Outcome: The student will understand and apply the principles of constructive self-assessment and continuing activities for personal improvement.
EAC Template: Students will be able to develop and practice strategies for engaging in constructive self assessment and personal improvement, The students will:
CPC 12B1: identify personal strengths and weaknesses;
CPC 12B2: set short and long term goals for professional development;
CPC 12B3: engage in appropriate physical development activities;
CPC 12B4: recognize and respond to opportunities presented by change.
12C CpE Outcome: The student will maintain a contemporary understanding of changing economic and political issues.
EAC Template: Students will be able to develop and practice strategies for keeping abreast of changing economic and political issues.
CPC 12C1: The students will develop a critical appreciation of current events based upon selective use of various media.

Outcome 13: (Entrepreneurship). Have a fundamental knowledge and an appreciation of the (--) technology and business processes necessary to nurture new technologies from concept to commercialization.
13A CpE Outcome: Same as 13A above.
EAC Template: The students will understand the fundamentals of a typical business plan for a new high technology business.
CPC 13A1: The student should be able to identify and define the elements of a typical business plan for new ventures.  
13B CpE Outcome: Same as 13A above.
EAC Template: The students will understand the fundamentals of marketing and determining customer demand for high technology new ventures/businesses.
CPC 13B1: The student should be able to identify and apply methods to determine customer demand for typical new ventures/businesses.
CPC 13B2: The student should be able to identify typical techniques such as quality function deployment and other market research techniques used to justify high technology new ventures related to their technology

13B CpE Outcome: Same as 13A above.
EAC Template: The students will understand the fundamentals of engineering and business economics for high technology new ventures/businesses.
CPC 13C1: The student should be able to identify and define the economics and finance required for typical new ventures/businesses
CPC 13C2: The student should be able to identify typical techniques such as after tax analysis, figures of merit, income, balance sheet and income statements as well as break even analysis and other techniques used to justify hi-tech ventures related to their technology
CPC 13C3: The student should be able to understand how the capital markets are a source of funds for new ventures.


I-F: Program Specific Information
1-F.1 Program Enrollment/Graduation History
The enrollments, ethnic mixture, and other statistics for the CpE program are summarized in the following figures. Raw data is provided by the Stevens' Registrar's office, drawing on information in their databases.
Male/Female Mixture
The male/female mix of senior level students for the CpE program is shown in Figure I-F.1. For the Spring 2003 semester, the ratio of women to men is about 20% for the CpE program. This ratio, which has been sustained over the past few years, is below objectives for the proportion of women in the CpE program. Figure I-F.1 also illustrates the substantial growth of the CpE program over the past few years. There has been a small decrease in the number of new students entering the CpE program over the past two years, an effect seen at other universities and representing, perhaps, some of the economic issues driving student interests.

Figure I-F.1. CpE Undergraduate Male/Female Mixture (Seniors)
Ethnic Diversity
The ethnic mixture of our CpE students is shown in Figures I-F.2 The strong representation of Asian/Pacific Islander students is clear, as is the poor representation of African-American students (a concern). An increasing representation of Hispanic students is seen in the CpE program over the past few years.

Figure I-F.2. Ethnic Mixture of CpE Program (Seniors)
Co-op Program
Figure I-F.3 shows the number of co-op students (EE students and CpE students, along with total) over recent academic year semesters Approximately 40% of the ECE undergraduates participate in the Co-op program.

 EMBED Excel.Sheet.8 
Figure I-F.3. ECE Co-op Student Participation


I-F.2 Study plan templates for BE in Computer Engineering
Study plans are completed by all undergraduate students upon declaring their major, typically during term IV of their studies. Study plan forms are available through the Stevens' Web site, but are based on the SoE baseline program and do not include program specific information. Due to ambiguities in these SoE-based study plan templates, students routinely make mistakes in their entry of courses (required and elective) on these study plans, creating difficulties for advisors when they review the study plans. The ECE Department created a set of program-specific study plans with all program-specific required courses already filled in, restricting the student's entry of course information to only those where options are available. The ECE-specific study plans are MS Word forms with form fields in which the student enters his/her specific optional courses. These ECE-specific study plans have significantly reduced the potential for errors when reviewing student study plans. The CpE undergraduate study plan for students entering Stevens during the 2002-2003 semester is shown in Table I-F.1 below.



Table I-F.1. (a) CpE specific study plan developed for ECE students

STUDY PLAN
BACHELOR OF ENGINEERING
(For Students Entering Stevens Fall 2002: 2002-2003 Catalog)
NAME: FORMTEXT       ID:  FORMTEXT    FORMTEXT    FORMTEXT   -  FORMTEXT    FORMTEXT   -  FORMTEXT    FORMTEXT    FORMTEXT    FORMTEXT   CLASS: FORMTEXT       BOX S- FORMTEXT      

ENGINEERING CONCENTRATION FIELD: COMPUTER ENGINEERING Check here if this form is for a second undergraduate degree FORMCHECKBOX 

INSTRUCTIONS: Please print or type. The purpose of this form is to list the courses required to complete your degree program. You should revise it as needed. Roman numerals indicate the standard curriculum time schedule. If a choice of courses is given for a requirement, circle the appropriate course number. For electives, fill in the course number. Any course taken elsewhere should be marked TR. An additional study plan will be required if you wish to receive a minor or a second degree (B.A., B.S., M. ENG, or M.S.).
REQUIRED COURSES

TERM COURSE CRED. GRADE TERM COURSE CREDIT GRADE
TERM 1 TERM III
I  FORMTEXT I CH 107 or CH 181- General or Honors Chemistry IA 2/4  FORMTEXT    III  FORMTEXT III MA 221 - Differential Equations 4  FORMTEXT   
I  FORMTEXT I CH 117 or CH 187 - General Chemistry Lab 1 1  FORMTEXT    III  FORMTEXT III PEP 201 - Physics III 2.5  FORMTEXT   
I  FORMTEXT I MA 115 - Mathematical Analysis I 3  FORMTEXT    III  FORMTEXT III E 234 - Thermo & Energy Conversion 4  FORMTEXT   
I  FORMTEXT I PEP 101 or PEP 181 - Physics I or Honors Mechanics 2.5/5  FORMTEXT    III  FORMTEXT III E 245 - Circuits & Systems 3  FORMTEXT   
I  FORMTEXT I E 121 - Engineering Design I 1  FORMTEXT    III  FORMTEXT III E 231 - Engineering Design III 2  FORMTEXT   
I  FORMTEXT I E 120 - Engineering Graphics 2  FORMTEXT    III  FORMTEXT III Humanities  FORMTEXT       3  FORMTEXT   
I  FORMTEXT I CS 115 or CS 181 - Intro or Honors Computer Science 3/3.5  FORMTEXT    III  FORMTEXT III PE 200 or PE 225 - Physical Education III 1  FORMTEXT   
I  FORMTEXT I Humanities  FORMTEXT       3  FORMTEXT   
I  FORMTEXT I E 101 - Seminar 1  FORMTEXT   
I  FORMTEXT I PE 200 - Physical Education I 1  FORMTEXT   

TERM II TERM IV
II  FORMTEXT II CH 116 or CH 182- General or Honors Chemistry II 3/4  FORMTEXT    IV  FORMTEXT IV MA 227 - Multivariate Calculus 3  FORMTEXT   
II  FORMTEXT II CH 118 or CH 188 - General Chemistry Lab 1I 1  FORMTEXT    IV  FORMTEXT IV PEP 202 - Physics IV 2.5  FORMTEXT   
II  FORMTEXT II MA 116 - Mathematical Analysis II 3  FORMTEXT    IV  FORMTEXT IV E 246 - Electronics & Instrumentation 3  FORMTEXT   
II  FORMTEXT II PEP 102 or PEP 182 - Physics II or Honors E&M 2.5/5  FORMTEXT    IV  FORMTEXT IV E 232 - Engineering Design IV 2  FORMTEXT   
II  FORMTEXT II E 122 - Engineering Design II 2  FORMTEXT    IV  FORMTEXT IV CpE 360 - Computational Data Struct & Alg 3  FORMTEXT   
II  FORMTEXT II E 126 - Mechanics of Solids 4  FORMTEXT    IV  FORMTEXT IV CpE 358 - Switching Theory 3  FORMTEXT   
II  FORMTEXT II Humanities  FORMTEXT       3  FORMTEXT    IV  FORMTEXT IV Humanities  FORMTEXT       3  FORMTEXT   
II  FORMTEXT II PE 200 or PE 116 - Physical Education II 1  FORMTEXT    IV  FORMTEXT IV PE 200 or PE 226 - Physical Education IV 1  FORMTEXT   

SINGATURES: STUDENT: ________________________________________________________ DATE: _________________________________ ORIGINAL _____
FACULTY ADVISOR APPROVAL: _________________________________________________ DATE: _________________________________ REVISION ______
UG RECORDS AUDITOR: _________________________________________________________ DATE: _________________________________ REV. 9/01 MS
STUDY PLAN
BACHELOR OF ENGINEERING
(For Students Entering Stevens Fall 2002: 2002-2003 Catalog)
NAME: FORMTEXT       ID:  FORMTEXT    FORMTEXT    FORMTEXT   -  FORMTEXT    FORMTEXT   -  FORMTEXT    FORMTEXT    FORMTEXT    FORMTEXT   OTHER DEGREES PLANNED:  FORMTEXT      

ENG. CONCENTRATION: COMPUTER ENGINEERING MINOR(S):  FORMTEXT      


TERM COURSE CRED. GRADE TERM COURSE CREDIT GRADE
TERM V TERM VII
V  FORMTEXT V EE 471 - Transport Phenomena in Solid State Devices 3  FORMTEXT    VII  FORMTEXT VII CpE 476 - Digital Systems Design 3  FORMTEXT   
V  FORMTEXT V E 344 - Materials Processing 3  FORMTEXT    VII  FORMTEXT VII CpE 490 - Information Systems Eng I 3  FORMTEXT   
V  FORMTEXT V E 321 - Engineering Design V 2  FORMTEXT    VII  FORMTEXT VII Elective  FORMTEXT       3  FORMTEXT   
V  FORMTEXT V E 243 - Probability & Statistics 3  FORMTEXT    VII  FORMTEXT VII CpE 423 - Engineering Design VII 3  FORMTEXT   
V  FORMTEXT V CpE 390 - Microprocessor Systems 4  FORMTEXT    VII  FORMTEXT VII E 421 - Engineering Econ Design 2  FORMTEXT   
V  FORMTEXT V Humanities  FORMTEXT       3  FORMTEXT    VII  FORMTEXT VII Humanities  FORMTEXT       3  FORMTEXT   
V  FORMTEXT V PE 200 or PE 335 - Physical Education V 1  FORMTEXT   

TERM VI TERM IV
VI  FORMTEXT VI CpE 345 - Modeling & Simulation 3  FORMTEXT    VIII  FORMTEXT VIII EE Tech Elective  FORMTEXT       3  FORMTEXT   
VI  FORMTEXT VI E 355 - Engineering Economy 4  FORMTEXT    VIII  FORMTEXT VIII EE Tech Elective  FORMTEXT       3  FORMTEXT   
VI  FORMTEXT VI CpE 322 - Engineering Design VI 2  FORMTEXT    VIII  FORMTEXT VIII Elective  FORMTEXT       3  FORMTEXT   
VI  FORMTEXT VI EE Elective or Tech Elective  FORMTEXT       3  FORMTEXT    VIII  FORMTEXT VIII EE 424 - Engineering Design VIII 3  FORMTEXT   
VI  FORMTEXT VI  FORMDROPDOWN  * 3  FORMTEXT    VIII  FORMTEXT VIII Humanities  FORMTEXT       3  FORMTEXT     FORMTEXT   
VI  FORMTEXT VI Humanities  FORMTEXT       3  FORMTEXT   
VI  FORMTEXT VI PE 200 or PE 336 - Physical Education VI 1  FORMTEXT   

OTHER COURSES #
 FORMTEXT Term  FORMTEXT Course Number & Name  FORMTEXT Cred  FORMTEXT Grade
Notes:  FORMTEXT Term  FORMTEXT Course Number & Name  FORMTEXT Cred  FORMTEXT Grade
1 - Discipline Specific Course  FORMTEXT Term  FORMTEXT Course Number & Name  FORMTEXT Cred  FORMTEXT Grade
# - Additional courses beyond the B.E. requirements whether to meet minor require-  FORMTEXT Term  FORMTEXT Course Number & Name  FORMTEXT Cred  FORMTEXT Grade
ments , to meet second degree requirements, or extra courses (e.g., from change in  FORMTEXT Term  FORMTEXT Course Number & Name  FORMTEXT Cred  FORMTEXT Grade
field of study.  FORMTEXT Term  FORMTEXT Course Number & Name  FORMTEXT Cred  FORMTEXT Grade
* - CpE 462 is recommended for students who have not completed EE 348  FORMTEXT Term  FORMTEXT Course Number & Name  FORMTEXT Cred  FORMTEXT Grade

SINGATURES: STUDENT: ________________________________________________________ DATE: _________________________________ ORIGINAL _____
FACULTY ADVISOR APPROVAL: _________________________________________________ DATE: _________________________________ REVISION ______
UG RECORDS AUDITOR: _________________________________________________________ DATE: _________________________________ REV. 9/01 MS


Table I-F.1. (b) Completed Study Plan



Table I-F.1. (c) Completed Application for Candidacy form




I-F.3 Bachelor's in CpE through NYU/Stevens Dual Degree Program
Students completing degrees in Mathematics or Computer Science at New York University (NYU) are able to obtain a second, engineering degree in computer engineering through the NYU/Stevens Dual Degree Program. Coordination of this Dual Degree Program is through Prof. Cole (Stevens, SoE) and his counterpart at NYU. The NYU students completing an engineering degree at Stevens follow course templates. An example for the Class of 2004 is given below for NYU Computer Science students.

1st Year
Fall
V22.0101 Intro. to Computer Science I 4
V63.0021 Calculus I 4
A40.0001 Writing Workshop I 4
V37.0111 Engineering Design Laboratory I 1
V55.xxxx Morse Acad. Plan (MAP) 4
Total 17
Spring
V22.0102 Intro. to Computer Science II 4
V85.0100 Physics I 5
V63.0022 Calculus II 4
V37.0112 Engineering Design Lab II 1
A40.0002 Writing Workshop II 4
Total 18
2nd Year
Fall
V37.5126 Mechanics of Solids 4
V22.0201 Computer Systems Org I 4
V85.0101 Physics II 5
V63.0023 Calculus III 4
Total 17
Spring
V22.0202 Computer Systems Org II 4
V37.0200 Modern Physics for Engineers 3
V63.0020 Discrete Mathematics 4
OR
V63.0062 Differential Equations 4
V37.5211 Graphics Design and Lab 3
V55.xxxx Morse Acad Plan (MAP) 4
Total 19
3rd Year
Fall
V22.04XX Computer Science Elective 4
V37.7245 Circuits & Systems 3
V63.0062 Differential Equations 4
OR
V63.0020 Discrete Mathematics 4
V25.0101 General Chemistry I 4
V25.0103 General Chemistry Lab I 2
V55.xxxx Morse Acad Plan (MAP) 1
Total 21
Spring
V22.0310 Basic Algorithms 4
V37.7246 Electronics & Instrum. 4
V37.0232 Engineering Design IV 2
V25.0102 General Chemistry II 4
V25.0104 General Chemistry Lab II 2
V55.xxxx Morse Acad Plan (MAP) 1
Total 20
4th Year
Fall
CpE358 Switching Theory 3
EE 471 Transport Phenomenon 3
E344 Materials Processing 3
E234 Thermo& Energy Conv. 4
E231 Engineering Design III 2
E321 Engineering Design V 2
PE200 Physical Education 1
Total 8
Spring
CpE345 Modeling & Simulation 3
E355 Engineering Management 4
E243 Prob. and Statistics for Eng 3
CpE390 Microprocessor Lab. 1
CpE462 Intro to Image Proc. & Coding 3
CpE322 Engineering Design VI 2
PE200 Physical Education 1
Total 17
5th Year
Fall
CpE423 Engineering Design VII 4
E421 Engineering Economic Design 2
CpE487 Digital Systems Design 3
CpE490 Information Sys. Eng. I 3
E Elective2 3
TE Technical Elective 3
PE200 Physical Education 1
Total 19
Spring
CpE424 Engineering Design VIII 4
E Elective 3
TE Technical Elective 6 3
TE Technical Elective 6 3
PE200 Physical Education 1
Total 14

I-F.4 Graduate Certificate Programs in the ECE Department
The ECE Department has established a variety of focused graduate certificate programs, allowing the student (undergraduate or part-time continuing education student) to receive recognition for successful completion of the four courses in one of the Graduate Certificate programs (the Microelectronics and Photonics Graduate Certificate, delivered jointly by the ECE, Physics, and Materials Engineering programs, requires completion of five courses). To support its continuing education program, several of these certificate programs are offered as on-line programs. The 500-level graduate certificate courses have been popular among CpE undergraduate students as technical or free electives. In addition, several undergraduates complete a full graduate certificate program. Courses taken by undergraduates in a graduate certificate program can count towards both their undergraduate degree and the graduate certificate (i.e., double counting of courses is allowed in this case). The ECE Graduate Certificate Degree programs are listed below.
Digital Systems and VLSI Design
CpE 514: Computer Architecture
CpE 643: Logical Design of Digital Systems I
CpE 644: Logical Design of Digital Systems II
CpE 690: Introduction to VLSI Design
Wireless Communications. (Includes WebCampus delivery)
EE 583: Wireless Systems Overview.
EE 585: Physical Design of Wireless Systems.
EE 586: Wireless Networking: Architecture, Protocols, and Standards.
EE 641: CDMA and Spread Spectrum
Networked Information Systems. . (Includes WebCampus delivery)
CpE 560: Introduction to Networked Information Systems
CpE 591: Introduction to Multimedia Networking
CpE 678: Information Networks I
CpE 691: Information Systems Security
Secure Network Systems Design . (Includes WebCampus delivery)
CpE 560: Introduction to Networked Information Systems
CpE 592: Multimedia Network Security
CpE 654: Design and Analysis of Network Systems.
CpE 691: Information Systems Security
Multimedia Technologies . (Includes WebCampus delivery)
CpE 592: Multimedia Network Security
CpE 612: Principles of Multimedia Compression
CpE 636: Integrated Services - Multimedia
CpE 645: Image Processing and Computer Vision
Microelectronics and Photonics . (Includes some WebCampus delivery) (Interdisciplinary with the Departments of Physics and of Materials Engineering). This program requires completion of a total of five courses, with EE507 required.
EE 507: Introduction to Microelectronics and Photonics
EE 595: Physical Design of Wireless Systems
EE 626: Optical Communications
CpE 690: Introduction to VLSI Design
PEP/EE 503: Introduction to Solid State Physics
PEP/EE 561: Solid State Electronics I
Mt/EE 562: Solid State Electronics II
Mt/EE 596: Microfabrication Techniques
Mt/EE 595: Reliability & Failure of Solid State Devices
PEP/EE 515: Photonics I
PEP/EE 516: Photonics II

I-F.5 ECE Senior Projects (2002-2003)
The ECE senior project course sequence (ECE 423/424) during the 2002-2003 academic year consisted of forty different projects, with teams of at least two students and averaging between three and four students. Each team selected a faculty advisor to assist in the definition and completion of their project. Several projects were funded by companies, often companies at which students had served as interns as part of the Stevens’ Cooperative Education Program. The projects and associated faculty advisors are listed in Table I-F.2 below.
Table I-F.2. ECE Capstone Projects (2002-2003)
AY 2002-2003 Senior ProjectsProject TitleStudent Team MembersFaculty Advisor1Chaotic Spreading Spectrum System dela Cruz, Bianco, J.Choi, Quizhpi, VillarYao3Source Code Reuse MechanismVillegas, Horvath, Castro, Martinez, BrooksKiss4Autonomous Advertising RobotBurke, Sawamukai, N.Kim, Min, Tober, SzkodzinskiMan5SiteOutlook Motor SentinelEngleman, Choto, Sandiego(as EM), Brenson, MackensieTewksbury6EnviralinkCuervo, Desimone, Gerashenko, YigitChandramouli7MyStevensSethumadhavan, A.Patel, Quesada, SanchezMcNair8Voice Over IP at StevensMusgrave, Sullivan, Farley, Leyva, BlenderMan9Missile Course DeviationLasun, Sardinas, Apostol, MelloGhosh10Motion Tracking DeviceH.Choi, Gregory, Sgherza, Brozyna, TrumperMan11Platform for Media Riche Lecture DeliveryHoyt, Sweeney, Nanaszko, McAvoy, DelVecchioHeffes, Yao12Redesign of the Stevens Campus NetworkTan, Shabo, Evans, H.Kim, GrossmanGhosh13Youth Monitoring DeviceFerguson, J.Patel, KapadiaMcNair14eHousingYang, Wong,
Paet, Poon,
SanDiego Ghosh15Real-time Wireless Sensor Network – Signal Analysis for Security ApplicationsWooley, Bednarczyk, Laudato, Stander, AndersenTureli16Home Calling CenterCosta, Hughes, Beauge, Uddin, Dennis, PiperMcNair17Miniaturized MP3 PlayerBarahona, Guidi, Fontanet, AbreuMcNair18Cell Phone – Brew Based Cellphone Application DevelopmentLee, Divecha, Gandhi, Nabi, MahmoodYao19Smart AppliancesGulrajani, Ruiz, Nandi, Guevara, S.Patel(BizTech)Man20“Universal” Credit CardShah, Saifullah, Doshi, Malique, Nikil.PatelMcNair(continued)
Table I-F.2. (continued)
AY 2002-2003 Senior Projects Project TitleStudent Team MembersFaculty Advisor21Fingerprint ScannerSarkar, Dilip.Patel, Bhalla, PendseMcNair22Blue Force Tracing Geolocation ServicesParente, Harris, Giarrantano, Zuffi, CountessMcNair23Self Tuning GuitarRawani, Desai, Alba, BrocilovicMcNair24Wireless Cargo Tracking using 802.11a TechnologyDevang,Patel, Tahim, Nirav.PatelYao25Griffin EPSNikolin, Kermanshah, Nguyen, Pang, Wang, CohenTewksbury26Financial Management SoftwareComas, PuzioMan27Remote Camera ControlHepp, Mengesha, Negbenebor, Polanco, OwensMcNair28H-26L Video Coding StandardAmin, Salazar, Rafal, ChandraMan29Autonomous Underwater Vehicle Ray, Glynn, Cook, Merola, Chweij, Oyola, Surat, James, RawlinsBlicharz30Secure Data Transfer SystemEdelman, Beznicki, Sudol, EckeGhosh31Web-based Information TrackerChin, Almonte, BiancoChandramouli32Multimedia Steaming System for Wired/Wireless VideoteleconferencingArmenteros, Pham, Benavente, CadavidMan33Automobile Black BoxCardona, Walsh
Ghosh34GPS tracking of RF transceiversDempsey, BreenMcNair35Digital Player PianoStolfi, Porcaro, SaifuddinMan36LED Learners Guitar AidGuzman, Holko, AtienzaGhosh37Modular LED SignboardFundinger, Battaglia, LaPennaTewksbury38Digital Video Surveillance SystemGriffiths, Nyilas, Valencia, ZitelliSubbalakshmi39Media PadSingh, Tovmasian, Thomas, Cho, WaheedChandramouli40Electronic CaddyEmmert, Bloomstein
Boesch
I-F.6 Student Starting Salary Data
Data summarizing the salary offers of EE undergraduates are given in Table I-F.3, illustrating the high salary relative to other engineering disciplines.

Table I-F.3. Salary data for ECE undergraduates graduating in 2003.
Degree FieldLowest SalaryHighest SalaryAverage SalaryNational AverageChemical Engineering$42,000$55,000$49,400$52,200Civil/Env Engineering41,00054,00047,00041,000Computer Engineering31,00060,00051,70052,600Electrical Engineering47,00061,00054,00050,600Engineering Management30,00060,00048,70047,400Mechanical Engineering33,00055,50049,10048,700Computer Science34,00057,00046,00046,500
I-F.7 Stevens Honor Code System
Information regarding the Stevens' Honor Code is available to students on the Stevens' Web site (http://attila.stevens-tech.edu/honor_board/) and is based on the issue of plagiarism, as follows (reproduced from the above Web site).
Definition
The dictionary defines plagiarism as the act of "...stealing and using the ideas, writings, or inventions of another as one's own" or ".... taking passages, plots, or ideas from another and using them as one's own".
The Responsibilities of the Honor Board
The Honor Board at Stevens Institute of Technology upholds the dictionary's definition of plagiarism. Possible penalties for academic offenses such as plagiarism range from no credit to be given for plagiarized work (minimum penalty) to expulsion from the school. Furthermore, all penalties are to include a Dean's Action Star on the transcript of the guilty student with the following statement: "An Honor Code violation was committed in Course XXX, Semester YY (S/F)."
The penalty for knowledge of a violation of the Honor System without reporting it should not exceed the penalty given to the original offender, but may be of lesser or equal value.
The Responsibilities of Students
All academic work submitted by a student must be the result of his own thought and research.
If a student has a question regarding plagiarism and his work, it is his responsibility to consult his instructors before submission of the work.
If a student has a question or is unsure of whether discussion of the assignment among other students is allowed, it is his responsibility to ask the instructor first. Unless the instructor has told his students explicitly that they can collaborate on an assignment, all the work turned in must be the student's own.
When a student's assignment involves research, it is the student's responsibility to acknowledge outside sources or information as references. If someone else's exact words are used, it is the student's responsibility to put quotation marks around the phrase or passage in question and add an appropriate citation, thus indicating its origin. These "rules" do not apply to ideas, which are so freely used that it is part of the public domain. It is the responsibility of the student to consult his instructor so as to clarify what is and what is not part of the public domain.
"Submitting a piece of work as your own, but which in any way borrows ideas, organization, wording or anything else from another source without appropriate reference to the contributing source is plagiarism." Please refer to: http://www.chem.uky.edu/courses/commen/plagiarism.html
It is the student's responsibility to write and sign the pledge in full on each assignment, test, lab, homework, or any other work that is assigned by the instructor. Any references used during any assignment must be stated below the pledge. See By Law I of the Stevens Honor Board Constitution.
Tip: The best way to use information from a source is to read the source and take notes in your own words. Then, using your own word structure, re-write what the author said in your own words, but don't forget to cite the source!
The Responsibility of the Faculty
It is the faculty's responsibility to report any suspicion of plagiarism to the Honor Board. Faculty members may not resolve such cases, but will, instead, await the decision of the Honor Board. See Article IV, Section II of the Stevens Honor Board Constitution.
The faculty shall aid in facilitating and implementing Honor Board procedures when necessary. Please see Article IV Section IV of the Stevens Honor Board Constitution.
Examples of Plagiarism
Please refer to: www.chem.uky.edu/courses/common/plagiarism.html#Examples
Read this New York Times article about a plagiarism accusation. www.nytimes.com/library/books/092199mackay-bio.html
Links for More Information
http://www.hamilton.edu/academic/Resource/WC/AvoidingPlagiarism.html
http://condor.bcm.tmc.edu/Micro-Immuno/courses/igr/homeric.html
http://sja.ucdavis.edu/SJA/plagiarism.html
http://odin.english.udel.edu/wc/plagiarism.html


I-G CpE Evaluations
I-G.1 ECE External Advisory Board

The ECE External Advisory Board was formed in 2001 and held its first meeting during the summer of 2001. Section VA.1 provides the schedule of activities for that first meeting, with its emphasis on preparation for the ABET evaluations. In addition, the portion of the presentation at that meeting related to ABET issues is included.
Due to scheduling difficulties when setting up the summer 2002 meeting, it was necessary to provide the Board members with a written status report, summarizing the changes in the Department subsequent to the 2001 meeting. Section VA.2 provides the portion of the report related to curriculum development.
I-G.1.1 2001 Advisory Board Meeting Documentation
Electrical and Computer Engineering August 23, 2001
Draft Schedule of Activities10:00 - 10:30 am: Introductions & Review of Advisory Board Role10:30 - 12:00 am: Overview of ECE ProgramFaculty
People
Interests
NeedsUgrad Program
Enrollments
Curriculum
ABET 2000Grad Program
Enrollments
Curriculum
Masters/PhDResearch Program
Facilities
Resources
Collaborations12:00 - 1:00 am: Research Activities Presentations: Working lunch
Wireless systems programs
Multimedia and image processing program
Signal processing for communications research
Information systems security and authentication research1:00 - 2:30 am: Detailed Review of Undergraduate Programs and ABET
ABET 2000 Review in Y2003
Achieving compliance with ABET 2000 requirements.
Stevens Engineering Assessment Center (SEAC).
Objectives and outcomes.
Role of advisory board in the assessment process.
Role of advisory board in the curriculum refinement process.
Undergraduate Curriculum: Electrical Engineering & Computer Engineering
SOE "core curriculum".
Overlay of required ECE courses on SOE core curriculum.
Technical and free electives
Course evolution over past three years
Laboratories for undergraduate education
Computer and software resources provided to students.2:30 - 3:00 am: Review of Graduate Programs
On-Campus Programs
Off-Campus Programs
Distance Learning Programs
Curriculum Adjustments with New Faculty
Interdisciplinary Programs/Courses3:00 am: Adjurn


Electrical and Computer Engineering
Overall Undergraduate Program and SOE Engineering CoreABET Accreditation:
Present Situation: The ABET review will occur in 2003, with preparations required starting well in advance of the review. The SOE has established a framework through which SOE and Departmental actions can be coordinated. This will be reviewed at the meeting
Gereral Undergraduate Curriculum:
Present Situation: The EE and CpE specific courses overlay the core SOE curriculum. The overriding intent is to provide Stevens undergraduates with a broad base of knowledge covering the several engineering and science topics supplemented by depth in the student's specific discipline. The EE and CpE undergraduate curricula for the 2001-2002 catalog are on the following two pages.
Issues Impacting ECE Degrees:
The SOE core curriculum necessarily limits the number of courses which a student can take in his/her own discipline, and delays start of a significant component of discipline-specific courses until the junior year. It is appropriate to continually evaluate the mixture of core SOE courses, core ECE courses, and discipline specific electives to ensure that the appropriate mix of breadth in engineering, principles in the discipline, and specialized depth in specific topics is achieved. The two degree programs offered by the ECE Department face different needs (with EE being closer to the physical themes of general engineering than is CpE).
The areas of electrical engineering and of computer engineering are passing through a period of rapid change in the primary educational components required to prepare a student for a competitive career. Academic programs necessarily lag the changes in the "real-world" needs and this is the case for our programs. The transition from design of relatively simple systems to design of highly complex and sophisticated systems (including consideration of interdisciplinary issues) presents a particularly challenging situation. It is appropriate to continually evaluate the mixture of basic principles and engineering of complex systems in our program. Again, EE and CpE face different changing needs.

Electrical and Computer Engineering
Customizing the Engineering Core Curriculum?Strength of the Engineering Core Curriculum Concept: The Engineering Core Curriculum is a highlighted feature of the Stevens undergraduate program, providing employers with students who can both understand and work with individuals from other disciplines. The increasing importance of interdisciplinary engineering suggests that the Stevens Engineering Core Curriculum is a significant strength of the program.
Limitation of the Present Engineering Core Curriculum: The core courses are presented in such a manner as to be most suitable for the general engineering student. However, students in the discipline associated with an SOE core course are provided with less depth than desirable if provided as a discipline-specific course. For example, electrical engineering students take the same circuits courses during the sophomore year as all other engineering students, despite the topic being central to the education of an electrical engineer.
Possible General Adjustments of Engineering Core Curriculum: The following two adjustments are being considered as proposals to the SOE.
General adjustment: Due to the large number of students in the engineering program, engineering core courses are routinely divided into a number of sections to avoid classes with excessive enrollment. For example, the E245 Circuits course offered by the Electrical Engineering program typically is split into three or four sections. This multi-section aspect of the engineering core courses provides the option of allocating one or more sections to students in the offering discipline (presented with greater depth) and the other sections to students in other engineering disciplines.
Adjustment addressing needs of computer engineering. The connections of electrical engineering to physical science and engineering (chemical, materials, mechanical, etc) applications are substantial and the mathematical and conceptual principles included in the core curriculum are relevant for electrical engineers. However, the foundations and principles of computer engineering are far less coupled to the physical sciences and engineering, instead being more related to computer science and systems sciences. As a result, the core engineering curriculum dilutes the opportunity to provide computer engineers with a contemporary, competitive education. One solution would be to adjust the core curriculum to provide courses consistent with the objectives of the core curriculum but highlighting the principles and techniques from applications which best represent the career paths of computer engineers. For example: "Transport theory" can be viewed from a variety of disciplinary themes (e.g., transport of electrons, transport of fluids, etc.). However, the themes of diffusion theory, motion in a force field, etc can also be presented from the perspective of network data/information flow and its control. Control of fluid flow in complex systems can be presented from the perspective of controlling the flow of information in complex networks. Given the large size of the computer engineering course, it seems reasonable to offer computer engineering students with such discipline-designed courses.

Electrical and Computer Engineering
ECE Curriculum: Areas for Adjustment?EE Core Curriculum: The EE core curriculum consists of the specified courses (not electives) shown in bold red in the EE curriculum template earlier.
Areas for Possible Adjustment: The primary areas for improvement involve (i) increased laboratory project options integrated into courses, (ii) increased use of contemporary CAD/CAE software tools, and (iii) updating of selected courses.
EE 345: Modeling & Simulation. This is a new course. No adjustments planned.
EE 348: Systems Theory. Possible addition of MatLab problem modules.
EE 359: Electronic Circuits. Possible extension to high frequency circuits (e.g. rf).
EE 448: Digital Signal Processing. Possible addition of lab component using DSPs.
EE 465: Introduction to Communications Systems. General upgrade to emphasize contemporary data networks.
EE 471: Transport in Solid State Devices. Upgrade for focus on MOS silicon and on optoelectronics.
CpE 358: Switching Theory and Logical Design. Possible upgrade to increased use of digital logic design software tools, including simulation and verification.
CpE 390: Microprocessor Systems. Possible separation from CpE course to increased emphasis on embedded systems applications with contemporary microprocessors.

CpE Core Curriculum: The CpE core curriculum consists of the specified courses (not electives) shown in bold red in the CpE curriculum template earlier.
Areas for Possible Adjustment: The primary areas for improvement involve (i) increased integration of programming into courses, (ii) increased use of contemporary CAD/CAE software tools, and (iii) updating of selected courses.
CpE 345: Modeling & Simulation. This is a new course. No adjustments planned.
CpE358: Switching Theory and Logical Design. Possible upgrade to increased use of digital logic design software tools, including simulation and verification.
CpE 384: Data Structures & Algorithms I. Possible increase in emphasis on engineering applications and programming experiences.
CpE 390: Microprocessor Systems. Possible separation from EE course with increased emphasis on advanced systems applications with contemporary microprocessors.
CpE 462: Introduction to Image Processing and Coding. This is a new course, intended toprovide a "digital signal processing" background without the prerequisite of EE 348 (Systems Theory).
CpE 487: Digital Systems Design. Possible addition of FPGA hardware experiences in course-integrated laboratory. Increased use of VHDL software tools.
CpE 490: Information Systems Engineering I. Planned increase in programming applications for visually oriented client-server programming. Possible addition of network simulation software tools.
EE 471: Transport in Solid State Devices. If allowed, possible change from physical transport course to transport of information/data across data networks, including parallel computer networks.

I-G.1.2 Report to Advisory Board (2002)

The portion of the Status report distributed to the ECE Advisory Board in Summer 2002 is included below. Information regarding the graduate program and the research program have been deleted. Feedback regarding this report was uniformly positive. The sections of the status report dealing with the graduate program and the research program have been deleted (as noted in the text below).


Status Report to the ECE Advisory Board
Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering
Stuart Tewksbury
August 16, 2002

The meeting with the Advisory Board on Friday August 23 will be in the ECE Conference Room (2nd floor of the Burchard Building at the corner of 6th Street and River Street), starting at 10:00 am and ending around 3:00 pm. I will provide a detailed schedule before the meeting. Travel costs will be covered by the Department. If you are driving, call Cecilia Jololian (201 216-8067 or cjololia@stevens-tech.edu) to arrange for parking permits.
I have been preparing a more detailed summary of what has occurred since the last meeting but things are changing so rapidly the summary is out of date shortly after it is completed. For that reason, I am providing a briefer overview below (and will provide the details at the meeting). I have summarized the major activities completed within the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering since the last Advisory Board Meeting.
1. Undergraduate Program
1a. ABET Preparation
The next ABET evaluation will be held in Y2003 and preparations for the visit are well underway throughout the School of Engineering. I will provide a separate report on this item at the meeting. The Advisory Board will be playing an important role in the assessment aspects of our preparation for ABET and this will be a primary topic for the meeting.
1b. Curriculum Update
The primary adjustments over the past year to our electrical engineering (EE) and computer engineering (CpE) undergraduate programs are summarized below.
At the last Advisory Board meeting, some problems associated with the undergraduate computer engineering (CpE) program were discussed. Over the past year, working with the Computer Science (CS) department, changes were made in the management of specific courses to address some of those problems. In some cases, new CpE courses were created to substitute for courses previously offered by the CS department. In other cases, courses previously managed by CS were transferred to the ECE Department. In addition, changes have been made in the core engineering curriculum, providing an opportunity to introduce a new elective course and to provide students with a required course in the general area of signal/image processing. The main changes are as follows.
The CS384 (Data Structures and Algorithms) course, required for all CpE students, was replaced by a new CpE course, CpE360 (Computational Data Structures and Algorithms). The new course uses Visual C++ as the programming environment and emphasizes significant programming projects based on engineering applications.
As you may recall from our previous Advisory Board meeting, the limited exposure of our students (particularly CpE students) to programming experiences was a major deficiency in our program. To provide both computer engineering and electrical engineering (EE) students with greater experience in programming, we are adding homework assignments using development of programs to solve problems in specific course topics in many of our courses. The objective is to expand the student's familiarity with programming by integrating these programming problems within as many ECE courses as possible.
ABET expects a significant preparation in the theme of discrete mathematics but the core curriculum does not include this topic among the required math courses. We will need to discuss how to best handle this issue. At present, we are arranging to integrate the discrete math topics within the ECE core courses. However, a separate course specifically on discrete math may be more appropriate.
The Engineering core course Dynamical Systems and its associated laboratory component (required of all engineering students) were eliminated. This allowed a number of changes in both the Engineering core program and in the ECE-specific program.
Previously, a laboratory associated with the core Engineering course E245 (Circuits and Systems) met every other week. This laboratory component now meets every week, providing students with increased hands-on experience in electronics.
The laboratory previously associated with the core Engineering course E246 (Instrumentation and Measurements) also met every other week, alternating with the laboratory for E245. The laboratory component of E246 was eliminated and many of the projects associated with the E246 laboratory component were moved to the Engineering Design IV course of the core Engineering program.
With the elimination of the Dynamical Systems course, changes were made in the ECE-specific courses. The primary changes were as follows.
Electrical Engineering Program:
The EE348 (Linear Systems) course had previously provided the necessary background to all ECE students in this area but had been eliminated when the core Engineering Dynamical Systems course was introduced. With the elimination of the Dynamical Systems course, it was possible to restore the EE359 course as an EE required course.
The EE488 (Digital Signal Processing) course had previously been required for all ECE students but required substantial redesign when the EE348 (Linear Systems) course was removed. With the restoration of EE348, the EE448 course has been redesigned again, providing greater depth to students in this topic and using EE348 as a prerequisite.
A technical elective was added to the EE program's junior year, without increasing the total number of credit hours.
Computer Engineering Program:
With Dynamical Systems having been removed, it was possible to move a CpE course (CpE 358: Switching Theory & Logic Design) from the junior to the sophomore year of the Computer Engineering program.
Since CpE students are not required to complete EE348, it is not possible to require that they complete EE488 (Digital Signal Processing). However, it was felt important that CpE students be familiar with the general techniques of digital signal processing. For this reason, the CpE 462 (Image Processing and Coding) course was added to the required CpE courses in the junior year. This course does not require as much depth in linear systems as the EE488 digital signal processing course.
A technical elective was added to the CpE program's junior year, without increasing the total number of credit hours.
1c. Undergraduate Laboratory Facilities
A significant initiative was launched by the School of Engineering to establish what is presently called the "Product Innovation Laboratory" (PIL). This laboratory facility is for the purpose of providing all undergraduate engineering students with access to substantially higher level design and prototyping facilities than are presently available at Stevens. It is expected to play a large role in the senior project program, but will also be available for other undergraduate curriculum activities requiring access to these facilities. Although the undergraduate needs are the priority, the facility will be available for appropriate graduate student projects and research projects. The laboratory will occupy the entire lower floor of the Carnegie Building (building housing the Design and Manufacturing Institute). The ECE department played a substantial role in defining the resources that were needed for this facility, which will be deployed during the Fall 02 semester. ECE-requested resources acquired for this laboratory include the following.
Printed circuit board prototyping system (4 layers, surface mount & through hole) qualified for RF circuits.
Component attachment systems (through hole, surface mount including BGA, etc).
Test instrumentation (including spectrum analyzer, high bandwidth oscilloscope, etc).
General circuit assembly tools.
These resources will allow our undergraduates to design, build, and test contemporary electronic subsystems and systems in support of senior design projects. They will also allow us to develop lab project specific circuits for general use in undergraduate laboratories.

2. Graduate Program (Master's and Ph.D.) (deleted from Self-Study summary)
3. Graduate Certificate Programs (deleted from Self-Study summary)
4. Research Facilities and Programs (deleted from Self-Study summary)
5. General State of the Department
Although there remain several areas of weakness that need to be addressed during the 2002-2003 academic year, my assessment is that significant progress has occurred since our last meeting and the department's step to the next level of performance is now underway. I will review the "state of the department" at our meeting and present a summary of some of the issues we face. At this time, I would like to move towards a more formal organization for our External Advisory Board, including the naming of a Chairperson and definition of the role(s) of the Board and to Department with regards to one another. This will be one of the topics of the meeting. The issue of ABET accreditation is central to any academic program and the status of our preparation for the 2003 ABET evaluation will be discussed in detail at our meeting.
I-G.2 Alumni Survey
Results from the 2003 EE alumni survey are presented in Table I-G.1 below.
Table I-G.1: Computer Engineering Alumni Survey ResultsComparing yourself to a typical associate, how able are you in approaching technical problems with a broad engineering perspective?Much more 30% More 63% Equally 7%How much did your training at Stevens help you in becoming an effective:Team member?Very much 66% Just enough 17% A little 17%Team Leader?Very much 47% Just enough 30% A little 20%Communicator?Very much 40% Just enough 33% A little 27%Did your training in Computer Engineering help you to identify and resolve technical questions?Frequently 23% Often 57% Sometimes 17%How important is the hardware component of your Computer Engineering education at your current work place?Crucial 13% Important 40% Somewhat 27%How adequate was the computer-based component in your educational program?More than necessary 17% About right 60% Inadequate 23%How important is the computer/data networking component of your Computer Engineering education at your current work place?Crucial 23% Important 43% Somewhat 17%How adequate was the computer/data networking component in your educational program?More than necessary 13% About right 53% Inadequate 33%How well did your Computer Engineering education prepare you to address
cross-desciplinary problems at your work place?More than adequately 7% Adequately 63% Inadequately 17%How adequately did your the Computer Engineering education prepare you to approach design problems technically at your work place?More than adequately 7% Adequately 63% Inadequately 17%How effective were the following practical aspects of your Computer Engineering Program:Software labs?Very effective 40% Sufficiently 30% Ineffective 23%Hardware labs?Very effective 27% Sufficiently 57% Ineffective 17%Senior design?Very effective 56% Sufficiently 30% Ineffective 13%Total Respondents2002200120001999199819971995/6301094231124 of the 30 respondents are currently working in computer engineering, 4 outside engineering
I-G.3 V-C Co-op Student Surveys
Table I-G.2 contains data obtained from the 2003 co-op student survey

Table I-G.2 Computer Engineering Co-Op Student Survey Results (32/33 students)QuestionPlaceExc (%)Good (%)Fair (%)Poor (%)NA (%)Scientific and Engineering Foundations. The opportunity to learn and use relevant principles of mathematics, computer science, physics, chemistry, and engineering science.Co-op224416613Stevens19442539Experimentation: The opportunity to learn experimentation skills including defining data requirements and alternative approaches, using data acquisition systems, and validating results.Coop223416325Stevens34428321Tools: The opportunity to learn and use machining tools, computer and information
technology-based programs, and basic analytical instrumentation and equipment.Coop4444903Stevens19532503Technical Design: The opportunity to learn technical design including the funtionality of
components, using design equations and "rules of thumb," and establishing fixed and operating
costs.Coop252816328Stevens92541025Design Assessment: The opportunity to learn design assessment including defining overall needs and constraints, seeking innovative approaches, conducting preliminary designs and cost estimates, establishing a complete design, and creating and protecting intellectual property.Coop222516631Stevens64125028Professionalism: The opportunity to learn professional practices including making reliable comittments, achieving quality and completeness, and incorporating a professional code of ethics.Coop5634900Stevens234531300Leadership: The opportunity to learn leadership skills, including managing stressful situations,
accepting constructive criticism, developing team-building activities, and achieving integrated choices based on consensus.Coop38342233Stevens25502203Teamwork: The opportunity to learn teamwork skills including exhibiting individual accountability, promoting trust, resolving conflicts, and integrating diverse viewpoints.Coop53192503Stevens3453903
(Continued)
Table I-G.2 (Continued)QuestionPlaceExc (%)Good (%)Fair (%)Poor (%)NA (%)Professional Practice: The opportunity to learn professional skills including identifying moral and ethical issues, understanding legal implications, and complying with regulations.Coop28506313Stevens28412209Diversity: The opportunity to learn about diversity as expressed in cultures, religion, gender, race, sexual identity, and socio-economic status.Coop41229325Stevens253813025Lifelong Learning: The opportunity to keep abreast of professional developments including participating in professional organizations, engaging in self assessment and personal improvement, and staying current with economic and political issues.Coop253113625Stevens163226026Entrepreneurship: The opportunity to learn about new technology development including business plan development, marketing, and the fundamentals of engineering and business
economics.Coop253119619Stevens63138619Overall Evaluation: Provide an overall appraisal of the learning opportunities in this work assignment and the preparation you obtained.Coop47311930Stevens19661600
I-G.4 Co-op Student Employer Surveys
The questionnaires completed by employers of EE co-op students provides a view of the ability of an EE student to perform in the workplace. Although not equivalent to an assessment of the performance of a student having graduated and completed a few years of work in his/her career, the co-op employers provide a work environment in which the preparation of a student can, to a limited but useful degree, be assessed. The results of the survey distributed to employers (generally immediate supervisors) of the EE co-op students are summarized in Table I-G.3.
Companies employing EE co-op students on internships at the time of the survey are listed in the following table.

CpE Co-Op Intern Employers (Time of Survey)ACCHertzMarshBecton DickinsonHunter DouglasPanasonicBirdsallL-3 CommunicationsSurvivor WindowsBergmannLehmanUPSBurgiss GroupLyonnaisVollmerClass LinkMarsWheelock

Table I-G.3 Computer Engineering Co-Op Employer Survey Results (27/33 employers)QuestionPlaceExc (%)Good (%)Fair (%)Poor (%)NA (%)Scientific and Engineering Foundations. Scientific knowledge as demonstrated by the ability to use relevant principles of mathematics, computer science, physics, chemistry, and engineering science.Perform-ance33487011Prepara-tion314612011Experimentation: Experimentation as demonstrated by defining data requirements and alternative approaches, using data acquisition systems, and validating results.Perform-ance4841704Prepara-tion37481104Tools: The use of tools as demonstrated by proficiency with machining tools, computer and
information technology-based programs, and basic analytical instrumentation and equipment.Perform-ance5637404Prepara-tion5237704Technical Design: Design as demonstrated by understanding the functionality of components, using design equations and "rules of thumb," and establishing fixed and operating costs.Perform-ance37374022Prepara-tion33377022Design Assessment: Design assessment as demonstrated by defining overall needs and
constraints, seeking innovative approaches, conducting preliminary designs and cost estimates,establishing a complete design, and creating and protecting intellectual property.Perform-ance304411015Prepara-tion373019015Professionalism: Professionalism as demonstrated by making reliable comittments, achieving quality and completeness, and incorporating a professional code of ethics in one`s work.Perform-ance5637700Prepara-tion4844700Leadership: Leadership as demonstrated by successfully managing stressful situations, accepting constructive criticism, developing team-building activities, and achieving integrated choices based on consensus.Perform-ance44411104Prepara-tion42312304Teamwork: Teamwork as demonstrated by exhibiting individual accountability, promoting trust, resolving conflicts, and integrating diverse viewpoints.Perform-ance5241404Prepara-tion4448404
(Continued)
Table I-G.3. (Continued)QuestionPlaceExc (%)Good (%)Fair (%)Poor (%)NA (%)Communication: Communication as demonstrated by effective communication skills including developing ideas cogently for presentation, choosing the most effective medium of communication, and practicing effective listening, speaking and writing skills.Perform-ance4844700Prepara-tion4151700Professional Practice: Professional practice as demonstrated by identifying moral and ethical issues, understanding legal implications, and complying with regulations.Perform-ance44374015Prepara-tion41414015Diversity: Diversity as demonstrated by showing respect for diverse cultures, religion, gender, race, sexual identity, and socio-economic status.Perform-ance55330011Prepara-tion52334011Lifelong Learning: Lifelong learning as demonstrated by keeping abreast of professional developments, participating in professional organizations, engaging in self assessment and personal improvement, and staying current with economic and political issues.Perform-ance4444704Prepara-tion44371504Overall Evaluation: Provide an overall appraisal of the learning opportunities in this work assignment and the preparation you obtained.Perform-ance5141700Prepara-tion4451400

I-G.5 Student Evaluations of Courses

Table I-G.4 shows the overall average ranking extracted from student course evaluations for the CpE program courses and for the broad outcomes (1-13). Included in the table are the rankings also for the CpE program outcomes. The quality of such results depends on the number of courses contributing to the average and that number is included in the table. The ranking range is from 1 to 4 (corresponding to the use of the four responses specifying a level of new learning and ignoring the "not applicable" and "unsure" responses).
The data shown in Table I-G.4 is obtained by first combining the data from the various courses contributing to a program outcome. An example for outcome 1A is shown in Table I-G.5.
The student evaluations of courses conducted at the end of the Spring 02 semester as a trial run through the Web-based course evaluation system used the SoE-EAC CPCs as the statement of the course-specific APCs in the survey. The result was low rankings for courses combined with student comments that the questions were not relevant for the course being evaluated. For the Fall 02 semester, the course APC statements were used for the questions and there was a substantial increase in the rankings of the courses, a clear demonstration of the importance of the question statements in the rating of courses. The ECE Department found the requirement that each APC statement be mapped to a corresponding CPC statement to be awkward. Although well matched to the needs of the core engineering curriculum, the set of CPCs for a given CpE program outcome are awkward matches. It is expected that the ECE Department will encourage instructors to develop a new set of APCs for their courses, namely a set connected to a given program outcome (e.g., 1A) and representing a set of criteria felt to best represent the course contributions to that program outcome. To manage this process, applying the same approach used by the SoE-EAC in developing the CPCs as a template for APC specification, the ECE Department will develop a template of bottom level (e.g., 1A2) statements representing the expectations of students at the end of their undergraduate studies. Individual course APCs will then be associated with CpE program defined templates, rather than the SoE-EAC templates. The current program outcomes will be reconsidered during this transition but will retain the requirement that they have a direct connection to the SoE-EAC hierarchical templates middle level.
A similar analysis of instructor assessments of student performance could not be performed due to the use of different measures by different instructors (alternatives were high/middle/low grades, 25%/median/75% grades, and average & +/- standard deviation grades). Had there been a uniform use of average and standard deviation by all instructors, the instructor's assessments of student performance and the students' course survey results could have been compared. To correct this problem, the ECE Department will adopt the uniform policy of using average and standard deviation of grades for a given APC by all ECE instructors (effective at the start of the Fall 03 semester.
These changes (APCs and student performance measurement metric) will not change the basic process or significantly change the APCs. Instead, they are refinements on the system to better match the process to continuing evaluations of course and program performance. Our experience with the present system indicates that this system of ongoing assessment is not intrusive once the basic process has been placed in operation and exercised.

Table I-G.4. Spring 2003 CpE student course evaluations - Outcomes.Broad OutcomeAverage (Fall 02)Average (Sp 03)Std DevProgram OutcomeAverage (max = 4)# Courses IncludedNot surveyed12.412.750.351A2.80401B2.1611C2.55822.352.640.452A2.4232D2B3.0012C2.51432.312.610.393B2.63273C2.24142.402.810.324A2.79174D4B2.82114C2.88152.402.780.285A2.7245C, 5F5B2.7455D2.7335E2.91562.612.980.446A2.8826B6C3.09272.733.130.187A3.1527B, 7D7C3.12292.652.900.439A2.8869B, 9C122.813.210.1012A3.21112B, 12C

Table I-G.5. Spring 2003 CpE student course evaluations - Details.Outcome 1AAverage = 2.8H=3.50L = 2.16CourseAPCAverageStd DevRank 4Rank 3Rank 2Rank 1E 246A1A12.680.975863CpE 3451A1 2.501.122222CpE 4401A13.350.7310730CpE 4851A12.670.941020E 245A1A22.160.975131715E 246A1A22.671.037593CpE 3581A22.900.761332152CpE 3601A2(a)2.481.065675CpE 3601A2(b)2.330.993675CpE 3451A22.750.972321CpE 423A 1A22.810.831128144CpE 423B1A23.430.493400CpE 4401A22.951.008652CpE 4851A22.670.941020CpE 3581A32.910.801426152CpE 3601A32.380.842793CpE 3451A32.880.932411CpE 4401A32.951.0910272CpE 4851A33.000.821110CpE 4881A32.500.792581CpE 3901A42.550.9741456CpE 3451A42.500.871331CpE 4871A42.880.921928156CpE 4901A43.010.732960242CpE 4401A43.001.109533CpE 4851A43.000.821110CpE 4881A42.690.853661CpE 4931A43.500.715210CpE 3581A52.750.831127184CpE 3601A52.500.8421073CpE 3901A52.591.0361166CpE 4871A52.960.95223198CpE 4901A52.950.823055246CpE 4401A53.000.877851CpE 4851A53.000.821110CpE 4881A52.350.902573CpE 4931A53.500.715210CpE 4401A53.000.877851



I-G.6 Undergraduate Student Council Survey/Report
The ECE Undergraduate Student Council’s Web page is
< http://panda.ece.stevens-tech.edu/~andriod>
I-G.7.1 Questionnaire

Electrical and Computer Engineering Advisory Committee
Student Survey

This survey was compiled by the Electrical and Computer Engineering Advisory Committee (ECEAC) as a means to collect students’ input on the quality of the ECE curriculum. The results of this survey will be used to improve the ECE department. Your survey answers will be kept strictly confidential.
If you would like to participate in the raffle, please enter your e-mail address above. Also, if you would like to join the ECE Advisory Council, please check the box above. Your e-mail address will only be used for the raffle and the mailing list, and will be removed from the survey sheet before the survey results are compiled. Thank you for your time.

Please indicate your expected major or interest:

Regarding professors, rank the qualities below based on what you feel are the most important qualities a professor should have. (1 = highest importance, 5 = lowest importance)

Preparedness for ClassAvailabilityKnowledge of SubjectFairness in gradingWork Load
Please identify any ECE classes that you feel could be improved and how they can be improved.
____________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________

Of the ECE classes you have taken, please identify any classes where you feel the subject matter should be expanded further.
____________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________

Please grade the following laboratories in terms of the criteria for each column. (A = excellent, B = Good, C = Fair, D = Poor, F = Failing, N/A = Not Applicable):

Laboratory CourseHow much you learnedLecture prepared you for lab?TA knowledge of subjectTA availabilityEquipment current?Microprocessor LabCircuits I LabCircuits II LabDesign VI

Please list any ECE courses you would like to see labs added to.
________________________________________________________________________

Please list any courses you would like to see added to our curriculum.
________________________________________________________________________

Please pick at most two (2) ECE courses you feel need changes, and what are those changes?
________________________________________________________________________

How often do you attend class? If you don’t attend class regularly, please explain why.
________________________________________________________________________

How much effort do you put into your classes? Please explain what you use to determine which classes require what amount of effort.
________________________________________________________________________

Do you find it useful if professors post lecture notes on the web? ____________________

How do you feel about the current situation regarding class size in the ECE department?
________________________________________________________________________

How do you feel about the Stevens curriculum in general? Are there any courses you would like to see removed or added?
________________________________________________________________________

How do you feel about the recitation structure of the math department’s classes? Would you like to see a similar structure in some ECE classes? What are those classes?
________________________________________________________________________

What did you think about the ECE Picnic last fall?
Would you like to see other department activities in the future? Any suggestions?
________________________________________________________________________

Please write any other comments you have concerning the ECE Department.
________________________________________________________________________



I-G.7.2 Council Report on Survey Results
Report reformatted for inclusion in Self-Study (SKT)

Undergraduate Council Report to Director

Tewks,

The following is a summary of the polls we collected. We polled the following classes:
Circuits 1
Circuits 2
Mod & Sim
Switching Theory
Design 6

We collected around 250 polls and compiled them onto excel files which I have available if you wish to see them as well. We screen out some of the comments that we felt was not useful. Anything highlighted Bold were items that a majority of the students had comments about. Anything highlighted Bold-Italics are things that the ECE council feels is critical or that we added.
Thank you.
Un Chi Sweeney, President
ECE Undergraduate Council


Report
Most of the students that took the poll attend class regularly. Those who don’t attend regularly said that they don’t attend since attendance isn’t taken. Also, the effectiveness of the professor to teach motivates the students to attend class.
Effort into course work depends on the difficulty of the courses and whether the student feels the material is interesting of useful for their future careers. Also if the professor does not adequately cover the material, students are forced to teach themselves the material that requires more effort. Lastly, a major factor of effort depends on the amount of assignments assigned.
Ranking Professors: average (out of 5)
Preparedness: 2.5
Availability: 3.4
Knowledge of Subject: 2.0
Fairness in Grading: 2.8
Work Load: 3.3

Ranking Labs: average (out of 4)
CpE 390L Microprocessor Systems Lab
How much learned: 2.1
Lecture prepared student for lab: 1.8
TA knowledge of subject: 2.5
TA availability: 2.5
Equipment Current: 1.4
E245L Circuits I Lab
How much learned: 1.9
Lecture prepared student for lab: 1.8
TA knowledge of subject: 2.5
TA availability: 2.3
Equipment Current: 2.2
E232 Engineering Design IV
How much learned: 2.9
Lecture prepared student for lab: 1.7
TA knowledge of subject: 2.9
TA availability: 2.8
Equipment Current: 2.2
ECE 322 Design VI
How much learned: 2.6
Lecture prepared student for lab: 2.6
TA knowledge of subject: 3.2
TA availability: 2.8
Equipment Current: 2.0
General Issues/Concerns
Students find posted lecture notes helpful
Language barrier between professors/TA’s and students
Multiple choice exams are not a good tests of students knowledge
Students want more web courses
More hands on classes and not just labs
Need technical skills
Old exams should be posted online
Helps students to prepare for exams
Keeps professors from being lazy and reusing exams
Department needs more money for enrollment
Scheduling conflicts
Often electives are offered at the same time
Professors of different sections of a class should correlate (especially E245 and E246)
Better continuity between circuits courses (EE359: Electronic Circuits) should be taken earlier.
Specific Courses
The top classes students want improved were Mod & Sim, Switching Theory, DSP, Microprocessors, and Circuits 1&2.
E245 (Circuits 1)
Lectures should cover materials in lab
More examples
Possibly have a specific course for just EE/CPE majors
E246 (Circuits 2)
Remove for non-EE majors
Book hard to follow/confusing
Less paperwork and more hands-on
Too much information in too little time, only learn basics
Need more hardware
Should cover physical fabrication and not just theory
Too basic and did not prepare for Circuits 3 (EE359)
EE 345 (Modeling & Simulation)
More interaction and less slides
More examples
Need application
More discussion on Matlab
See some examples
Homeworks not returned, hard to track progress and where mistakes are made
Too many formulas
Lectures should complement the text more
E 232 (Engineering Design 4)
Spent more time figuring out equipment than doing the labs
Did not really learn about circuits
EE 322 (Engineering Design 6)
Needs more structure
No relevance with preparing for Senior Design
Maybe have case studies from the past
CpE 358 (Switching Theory & Logic Design
Programs should be either discussed in class or dropped
Courses is very outdated
Only memorization involved in the course
Test should based on understanding and not memorization of matching
CpE 360 (Computational Data Structures and Algorithms)
Requires C/C++ programming which students have not been taught in any course.
Learned theory, not programming
Needs practice problems
CpE 384 (Data Structures and Algorithms)
Should teach not just program
Better organization with programming in labs
CpE 390 (Microprocessor Systems)
Better correlation between lab and class
More example problems
More in depth on ARM & SHARC material
Lab
More helpful TA
Better equipment – very faulty equipment
CpE 460 (Image Processing and Coding)
No book to supplement the lecture
Signals and Systems background needed
EE 348 (Systems Theory)
TA to help with homeworks/tutoring
More topics, expand to practical applications
EE 448 (Digital Signal Processing) DSP
Less lecturing directly from book
Don’t use slides in class
First half was taught much better than the second half (went too quickly)
Homeworks and projects too long
Less theory and more applications in Matlab
Better explanations/more in depth on topics covered
Should include physical application of theory
EE 465 (Introduction to Communication Systems)
Too much material
EE 471 (Transport in Solid State Devices)
Not much course material
Needs more structure
Add Labs to the following courses
CpE 487 Digital Systems Design
ECE 345 Modeling and Simulation
EE 348 Systems Theory
CpE 358 Switching Theory and Logic Design
EE 359 Electronic Circuits
CPE 360 Computational Data Structures & Algorithms
EE 448 Digital Signal Processing
EE 471 Transport in Solid State Devices
CPE 490/491 Information Systems I/II
CpE 462 Image Processing
ECE Class Size
Too large: Students feel it is unfair that our class sizes are so large when other departments such as the Physics department has such small classes
Add the following courses
Robotics
Control systems
Some of the online courses added as regular courses
Programming courses
Networking
CPE students listed that they would like to see Signals and Systems added to their curriculum
Network Security
Expand on Wireless Communications
UNIX administration
Web Design
Matlab
MA234 needs to be put back in the EE curriculum
Power Systems
More electives
Complex circuit (digital/analog) course
Stevens Curriculum Issues
Have thermodynamics course that is more related to EE/CPE (maybe have different thermo courses for different majors)
Physics courses
Combine the courses together and just have 2 courses for 4 credits each
Taught poorly
Some of the physics courses are not relevant
Dynamical systems is not relevant to our majors
Marketing or ECE based web design class
Reduce the amount of humanities courses required to take
Add more humanities courses – poor selection
Reduce the amount of Physical Education courses required
Too many classes not related to students major
Bioengineering isn’t relevant to EE/CPE and should be removed
Design 5 did not have any relevance to CPE/EE
CS115: didn’t really teach programming
Students felt E355 was not applicable to them
Since a majority of students enrolled at Stevens are EE/CPE, there should be more design and core courses related to EE/CPE
Recitation:
Most students think recitations would help, however there were some who didn’t think they would be effective.
The council overall felt that recitation would be helpful. Students emphasized the importance of a good TA for the recitation, otherwise they are useless
Courses that would benefit from addition of recitations are
Circuits 1
Circuits 2
Switching Theory
Transport
Systems Theory
DSP
ECE Undergraduate Picnic (Sponsored by Council)
Many students didn’t know about it
Those who attended would like to see more events
Professors
Many students complained that professors were not approachable
Handwriting of some professors is not legible
SKT: Comments of Council Deleted (Professor specific)
Many of the professors can’t speak English very well
Many professors read notes in class – why bother coming to class to be read at
SKT: Comments of Council Deleted (Professor specific)
SKT: Comments of Council Deleted (Professor specific)


ECE Undergraduate Student Council Officers
Un Chi Sweeney President Michael Komitee CpE Vice President Grace Shabo EE Vice President Greg Horvath NYU/Co-op Liaison Anthony Bianco Secretary Philip Tan TreasurerJuan Castro Andy Fundinger
Karen Leyva Grace Paet Danso Sawamuka Saro Tovmasian
Mark WooleyJohn Comas
John Hoyt Sandra Martinez Paul Poon Puneet Singh Noel Villegas Henry (Feng) YangLawrence Engleman
Robert Lee Melissa McAvoy Samir Rawani Deepak Thomas Don Wong Marvin Quesada


I-H Capstone Project APCs - Objectives 7 through 13
The two semesters of senior design (the capstone project course sequence) involve student activities that relate to most of the broad outcomes (1 through 13) of the program. Abridged lists of the APCs associated with the senior design courses CpE 423 and CpE 424 have been used elsewhere in this report, emphasizing those APCs that are appropriate to most of the students completing the senior design courses. These abridged listings have covered Objectives 1 through 6. APCs corresponding to broad outcomes 7 through 13 are listed below. Depending on the project and the student’s involvement in various parts of the project, a given student experience activities relating to many, though not all, of these APCs. However, an attempt has been made to design the course such that the full set of APCs are applicable.

Broad Outcome 7
CpE Outcome 7A
7A1: The student will participate in a modest-sized team to develop initial ideas into a full project, with the final objectives of the team evolving from the collaboration rather than being defined a-priori.
7A2: The student will be responsive to suggestions and criticisms emerging within the team as a natural element of exploring the design space but will practice standard techniques through which the team can maintain its focus on their common objective related to the project.
7A3: The student will understand the reality of devisive behavior appearing during the course of project definition and design decisions and act in such a manner that such behavior does not distract the team from its primary design mission.
7A4: The student will understand the likelihood of unexpected and/or unplanned events relevant to the project design appearing during the design phase and will be able to direct the activities of the team members to avoid such events disrupting the successful completion of the project design.
7A5: The student will understand the importance and the riske of creative solutions to problems and creative definitions of new problems to be solved and establish a realistic balance between risks and creativity.
CpE Outcome 7B
7B1: The student will understand the multi-dimensional aspects of policy and be able to understand and articulate the pros and cons of policies in a balanced manner.
7B2: The student will recognize the value of counterexamples and questions to the completion of a well thought out project proposal and will be responsive to such input.
CpE Outcome 7C
7C1: The student will understand the need to allocate different parts of the project design to different team members in order to most efficiently explore the design space of a complex systems project and the need for communications among team members to ensure that these distinct design activities merge to provide an overall project design.
7C2: The student will recognize the importance of team members establishing a cooperative group identity through which the team-based project can evolve and will contribute to identification of & participate in group activities developed for this purpose.
7C3: The student will understand the collective responsibilities of collaborative systems design and seek to understand the contributions of other team members through thoughtful review of those contributions and focussed learning of the primary technical issues and approaches of other team members.
CpE Outcome 7D
7D1: The student will understand the need to reach collective decisions which are sensitive to the variations in approaches to satisfy both technical and non-technical issues.
7D2: The student will understand the professional and interpersonal requirements to fully acknowledge the individual contributions of team members to the overall project.
7D3: The student will understand the importance of developing reasoned and clear explanations of objections and oppositions to decisions emerging from the team.
Broad Outcome 8
CpE Outcome 8A
8A1: The student will apply basic communication skills appropriate to the successful presentation of balanced and constructive criticism to decisions emerging from the team.
8A2: The student will understand and accept responsibility for the overall success of the project.
CpE Outcome 8C
8C1: The student will understand and apply basic interpersonal skills to perform cooperatively as a team member and to honor his/her individual commitments to the team project.
CpE Outcome 8D
8D1: The student will understand and apply collaboration principles to recognize and foster positive contributions that emerge from thoughtful evaluation of the assumptions that lead to diverse viewpoints in the team project.
8D2: The student will understand and contribute to the identification and evaluation of alternative approaches to problems arising in the team project.
CpE Outcome 8E
8E1: The student will understand and be able to explore solutions to project approaches which are based on different disciplines (e.g., hardware vs software solutions).
8E2: The student will understand and be able to assess the merits of a particular disciplinary approach, relative to other disciplinary approaches, to problems associated with the project.
Broad Outcome 9
CpE Outcome 9A
9A1: The student will be able to identify the primary purposes of specific communication activities related to the project and adjust his/her presentation to reflect these purposes.
9A2: The student will be able to understand the motivation of the audience in participating in a presentation and adjust his/her presentation to reflect the needs and objectives of that audience.
9A3: The student will be able to distinguish between the technical details related to any project and the higher level critical concepts and ideas related to that project and will be able to present such higher level motivations and techniques to a general audience.
CpE Outcome 9B
9B1: The student will be familiar with alternative means of multimedia information used in presenting the project design and implementation, including written technical reports, oral presentations, and Web-based presentations.
9B2: The student will understand the advantages and disadvantages of different modes of communications and adjust the presentation to reflect this understanding.
CpE Outcome 9C
9C1: The student will apply basic active listening approaches during the presentation of results from other team members, other teams, and faculty/industry advisors.
9C2: The student will apply effective speaking and writing styles suitable for the audience during presentation of the technical and applications aspects of the project.
Broad Outcome 10
CpE Outcome 10C
10C1: The student will understand and comply with the underlying ethical and moral issues associated with the rules of professional practice.
10C2: The student will understand the legal implications related to the rules of professional practice.
10C3: The student will understand and comply with regulatory issues relevant to his/her project.
10C4: The student will understand and comply with the rules of professional practice in the development of his/her personal style of communications.
Broad Outcome 12
CpE Outcome 12A
12A2: The student will be encouraged to follow current professional literature, including professional journals, trade journals, and Web-based information sources.
12A3: The student will be encouraged to join and participate in professional organizations such as the IEEE and its societies.
CpE Outcome 12B
12B1: The student will draw upon the senior design experience to develop skills and practices related to identification of personal strengths and weaknesses.
Broad Outcome 13
CpE Outcome 13A
13A1: The student will be encouraged to evaluate the potential commercial applications of the project, including the development of business plans for new ventures, when appropriate.
CpE Outcome 13B
13B1: The student will understand and apply the fundamentals of marketing and customer demand to assess the practical value of their project.
13B2: The student will understand and explore standard techniques relevant to justification of new technologies within their project for new ventures.
CpE Outcome 13C
13C1: The student will identify and present the financial aspects related to their project from the perspective of a new venture.











Appendix II Institutional Profile
II-A Institutional Background Information
I1A.1. General Information
a. Stevens Institute of Technology
9th Street - Castle Point on Hudson
Hoboken, NJ 07030

b. Chief Executive Officer
Harold J. Raveche, President

c. ABET Contact:
George P. Korfiatis Ph.D.
Dean and McLean Chair Professor
Charles V. Schaefer, Jr. School of Engineering
Stevens Institute of Technology
Hoboken NJ 07030
Tel. 201-216-5263
Fax 201-216-8909
e-mail: gkorfiat@stevens-tech.edu
II-A.2. Type of Control
Private-Non-Profit Institution of Higher Education
February 15, 1870 Act of the New Jersey State Legislature incorporated The Stevens Institute of Technology
II-A.3. Regional or Institutional Accreditation
Middle States Commission on Higher Education: Initial 1927; Most Recent 1998
ABET: Engineering, 1936; 1998
ABET: Chemical Engineering, 1986; 1998
ABET: Civil Engineering, 1987; 1998
ABET: Computer Engineering, 1986; 1998
ABET: Electrical Engineering, 1986; 1998
ABET: Environmental Engineering, 1995; 1998
ABET: Engineering Management, 1995; 1998
ABET: Mechanical Engineering, 1986; 1998
CSAB – Computer Science – Initial 1986; Most Recent 1998
Cooperative Education Accreditation Council 1999
II-A.4. Faculty and Students


Table II-A.1. Faculty and Student Count for Institution
School Year: Fall 2002HEAD COUNTFTE
(see Note 2)TOTAL STUDENT CREDIT HOURSFTPTTenure Track Faculty 119 - 119Other Teaching Faculty (excluding student assistants) 60 141 107Student Teaching Assistants 97 30 109Undergraduate Students 1716 12 1719 28,184Graduate Students 631 2220 1778 15,099Professional Degree Students - - - -1. Data are for the fall term immediately preceding the visit.
For student teaching assistants, 1 FTE equals 20 hours per week of work (or service). For undergraduate students 1 FTE equals 12 credit-hours per semester of institutional course work, meaning all courses--engineering, humanities and social sciences, etc. For graduate students 1 FTE = 9 credit-hours per semester. For full-time faculty 1 FTE = 9 credit-hours per semester. Part-time faculty are considered as one third of the full-time equivalent

II-A.5 Mission of Stevens Institute of Technology
Stevens Institute of Technology, founded in 1870, educates and inspires students to acquire the knowledge needed to lead in the creation, application and management of technology and to excel in solving problems in any profession.
The Stevens undergraduate education is built on a multidisciplinary core curriculum in engineering and science, liberal arts study and a long-standing honor system, so that students may pursue their career aspirations while having the foundation for lifelong growth in our diverse, global society. The graduate programs educate professionals to advance in industries increasingly influenced by technology, and scholars to explore the frontiers of their disciplines.
Research at Stevens strengthens education. It is centered on developing and implementing innovative technologies to help industry succeed in competitive markets, to assist government in fulfilling its responsibility to the public good, and to advance knowledge relevant to our ever-changing, technology-dominated world.
Mission
Stevens Institute of Technology has two complementary missions:
1. educating students who will succeed professionally because of their breadth of knowledge, technological innovativeness and integrity, and
2. sustaining research excellence in selected areas of engineering, science and computer science, and in the management of their creative applications for successful business practices.
Key Objectives
Stevens' mission is accomplished by:
attracting and retaining a faculty of individuals recognized as leaders in their fields and committed to the communication of their knowledge and wisdom to their students and professional colleagues;
enrolling a diverse student body of individuals of outstanding ability and motivation drawn from a cross-section of the entire nation;
establishing excellent facilities, programs, and support services that provide the necessary tools for the faculty to attain and retain leadership positions in their fields through research and professional practice;
providing excellent resources and systems for the personal, cultural and physical development of all Stevens' students;
maintaining programs that connect the educational and research activities of the Institute to technologically based industries;
encouraging and developing the steadily growing support and assistance of all its alumni and friends, corporations, foundations, and government so as to constantly freshen and rejuvenate Stevens' programs and facilities.

II-A.6 Institutional Support Units
II-A.6.1 Computing and Information Infrastructure
The Information Technology department at Stevens Institute of Technology provides both Administrative and Academic services.
Administrative services include information systems planning, evaluation, implementation, orientation, system security, and maintenance. Functional administrative computing activities are decentralized to user departments who have a staff person responsible for reporting, data maintenance and integrity, training, and daily processing activities. In addition, the Assistant Vice-President for Information Technology is responsible for student data coordination by chairing the Student Information System (SIS) Team.
Stevens administrative computing may be categorized into three general areas; centralized information systems running on an OpenVMS Alpha system, networked servers, and PC-based office automation.
The centralized administrative systems at Stevens consist of student information and financial records systems. The student information and financial records systems are the Plus2000 Series licensed from Systems and Computer Technology Corporation (SCT). The SCT Plus2000 student information system includes components for processing billing and receivables, financial aid, graduate admissions, housing, registration, degree auditing, and student records. The financial record system includes accounts payable, fixed assets, general ledger, and purchasing. Payroll processing is handled by an outside vendor (ADP) with tape interfaces to the general ledger and financial aid components of FRS and SIS.
In addition to supporting direct administrative functional users and applications IT offers inquiry access to SIS and FRS to faculty and other administrators. Faculty and administrators can review student information and class rosters online and staff and principal investigators with budget responsibility have access to up-to-date financial data. Students and prospective students are able to gain access to their records, apply for admission, and register via the World Wide Web.
Stevens is implementing Campus Pipeline, a web portal, to allow customization of access to web-based information by students, faculty and staff.
The desktop automation activities supported by IT include word processing, spreadsheet, and database applications. These activities are carried out in both standalone configurations and increasingly on administrative network servers providing file and printer services. IT also supports a Windows Server based Human Resource application (HR-1 from Ceridian Corporation) and Special Function application from Northwind Software Corporation, a networked database in the Cooperative Education Office and Office of Career Services, and a PC-based caller identification system for the Wesley J. Howe Center Information Desk.
Academic computing services include providing network design, implementation, security, services, and support to assure a rich reliable, manageable, and maintainable campus network with 24x7 service availability. This includes secure access to systems and servers for computation (Attila), Internet access, email, ftp, web, printing, scanning, and campus PC labs. IT provides user assistance/help desk services and user training with a single point of contact including in-person, telephone (hot line), email, and knowledge based assistance for reporting problems and requesting/receiving assistance in the use of computing and networking resources. Support is provided for the primary web server including the design, implementation, and support of "top level" institutional pages as well as pages associated with information technology.
The Stevens LAN connects 48 buildings on the campus including all academic, administrative, dormitories and Greek houses via a fiber optic backbone.  The LAN which has been steadily upgraded since its inception in the mid 1980’s now connects the academic buildings and some dorms at gigabit speeds, while the rest of the dorms and the Greek housing are serviced at 100Mb.  Every student that resides on campus has a wired network port.  The LAN connects to the outside world through three links, a 5Mb link to a consortium of other academic institutions in New Jersey called the NJEdge.Net, a 15Mb link to the Internet and the 155Mb link to I2 via the vBNS backbone.  A majority of the core network was upgraded in 2002; a Cisco PIX 535R firewall and dual Cisco VPN 3030 concentrators provide increased security, a new Cisco 6509 Catalysis switch router comprises the main core, and a Packeteer PacketShaper 4500 and associated Cisco routers and ATM switches shape the traffic to and from the Internet to enhance the educational uses of the network while controlling the peer to peer applications that are flourishing in the Internet today.
Stevens Wireless Network
In order to serve an increasingly mobile computing environment on campus in which all undergraduates use laptop computers, the campus has an extensive wireless network. Members of the Stevens campus community may access the campus network and the Internet from wireless locations all across campus, such as outside and within academic and residential buildings, the cafeteria, outdoors on the lawn, and more. Stevens' implementation of wireless networking is an implementation of the IEEE 802.11b wireless standard.
Stevens Undergraduate Computer Plan
All entering undergraduates are required to have a laptop computer provided through the Stevens Computer Plan. This is provided on a lease basis. The computer is loaded with a bundled set of software programs chosen annually by a committee of faculty and IT Department staff. In additional to Microsoft Office tools, students are provided with tools that will be used in design courses and elsewhere including MatLab, LabView, Visual C++. Students also have access through client software to server-based tools such as SolidWorks and Cambridge Materials Selector. Laptops are issued with a wireless card.
Computer Service Center
This center, located in the basement of the Library, provides support to the undergraduate laptop program as well as Stevens’ owned computers used by faculty and staff. Service is provided under maintenance agreements. The Service Center also arranges for computer purchase and initial set-up with Stevens licensed software.
II-A.2 Library
Stevens Institute of Technology and the Samuel C. Williams Library pioneered in offering "just-in-time" service tailored to the needs of the Stevens faculty, students and staff. This model maximizes use of Library materials and resources while effectively serving the information needs of our community. Using networked computers, students, faculty and staff can access bibliographic and full-text databases twenty-four hours a day, seven days a week. Information specialists are available to members of the Stevens community to assist in library research and to visit departments and classes for one-on-one or group instruction on the effective use of library resources. The Library has developed a set of web tutorials that all engineering Freshmen are expected to take in order to learn how to use the Library resources effectively and to do library research.
With access to the most advanced electronic delivery services, the Interlibrary Loan and Document Delivery Service can fulfill almost any request and effectively supports the research needs of faculty, students and staff. Furthermore, the Stevens community profits by a unique relationship with Engineering Information, Inc., owned by Elsevier, a major publishing company that produces the premier engineering research database. All of these services continue to improve with increases in collection size, easier electronic access and quicker turnaround time for delivery of documents, including instant desktop delivery. Indeed, with the "just-in-time" model, students and faculty now have access to a wealth of sources to consult in their research.
The Library Committee provides a link between the faculty and the Librarian and his staff. This committee is composed of faculty from various departments of the schools of engineering, science, and management. Members of the Library Committee have been active in articulating the research needs of their colleagues. They have proved essential as a sounding board for policy choices facing the Library, and they have been effective in pushing for an increased budget and, more importantly, normalizing the budgeting process for the Library.
The Library book collection (2001-2002) totals 113,541 volumes comprising 62,624 titles. The collection is kept relevant to Program needs by a process in which Program Faculty are solicited annually to direct the book purchasing of the Library. A book budget of $73,000 was fully expended in 2003 based upon faculty recommendations.
Perhaps the biggest challenge faced by the Library today is to get word out about resources available to students and faculty. In other words, the problem is less access to information, but more to convey to potential users what they have and how to use it. In this connection, Room 204 of the Library has been completely renovated since 1998. Then, it was simply another general purpose room, often used as a classroom. Today it is devoted exclusively to Library training. In addition, Information Services Librarians are regularly invited to make presentations to classes. The fact that Stevens is now a wireless campus means easy access to the Library Web page and to our electronic databases from every classroom, all of which makes for easy and effective teaching tool.
The following are some specific improvements to the library operations:
Added many new databases to the on-line access pages, these include: full service Science Direct, ACM, KNOVEL, RightNow, etc.
Use of full-text electronic access of books using: SAFARI
Library Website  HYPERLINK "http://www.Lib.stevens-tech.edu" http:www.Lib.stevens-tech.edu is enhanced monthly
with new services, tutorials and other aids to help engineering programs. The emphasis is on 24/7 access.
New concentration by Information Services professionals to demonstrate new finding techniques to engineering freshman, classroom instruction for next 3 years and further support for senior design projects.
Specialized services such as SCI-FINDER are now supported from the budgets of the individual schools in order to enhance the offerings of the library to researchers.
Of the $452,000 spent on Supplies and Expenses the largest portion $220,000 goes to electronic media.
II-A.6.3 Student Service Center

Since the last visit Stevens has responded to feedback from students and others who recommended that student "business services" be centralized in a single operations center to provide "one-stop shopping" for students. As a first step the Offices of Financial Aid, the Bursar and the Registrar were joined organizationally. Subsequently, a new Student Services Center was constructed off of the lobby on the 1st floor of the Howe Center. The goal for this new working environment was that one-third of the staff would be completely cross-trained between the three areas. Having an easily accessible, cross-functional center has improved processes and the delivery of services to students.
Additionally, an all-electronic Student Services environment has been realized to nearly the greatest extent possible. Web for Students allows for online registration, printing of schedules and unofficial transcripts, online credit card payments, viewing of financial aid, etc., and the Financial Aid Office web site is linked to services such as the online Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) and electronic alternative loan application processes. Many notifications and forms once distributed to students in hard copy are now electronic.
II-B Background Information for the Charles V. Schaefer, Jr., School of Engineering
II-B.1 Structure and Administration
II-B.1.1 Stevens Institute of Technology
Corporation and Board of Trustees
As provided in the February 15, 1870 Act of the New Jersey State Legislature incorporating The Stevens Institute of Technology, "the entire management of the affairs and concerns of the said corporation, and all the corporate powers shall be vested in the trustees to manage and control," and "the trustees shall have power to enact by-laws for the regulation and management of the said corporation or institution of learning, to fill up vacancies in the board, and to prescribe the number and description, the duties and powers of the officers, the manner of their appointment, and the term of their office" The Trustees shall select and appoint a President of the Institute whose duties shall include the administration of the Institute and the direction of its faculty.
To achieve the mission and key objectives of the Institute, final authority and responsibility are vested in the Corporation of Stevens Institute of Technology. Ownership of all property and equipment used for the operation of the Institute is vested in the Corporation. The Officers of the Institute, administrative and educational, as well as all members of the regular faculty, are appointed by the Trustees to execute the policies and plans approved by the Trustees, and all powers are either exercised by the Trustees or delegated to the President as Chief Executive Officer.
Regular meetings of the Board are held four times in each year: two in the period October through December during the fall semester and two in the period February through May during the spring semester. The first fall meeting is the annual meeting of the Board unless the Board Chairperson declares the second fall meeting as the annual meeting.
The Board is composed of five principal committees:
Executive Committee
Finance and Investment Committee
Audit Committee
Institutional Development Committee
Trusteeship Committee

President
The President of Stevens Institute of Technology, as the Institute's Chief Executive Officer, is responsible to the Board of Trustees. It is the President's responsibility to provide the overall administrative and educational leadership for the Institute.
Deans' Council
The Deans' Council is composed of the Deans of the School of Engineering, the School of Applied Sciences and Liberal Arts, and the School of Technology Management. Individually, the Dean of each School is responsible for the development and the quality of the instructional and research programs that reside in his/her School. Collectively, the Deans' Council is responsible for all inter-School academic programs including the development of curricula and the establishment of multi-disciplinary research programs.
Dean of the Faculty
The Dean of the Faculty provides a focal point for overall leadership and coordination in the support and development of the academic and research efforts of the Institute. He/she is the Chief Academic Officer of the Institute. The Chairperson of the Deans' Council acts as the Dean of the Faculty. To carry out the responsibilities of the Dean of the Faculty, he/she coordinates the educational and research activities of Deans of the individual Schools.
Table II-B.1(a) shows the major Departments/Units under each of the Schools along with the names of those responsible for the administration of these Departments/Units. The Institute governance structure is shown on Table IIB.1(b).
Table II-B.1. (a) Stevens School and Department Structure





Table II-B.1. (b). Stevens Institute Governance





Table II-B.1. (c). Charles V. Schaefer Jr., School of Engineering Structure


II-B.1.2 Charles V. Schaefer, Jr., School of Engineering Structure and Administration
The Charles V. Schaefer, Jr., School of Engineering (SoE) administrative structure is shown on Table II-B.1(c) along with the names of Associate Deans, Department Directors and Program coordinators. The Dean of SoE has overall responsibility for maintaining academic excellence and administering all functions of the School. He reports directly to the President of the Institute. SoE has two Associate Deans reporting to the Dean. Associate Dean Keith Sheppard is responsible for Undergraduate Education. His major function is administering the Design spine of the SoE curriculum and integrating the efforts of all Engineering Program Directors with respect to the Engineering Core. He chairs the SoE Engineering Education and Assessment Committee. Engineering Services, which provides all engineering support for the School Undergraduate Laboratories reports to Dean Sheppard.
Associate Dean Dinesh Verma is responsible for graduate outreach, including research and graduate off campus programs.
The Deans office is supported by an Executive Assistant. Christine DelRosario serves as the Director of Media and Assessment Services. Her responsibilities include the maintenance of the SoE web site, all SoE publications, and development and maintenance of all Program Assessment electronic tools. She supports the SoE Assessment Committee in developing curriculum and program assessment tools and executing assessment tasks.
SoE has five academic Departments each headed by a Department Director reporting to the Dean. The five departments are responsible for the development and delivery of eight undergraduate academic programs each lead by a Program Director. The Program Director is responsible for coordinating the development and delivery of the Program and interfacing with the SoE Engineering Education and Assessment Committee.
There are five Research Centers affiliated with SoE. Although those Centers operate across the Institute, their main mission is to conduct engineering research. Each of the Center Directors holds a Faculty Position in SoE. The Centers contribute to undergraduate education in a variety of ways including sharing of laboratory facilities, engaging undergraduate students in research and facilitating design projects.

SoE Committee Structure and Governance
The Voting Faculty
The voting faculty of the School of Engineering (SOE) consists of the regular faculty of the departments of the School of Engineering:
Chemical, Biochemical and Materials Engineering
Civil, Environmental and Ocean Engineering
Electrical and Computer Engineering
Mechanical Engineering
Systems Engineering and Engineering Management
Since engineering programs may be administered by another School, regular faculty members of another School can also become voting members of SOE if they meet the requirement that at least 75% of their annual teaching and at least 75% of their annual advising load are carried within their engineering program excluding involvement in off-campus and special program courses. Such faculty members need to be nominated by the Dean of SOE and their appointment approved by the majority of the voting SOE faculty. Such appointments carry a three-year term subject to review for renewal
School of Engineering Faculty Standing Committees
A. Executive Committee
Charge: The Executive committee is responsible for all aspects of the operation of the school including long term planning, annual budget development, personnel development, and all educational matters. The Executive committee also establishes and oversees all school operating procedures. The Research Center Directors join the Executive Committee in all deliberations concerning strategies for the integration of research and education, outreach to industry and government and the development of research personnel.
Membership: The membership of the Executive Committee is composed of the Dean of the School and the SOE Department Directors. The Steeple Directors are ex-officio members. The Committee is chaired by the Dean of the School of Engineering.

B. Engineering Education and Assessment Committee (EEAC)
Charge: The EEAC will be responsible for monitoring the effectiveness and evolution of the engineering curriculum. The EEAC will review and approve all core and disciplinary engineering courses as well as core science and management courses that are only given in the engineering curriculum. The committee will work closely with appropriate Curriculum Committees of the other Schools to define those core science and management courses that are offered in the engineering curriculum and in at least one other non-engineering curriculum. Such courses, which serve students in engineering and science or management curricula, will be subject to approval by the Institute Undergraduate Curriculum Committee. The Committee will oversee the work of the Design and Assessment subcommittees. The EEAC will meet periodically with the subcommittees or their representatives to insure integration of core engineering courses with design courses and disciplinary electives. The EEAC will work closely with the Assessment Subcommittee to develop, implement and monitor the educational assessment plan of the School. Toward this end, the Committee will review results of such assessments and take actions appropriate to this role
Membership: Membership will consist of six elected School of Engineering regular faculty with at least one member from each engineering department. The chairs of the Design and Assessment subcommittees are also members of the Engineering Education and Assessment Committee. The Committee will be chaired by an Associate Dean of Engineering. The terms of the elected faculty are for two staggered years.
B. Design Subcommittee
Charge: The Design Subcommittee will deal with all matters related to the design courses.
Membership: Membership consists of the design coordinator from each engineering program. The Chair of the Committee will be appointed by the Dean.
C. Assessment Subcommittee
Charge: The Assessment Subcommittee is in charge of the development of an assessment plan for the School to satisfy ABET's Engineering Criteria 2000. The Committee will develop assessment techniques, tools, and methodologies suited to the School. The Subcommittee will work closely with EEAC for implementation of the assessment plan.
Membership: Membership consists of one regular faculty member per undergraduate degree program appointed by the Department Director. No more than two additional members from the other Schools may be appointed in consultation with the Deans of the Schools. The committee will elect its chair.
D. Research and Graduate  Committee
Charge: This Committee is responsible for all matters concerning research and graduate programs in the School of Engineering. These should include, but are not limited to, developing strategic directions for research, mentoring of faculty and research staff, enhancement of the School of Engineering research infrastructure, development of policies for both research and graduate studies and maintaining academic standards. This committee will also review periodically all existing programs and make recommendations. to the Dean and the School faculty concerning the viability of such programs. The committee will review and approve all new graduate programs and courses within the School of Engineering.
Membership: The committee will be composed of one faculty member from each of the School's academic departments appointed by the Department Director and the Director of each of the School's Research Centers or his/her faculty representative. The committee will elect its chair.



The Charles V. Schaefer Jr., School of Engineering Mission
Mission Statement:
The Charles V. Schaefer Jr., School of Engineering is dedicated to educating students to have the breadth and depth required to lead in their chosen profession in an environment replete with the excitement of new knowledge and technology creation.
Objectives
The graduates of the Charles V. Schaefer Jr., School of Engineering shall:
acquire technical competence in engineering design and analysis consistent with the practice of a specialist and with the broad perspective of the generalist (Broad Based Technical Expertise),
develop the hall marks of professional conduct including a keen cognizance of ethical choices, the confidence and skills to lead, to follow, and to transmit ideas effectively (Professional Advancement and Communications), and
inculcate learning as a lifelong activity and as a means to the creative discovery, development, and implementation of technology (World View and Personal Development).

Our mission is one that confidently addresses the challenges facing engineering now and into the future yet remains true to the vision of the founders of Stevens Institute in 1870 as one of the first engineering schools in the nation. Their vision was to provide an engineering education that would prepare leaders. The success of our alumni provides abundant testimony to the strength of a Stevens education in meeting this vision. The Technogenesis environment at Stevens is an embodiment of this vision to address a more entrepreneurial orientation needed by our graduates for the years ahead.
In the Undergraduate Programs this is accomplished through a broad-based Core Curriculum of applied sciences, engineering sciences, design, management and the humanities coupled to a long-standing honor system. The curriculum is intended to provide for development of competencies that go beyond the purely technical. These competencies include: ability to analyze and provide creative solutions to problems, self reliance in approaching open-ended problems and in the use of information technologies, effective teamwork and communication skills, an understanding of the societal, economic, environmental and ethical impact of engineering decisions, an openness to and knowledge of entrepreneurial concepts that will facilitate success in a rapidly changing business environment.
The Graduate Programs educate professionals to advance in technology-based organizations and enable scholars, through their research, to explore the frontiers of their disciplines. The graduate programs also aim to impart many of the same non-technical competencies as those of the undergraduate curriculum in recognition of their importance for success at all levels in organizations. The environment for research is structured to engage faculty and students, both graduate and undergraduate, in the spectrum from knowledge creation to technology development through to commercial realization.
Our undergraduates are encouraged to engage in pre-professional experiences during their program. Many choose to enroll in the Cooperative Education Program , which provides invaluable industrial experience. While this extends the time to degree it helps students financially and is often a route to that first job on graduation. Pre-professional experience can also be obtained through summer internships in industry and through the Sponsored Senior Design Program.
Research is a key part of the mission of the School. This is accomplished through individual faculty scholarship and through collaborative efforts in a number of Research Centers and Initiatives that bring together groups of faculty, research staff, students and visiting scholars. These Centers and Initiatives are able to bring an inter-disciplinary approach to address significant research problems.
The School of Engineering is committed to Undergraduate Research which is supported within faculty research projects and Centers as well as by School and Institute scholarship programs. In particular undergraduates are encouraged to engage in Technogenesis projects in order to experience the thrill of knowledge creation as well as its transition to intellectual property and possible commercialization. II-B.3 Programs Offered and Degrees Granted

Table II-B.2 (Part 1). Engineering Programs Offered
Program
Title1Modes Offered2Nominal Years to CompleteAdministrative
HeadAdministrative
Unit or Units
(e.g. Dept.)
Exercising
Budgetary
ControlSubmitted for Evaluation3Offered, Not
Submitted for
Evaluation4DayCo-opOff CampusAlternative ModeNow Accred.Not Now
Accred.Now
Accred.Not Now
Accred.1. Engineering BExx4*A. RitterChem, Biomed & Mat.x2. Environmental Engineering BExx4*R. HiresCivil, Envir & Oceanx3. Engineering Management BExx4*J. FarrSystems & Eng. Mgmtx4. Chemical Engineering BExx4*W. LeeChem, Biomed & Mat.x5. Civil Engineering BExx4*R. HiresCivil, Envir & Oceanx6. Computer Engineering BExx4*S. TewkesburyElect. & Computer Eng.x7. Electrical Engineering BExx4*S. TewkesburyElect. & Computer Eng.x8. Mechanical Engineering BExx4*C. ChassapisMechanical Eng.x9. Environmental Engineering ME2R. HiresCivil, Envir & Oceanx10. Chemical Engineering ME2W. LeeChem, Biomed & Mat.x11. Civil Engineering ME2R. HiresCivil, Envir & Oceanx12. Computer Engineering ME2S. TewkesburyElect. & Computer Eng.x13. Electrical Engineering ME2S. TewkesburyElect. & Computer Eng.x14. Mechanical Engineering ME2C. ChassapisMechanical Eng.x15. Computer & Info. Eng. ME2S. TewkesburyElect. & Computer Eng.x16. Engineering (Optics) ME2K. BeckerEng. Physicsx17. Engineering (Physics) ME2K. BeckerEng. Physicsx18. Integrated Prod. Develop. ME *2C. ChassapisMechanical Eng.x19. Interdisciplinary Engineering ME2x20. Materials Engineering ME2W. LeeChem, Biomed & Mat.x21. Networked Info. Systems ME2S. TewkesburyElect. & Computer Eng.x22. Ocean Engineering ME2R. HiresCivil, Envir & Oceanx23. Systems Engineering ME2J. FarrSystems & Eng. Mgmtx24. Systems Des. & Op. Effect. ME2J. FarrSystems & Eng. Mgmtx25. Engineering Management ME2J. FarrSystems & Eng. Mgmtx26. Chemical Engineer3W. LeeChem, Biomed & Mat.x27. Civil Engineer3R. HiresCivil, Envir & Oceanx28. Computer Engineer3S. TewkesburyElect. & Computer Eng.x29. Electrical Engineer3S. TewkesburyElect. & Computer Eng.x30. Mechanical Engineer3C. ChassapisMechanical Eng.x31. Construction Management MS*2R. HiresCivil, Envir & Oceanx32. Maritime Systems MS2R. HiresCivil, Envir & Oceanx33. PhD4x* Interdisciplinary programNOTE: BE refers to Bachelor of Engineering, ME refers to Masters of Engineering


Table II-B.2 (Part 2). Degrees Awarded and Transcript Designations

Program Title1Modes Offered2Name of Degree Awarded3Designation on Transcript4DayCo-opOff CampusAlternative Mode1. EngineeringxxBEBE – Concentration Biomed. Eng.2. Environmental Engineering xxBEBE - Environmental3. Engineering Management xxBEBE – Eng. Management4. Chemical EngineeringxxBEBE – Chemical5. Civil Engineering xxBEBE – Civil6. Computer Engineering xxBEBE – Computer7. Electrical Engineering xxBEBE - Electrical8. Mechanical EngineeringxxBEBE - Mechanical9. Environmental EngineeringME - EnvironmentalME - Environmental10. Chemical EngineeringME - ChemicalME - Chemical11. Civil EngineeringME - CivilME - Civil12. Computer Engineering MEME - ComputerME - Computer13. Electrical Engineering MEME – Electrical ME – Electrical14. Mechanical Engineering MEME - MechanicalME - Mechanical15. Computer & Info. Eng. MEME – Computer & Info EngME – Computer & Info Eng16. Engineering Optics MEME – Engineering OpticsME – Engineering Optics17. Engineering Physics MEME – Eng PhysicsME – Eng Physics18. Integrated Prod. Develop. ME *ME -IPDME -IPD19. Interdisciplinary Engineering MEMEME - Interdisciplinary20. Materials Engineering MEME – Materials EngME – Materials Eng21. Networked Info. Systems MEME – Networked Info SystemsME – Networked Info Systems22. Ocean Engineering MEME - OceanME - Ocean23. Systems Engineering MEME - SystemsME - Systems24. Systems Des. & Op. Effect. MEME - SDOEME - SDOE25. Engineering Management MEME – Engineering ManagementME – Engineering Management26. Chemical EngineerChemical EngineerChemical Engineer27. Civil EngineerCivil EngineerCivil Engineer28. Computer EngineerComputer EngineerComputer Engineer29. Electrical EngineerElectrical EngineerElectrical Engineer30. Mechanical EngineerMechanical EngineerMechanical Engineer31. Construction Management MS*MS – Construction ManagementMS – Construction Management32. Maritime Systems MSMS- Maritime SystemsMS- Maritime Systems33. PhDPhDDoctor of Philosophy* Interdisciplinary programNOTE: BE refers to Bachelor of Engineering, ME refers to Masters of Engineering
II-B.3 Information Regarding Administrators

GEORGE P. KORFIATIS

McLean Chair Professor
Dean, Charles V. Schaefer, Jr. School of Engineering
Stevens Institute of Technology
Hoboken, New Jersey 07030
Tel: 201-216-5263 / Fax: 201-216-8909
E-mail: gkorfiat@stevens-tech.edu

Dr. Korfiatis is the Dean of the Charles V. Schaefer, Jr. at Stevens Institute of Technology where he has been a Professor of Environmental Engineering since 1983. Dr. Korfiatis has been the founding Director of the Center for Environmental Engineering which he directed from 1983 to 2002.

Dr. Korfiatis has developed and taught over 12 courses in various engineering topics during his tenure at Stevens. He has advised numerous students and has been Thesis advisor to 23 Doctoral and Master’s Theses.

He has been responsible for the execution and management of over 150 major research projects, valued over $30 million and has served as a consultant to numerous private and government organizations. Dr. Korfiatis has authored over ninety articles in professional journals, conference proceedings, handbooks and several research reports. He has co-authored five environmental technology US patents and has served in numerous environmental committees and task forces for professional organizations, industry and government. He is a co-founder of two environmental technology commercialization companies.

Dr. Korfiatis has served in numerous academic committees at Stevens including as Chairman of the Faculty Excellence Team and Chairman of the President’s Technogenesis Implementation Task Force, which is responsible for implementing Technogenesis initiatives at Stevens. He is a member of several professional organizations and serves as a reviewer to the several journals. Dr. Korfiatis holds a BS in Civil Engineering, MS and Ph.D. Degrees in Water Resources and Environmental Engineering all from Rutgers University, and an Honorary Master of Engineering from Stevens Institute of Technology.

Dean Korfiatis’ detailed resume can be found at:
 HYPERLINK "http://www.soe.stevens-tech.edu/ceoe/People/korfiatis.html" http://www.soe.stevens-tech.edu/ceoe/People/korfiatis.html
1. Name and Academic Rank
Keith G. Sheppard, Professor, Associate Dean of Engineering
2. Degrees with fields, institution, and date
B. Sc. (Metallurgy), University of Leeds, England, 1971
Diploma in Industrial Administration, Aston University, England, 1972
Ph.D. (Metallurgy), Birmingham University, England, 1980

3. Number of years of service on this faculty, including date of original appointment and dates of advancement in rank
Number: 23 years: Professor, 1992, Associate Professor, 1986, Assistant Professor, 1981, Research Assistant Professor, 1980.

4. Other related experience--teaching, industrial, etc.
Areas of Active Research - Polymeric sensor development
Courses Taught - Coordinator E101, Coordinator
Industrial Experience - Coordinating Executive, Stats(MR) Ltd, England, 1972-3, Experimental Officer, Metals & Alloys Ltd, England, 1973-75

5. Consulting, patents, etc. - Consulted for some 20 organizations in corrosion, electrodeposition, materials and failure analysis

6. State(s) in which registered - none

7. Principal publications of last five years
R..J. von Gutfeld and K.G. Sheppard, "Electrochemical microfabrication by laser-enhanced photothermal processes", I-BM Journal of Research and Development, 42, #5 (1998) pp 639-653.
K. Sheppard and B. Gallois, The Design Spine: Revision of the Engineering Curriculum to Include a Design Experience each Semester, American Society for Engineering Education Annual Conference Proceedings, Charlotte, North Carolina, June 1999, Session 3225.
H. Hadim, D. Donskoy, K. Sheppard, B. Gallois and J. Nazalewicz, Teaching Mechanics to Freshmen by Linking the Lecture Course to a Design Course, American Society for Engineering Education Annual Conference Proceedings, St. Louis, Missouri, June 2000, Session 2468.PRIVATE 
K. Sheppard, “Development of an Institutional Culture to Encourage and Teach Entrepreneurship – The Technogenesis Model at Stevens”, Proceedings of the Conference on “Teaching Entrepreneurship to Engineering Students”, Jan 13-16, 2003, Monterey, California, Engineering Conferences International, pp99-106.
K. Sheppard, P. Dominic and Z. Aronsen, “Preparing Engineering Students for the New Business Paradigm of International Teamwork and Global Orientation – Creating Effective Virtual Teams”, Proceedings of the Conference on "Enhancement of the Global Perspective for Engineering Students by Providing an International Experience", Tomar, Portugal, April 6-11 2003, Joint Meeting of Engineering Conferences International, E4, Thematic Network, and Socrates II.

8. Professional Organizations
ASEE - Chair of Design in Engineering Education Division 2002-4

Dinesh Verma, Professor and Associate Dean for Outreach
1. Education
Ph.D, Industrial and Systems Engineering, Virginia Tech, 1994
M.S., Industrial and Systems Engineering, Virginia Tech, 1991
B.E., Mechanical Engineering, Punjab Engineering College, India, 1986
2. Experience
Teaching
Developed and currently teaching 6 graduate courses in Systems Engineering
Academic
2001 – present, Associate Dean and Professor of Systems Engineering, Charles V. Schaefer, Jr. School of Engineering, Stevens Institute of Technology
2001-2002 – Distinguished Service Associate Professor, Charles V. Schaefer, Jr. School of Engineering, Stevens Institute of Technology
1995-2000, Visiting Fellow, MIRCE Research Cent, University of Exeter, DEVON, UK
1993-1994, Research Faculty, Industrial and Systems Engineering, Virginia Tech
Industrial
Lockheed Martin NE&SS – Undersea Systems, Virginia, 1995 -2001
Johnson Controls, Inc. 1997 – 1998 – Sr SE, Staff of Director of Research and Development
Fibreglass Pilkington, Inc. 1986 – 1987 – Technical Support Engineer
Consulting-patents
Consultant to several companies and government organizations including :Eastman Kodak, United Defense, PSI, VOLVO Car Corporation (Sweden), NOKI-A (Finland), RAMSE (Finland), Johnson Controls, Ericsson-SAAB Avionics (Sweden), SAAB Training Systems (Sweden), FMV (Swedish Material Command), Kongsberg Defense and Aerospace, AS (Norway), Kongsberg Protech, AS (Norway), Defense Research and Development Organization (DRDO – India), and Motorola
Patents : Co-Author of 6 US patents
6. Principal publications of last five years
Verma, D. and L.H. Johannesen, An Evaluation Framework for System Architectures, Systems Engineering, Journal of the International Council on Systems Engineering (Manuscript Submitted).
Smith, C. and D. Verma, Rating and Ranking versus Compliance Analysis: Defuzzification Techniques of Conceptual Design Evaluation, Journal of Multi-Valued Logic (Manuscript Submitted)
Farr, J.V. and D. Verma, Training Issues Associated with COTS-Based Information Intensive Systems, Journal of European Industrial Training (Accepted for Publication  December 2001)
Fabrycky, W.J., B.S. Blanchard, and D. Verma, Ocena Projektu Systemu Z Jednoczesnym Uwzgldnieniem
8. Scientific and professional societies of which a member
International Council on Systems Engineering (INCOSE) and SOLE – The International Society of Logistics

9. Honors and awards:
Fellow, International Council on Systems Engineering, 2002
Henry Morton Distinguished Professor Teaching Award, Stevens, 2002
Faculty Partnership Award ($40,000), I-BM Corporation, December 2001
Author of the Year, Lockheed Martin Undersea Systems, May 1999
Co-Recipient of Vice-President Gore’s Hammer Award, December 1997 (Member of Lockheed Martin Corp. Team on the Integrated Submarine Combat System Development Prog.)
Member of Sigma Xi, The Scientific Research Society, 1990 - Present
Member of Alpha Pi Mu, Industrial Engineering Honor Society, 1989 - Present
Outstanding Paper Presentation Award, International Council on Systems Engineering (INCOSE), Annual Symposium 1996, System Engineering Applications Track
SOLE, The International Society of Logistics:
1. Technical Paper of the Year Award, 1996
2. Presidents Award of Merit, 1993, 2000


Christine del Rosario
Director of Media & Assessment Services
Assess, analyze and recommend a plan of action for improvement of online assessment services.
Research vendor selection and manage project development.
Establish technology requirements and coordinate the development of specifications with various programs and stakeholders.
Design and maintain an information architecture that focuses on the flow of information, ease of use and a streamlined administrative process that improves workflow thereby increasing the functional scope of the assessment tool and the participation rate for faculty and students.
Publish public and restricted access Web sites for the dissemination of assessment information.
Maintain support services and troubleshooting to faculty, students and staff in the use of the online assessment tool.
Direct the marketing and motivational initiatives for increasing user participation.
Promote alumni participation in assessment surveys through print ads in alumni publications such as the Indicator Magazine and Alumni Newsletter. Facilitate access to the alumni surveys from the Alumni Online Community Web site.
Promote student participation by encouraging faculty to become the driving force behind the student response rate. Administer a reward program for students in which course sections as well as individual students are rewarded for their participation in the surveys.
Manage the multi-media initiatives of the School of Engineering
Manage and edit print publications such as the magazine, SoE InFocus, the faculty journal, and marketing materials.
Establish and promote the development of Web based applications and technology for the improvement of workflow, communication and the maximization of resources.
Direct the management of the School’s online presence via public Web sites and develop multi-media presentations.
Previous Experience
Project Manager
Web Project Team management for an Internet marketing firm, Web Zeit, Inc. Responsibilities included quality control, budgeting resource allocations, client management, and team motivation.
Information Architect
Initiated new product marketing campaign to invigorate sales by leveraging existing applications into a cohesive system for enterprise solutions. Presented new technology solutions to clients and prepared project scope and discovery documentation for future production.
Consultant
Web design and Web application development since 1998 in industries such as Law, Finance, E-Commerce, Marketing, and Education.
Education
Master of Fine Art 1996, New York Academy of Art
Bachelor of Fine Art 1994, Cum Laude, University of Michigan
Bachelor of Art 1994, Cum Laude, University of Michigan
II-B.4 Supporting Academic Departments

Table II-B.3. Supporting Academic Departments
For Academic Year: 2002/03
Department or UnitFull-time
Faculty Head CountPart-time Faculty
Head Count
FTE FacultyTeaching AssistantsHead
CountFTEChemistry and Chem. Biology1015151716Computer Science1424221917Humanities and Social Sciences13141962Mathematical Sciences152161311Physics and Eng. Physics98121410
II-B.5 Engineering Finances
SoE derives its financial support from two major sources: The Institute Operations Budget and the Schaefer Fund
Expenditures for recent years are presented in Tables II-B.4(a) and II-B.4(b).

Table II-B.4(a). Support Expenditures
Charles V. Schaefer, Jr. School of Engineering-Operational Budget
Fiscal Year12342000-20012001-20022002-20032003-2004Expenditure CategoryOperations1
(not including staff) 877,475 1,003,818 1,065,000 1,225,000Travel 89,120 164,220 247,686 250,000Equipment Institutional Funds 50,605 13,475 487,686 175,000 Grants and Gifts 211,257 155, 507 129, 137 174,276Graduate Teaching Assistants 1,304,617 1,361,031 1,279,927 1,450,000Part-time Assistance (other than teaching) 49,965 61,099 161,800 150,000

Table II-B.4(b) Expenditures
Charles V. Schaefer, Jr. School of Engineering-Schaefer Fund
Fiscal Year1998-2003Expenditure CategoryNew Faculty Start-up Packages 1,407,341
Graduate Teaching and Research Assistants 838,836
 Faculty Support and Incentives  374,389 Research Support 580,826Equipment and Laboratory Support 66,423Undergraduate Curriculum/Student Support 192,328Travel and Promotion 129,339TOTAL 3,589,482
II-B.6 Engineering Personnel and Policies
Stevens Institute of Technology has developed a comprehensive set of personnel policies which are published in the Institute’s Web Site. Policies concerning faculty are included in the Faculty Handbook:  HYPERLINK "http://attila.stevens-tech.edu/dof/fachand_handbook.html#_Toc483724562" http://attila.stevens-tech.edu/dof/fachand_handbook.html#_Toc483724562.
Table II-B.5. Personnel and Students
Entire Engineering Unit
Year: Fall 2002
HEAD COUNTFTERATIO TO FACULTYFTPTAdministrativeFaculty (tenure-track) 47 0 47Other Faculty (excluding student Assistants) 20.5 39* 32Student Teaching Assistants 33 5 36 0.3Student Research Assistants 59 59 0.7Technicians/Specialists 6 6 0.1Office/Clerical Employees 7 7 0.1OthersUndergraduate Student Enrollment 1170 1 1170 13.8Graduate Student Enrollment 232 532 494 5.8The data on this table represents actual figures reported for Fall 2002
For student teaching assistants, 1 FTE equals 20 hours per week of work (or service). For faculty members, 1 FTE equals 9 semester hour (3 courses per semester defines full-time load). Part Time load for Faculty is defined as 3 semester hour or 1 course per semester.
FTE in each category is divided by the total FTE for faculty
Department Directors allocated at 50% of time
Includes undergraduate students from all years. Data given by each Program excludes Freshmen as they do not declare a major until sophomore year

** This number includes research faculty who also may contribute to teaching and adjunct faculty.


Electrical Engineering
Year1: Fall 2002
HEAD COUNTFTERATIO TO FACULTYFTPTAdministrative0.5Faculty (tenure-track)9.509.5Other Faculty (excluding student Assistants)122.33Student Teaching Assistants8080.7Student Research Assistants120121.0Technicians/Specialists000.0Office/Clerical Employees100.1Others000.0Undergraduate Student Enrollment6137013711.6Graduate Student Enrollment4261625.21. Faculty count includes all ECE faculty members. Student assistant count includes only EE students
2. The data does not include freshmen.

Computer Engineering
Year: Fall 2002
HEAD COUNTFTERATIO TO FACULTY3FTPTAdministrative0.5Faculty (tenure-track)9.509.5Other Faculty (excluding student Assistants)133Student Teaching Assistants100100.8Student Research Assistants5050.4Technicians/Specialists000.0Office/Clerical Employees100.1Others000.0Undergraduate Student Enrollment332033226.6Graduate Student Enrollment3625443.51. Faculty count includes all ECE faculty members, Student assistant count includes only CpE students
2. The data does not include freshmen

Chemical Engineering Program
Year: 2002-2003
HEAD COUNTFTE2RATIO TO FACULTYFTPTAdministrative1Faculty (tenure-track)606Other Faculty (excluding student Assistants)232.67Student Teaching Assistants4040.46Student Research Assistants6060.69Technicians/Specialists010.10.01Office/Clerical Employees0000Others0000Undergraduate Student Enrollment (Sophomore included)71718.19Graduate Student Enrollment231628.333.271. The data does not include freshmen
Civil Engineering
Year: Fall 2002
HEAD COUNTFTERATIO TO FACULTYFTPTAdministrative122Faculty (tenure-track) 19.59.5Other Faculty (excluding student Assistants) 17.569.5Student Teaching Assistants1152.250.2Student Research Assistants121212.2Technicians/Specialists000Office/Clerical Employees1110.1Others Undergraduate Student Enrollment281818.5Graduate Student Enrollment131618.51.91. Common to both Civil and Environmental Engineering data
2. The data does not include freshmen

Environmental Engineering
Year: Fall 2002
HEAD COUNTFTERATIO TO FACULTYFTPTAdministrative122Faculty (tenure-track) 19.59.5Other Faculty (excluding student Assistants) 17.569.5Student Teaching Assistants1152.250.2Student Research Assistants121212.2Technicians/Specialists000Office/Clerical Employees1110.1Others Undergraduate Student Enrollment220202.1Graduate Student Enrollment 186202.11. Common to both Civil and Environmental Engineering data
2. The data does not include freshmen

Engineering Management
Year: Fall 2002
HEAD COUNTFTERATIO TO FACULTYFTPTAdministrative42Faculty (tenure-track)55Other Faculty (excluding student Assistants)616.33Student Teaching Assistants77.62Student Research Assistants55.44Technicians/Specialists21.09Office/Clerical Employees33.267OthersUndergraduate Student Enrollment658585.1Graduate Student Enrollment10190736.51. The data does not include freshmen
Mechanical Engineering
Year: 2002-2003
HEAD COUNTFTERATIO TO FACULTYFTPTAdministrative0.50.5Faculty (tenure-track)9.509.5Other Faculty (excluding student Assistants)284.67Student Teaching Assistants727.670.53Student Research Assistants100100.69Technicians/Specialists10.50.04Office/Clerical Employees1010.07Others Undergraduate Student Enrollment1162016211.6Graduate Student Enrollment3214680.676.591. The data does not include freshmen

II-B.6.1 Personnel and Other Policies (Summaries)
Faculty Responsibilities
A faculty member, in accepting an appointment, has a principal obligation to identify his/her professional welfare with the welfare of Stevens. His/Her responsibilities include the specific items listed below. No priority of importance is implied by the ordering, and all items are not necessarily expected to the same degree from each faculty member.
Effective teaching and counseling. This involves adequate and timely preparation for classes, maintenance of high professional standards of quality, participation in the Institute's course evaluation program, counseling students on curricular and professional matters, and seeking outside support for the development of educational programs.
Conducting basic and/or applied research or improving an art: This includes advising thesis and dissertation students, seeking financial support from outside sources, and keeping abreast of professional developments.
Writing and publishing professional papers, textbooks or other scholarly works.
Participating in outside professional activities appropriate to the above responsibilities at other academic institutions, professional societies, and/or industrial and government agencies.
Participating in Stevens' institutional and departmental committee work and in regular Institute official functions such as faculty meetings, convocation, and commencement.
Devoting at least five days per week during the academic year when regular classes are in session to discharge the above listed responsibilities. At least four days a week shall be on campus unless absence is required in which case the individual's Department Director's approval shall be obtained. Such approval shall not be unreasonably withheld.


Workloads
In addition to teaching, research and/or the development and implementation of special educational programs, the workload includes the participation in departmental or institutional committees and other professional activities. Each individual's workload shall be assigned by his/her Department Director and reviewed by the Dean of the individual's School.
The maximum teaching load averaged over the academic year shall be twelve contact hours per week. It is expected that members of the regular faculty performing research and/or other appropriate scholarly activities would not be assigned the maximum teaching load. The maximum teaching load would be assigned only in those cases where there is no evidence of research activities such as submission of proposals, publication of research papers in refereed journals, publication of textbooks, and presentation of research papers at professional society meetings. A reduced individual teaching load for research and other scholarly activities is granted by the Department Director with the approval of the Dean of the School, such reductions to be commensurate with the individual's level of research and other scholarly activities.
Consulting
Consulting with or without additional compensation is recognized as an appropriate professional activity to the extent that it enhances the professional stature and vitalizes the teaching and research capabilities of the Institute and the unit member.
Off-campus consulting shall not interfere with the unit member's primary professional responsibilities, as defined in Section 3.1.
Off-campus consulting, during the academic year when regular classes are in session, which is in excess of two (2) days per month must be approved by the Department Head and Dean of the individual's School. Such approval shall not be unreasonably withheld.
Leaves of Absence
Leaves of absence are provided by the Institute to maintain and advance the professional capabilities of the faculty and to improve the Institute's ability to perform its educational and research functions. Leaves may be granted for a period of up to one academic year.
A faculty member has an obligation to return to Stevens for further service following a sabbatical leave of absence unless other arrangements are mutually agreed upon.
To be eligible for a sabbatical leave, a faculty member must have served the Institute for at least six years in its professorial ranks and must not have had a sabbatical leave within six years. Compensation from the Institute while on sabbatical leave will be at full pay for a one-semester leave and at half pay for a full-year leave.
Promotion and Tenure
The faculty of Stevens Institute of Technology reaffirms its commitment to the highest standards of scholarship which will ensure that Stevens' unique approach to education and research advances us to the highest ranks of schools of engineering, science, and technology management in the nation.
The faculty, in concert with Department Directors and the Deans' Council, is responsible for maintaining that vigorous intellectual environment which improves Stevens' broad undergraduate and graduate curricula and its multi-disciplinary research programs. Their shared commitment to the highest professional standards enables Stevens to obtain its goals and objectives.
Candidates for promotion and tenure are evaluated according to (1) their scholarly activities, (2) their educational skills, (3) their contribution to the academic and professional community.
In brief, the Promotions and Tenure process involves the following steps:
Review of the candidate by the Departmental Promotions and Tenure Committee with recommendation to the Department Director
Nomination of candidates to the Institute Faculty Promotions and Tenure Committee (the Committee) by the Department Director
Review by the Institute Faculty Promotions and Tenure Committee and recommendation for action to the Dean’s Council
Review by the Dean’s Council and recommendation for action to the President
Review by the President and recommendation for action to the Board of Trustees
Periods of Appointment and Promotion, With and Without Tenure
Instructors: Appointments to the position of Instructor are made for a period of (1) year. Such appointments are subject to renewal on a year- by-year basis. Promotions shall be made to the rank of Assistant Professor upon the recommendation of the Department Director and approval of the Dean of the School. If an instructor is not promoted by the end of the fourth year, the appointment is automatically terminated at the end of the fourth year.
Assistant Professors: Appointments to the rank of Assistant Professor are made for a period of not more than three (3) years. Such appointments are subject to renewal for additional terms of not more than three (3) years each. Appointments for less than three years may be made; however, the total length of service as Assistant Professor shall be no more than seven (7) years. Promotions may be made at the end of any year prior to the end of the seventh year of appointment. If an Assistant Professor is not promoted by the end of the seventh year, the appointment is automatically terminated at the end of the seventh year.
Associate Professors: Promotion of Assistant Professors at Stevens to the rank of Associate Professor may be with or without tenure. If without tenure, such appointments are for not more than three (3) years. If promotion to Associate Professor is with tenure, the Faculty member shall have been found qualified for promotion and tenure by the Committee. Refer to 3.6.4.2.
Appointments to the rank of Associate Professor of persons not holding an academic position at Stevens at the time of appointment may be with or without tenure. If without tenure, such appointments are for a period of not more than three (3) years. If such appointments are made with tenure, the nomination and evaluation procedures of 3.6.4 apply, and the prospective Faculty member shall have been found qualified by the Committee for the award of tenure prior to the effective date of the appointment.
Appointments of Associate Professors are subject to renewal for additional terms, each term of not more than three (3) years. However the total length of service as Associate Professor shall not exceed seven (7) years unless the Faculty member has been found qualified for the award of tenure by the Committee and tenure awarded.
Professors : Promotions to the rank of Professor are with tenure. The Faculty member shall have been found qualified for promotion and tenure (if not previously tenured) by the Committee.
Appointments to the rank of Professor of persons not holding an academic position at Stevens at the time of appointment are for a period of not more than five (5) years and may be with or without tenure. If such appointments are made with tenure, except for appointment as President of Stevens Institute of Technology with Faculty rank of tenured professor, the prospective professor shall have been found qualified by the Committee for the award of tenure prior to the effective date of the appointment.
Appointments as non-tenured Professor are subject to renewal for additional terms, each term not to exceed five (5) years. However, the total length of service as Professor shall not exceed seven (7) years unless the Faculty member has been found qualified for the award of tenure by the Committee and tenure awarded.
Awarding of Tenure: Tenure may be awarded at the discretion of the Institute to regular Faculty members at the ranks of Associate Professor or Professor who have been recommended and found qualified for tenure by the Committee on Faculty Promotions and Tenure in accordance with the provisions of this policy.

Procedures for Promotions and Awards of Tenure
Promotions: Promotions are given at the discretion of the Institute in recognition of an individual's fitness, merit, and demonstrated commitment and contribution to the Institute's objectives. Promotion of a Faculty member to Associate Professor or Professor shall be granted only through the procedures set forth in this policy.
Tenure: Tenure is granted to an individual at the discretion of the Institute, and is a term used to denote that the holder is assured, except in case of the individual's retirement, financial exigency of Stevens, or discontinuance of an academic program or department, that the individual's services shall be terminated only for cause.
The Institute recognizes its commitment to tenured Faculty, and faced with the case of terminating tenured Faculty for reasons of financial exigency or discontinuance of an academic program or department, the Institute shall make a reasonable effort to integrate Faculty affected into other pedagogical, research, or administrative activities of the Institute. Tenure shall be granted only through the procedures set forth in this policy.
The status of tenure can be achieved only by an affirmative grant of tenure from the Board of Trustees. Neither de facto tenure nor tenure by default is recognized at this Institution.
No one may hold the Faculty ranks of assistant professor, associate professor, or full professor for a combined total of more than seven (7) years without having been found.
II-B.6.2 Faculty Salaries, Benefits, and Other Policies
Faculty Evaluations
Each year all continuing faculty members are evaluated for salary adjustments and reappointment (where appropriate). Salary changes are based solely on merit, and as a consequence, the annual faculty evaluation process plays an important role in these decisions. The annual faculty evaluation criteria include all areas in which a faculty member is expected to function, with heavy emphasis on current performance and most recent achievements.
Evaluations are performed relative to planned goals and objectives. The entire process driven by the strategic and tactical plans of the Institute. They translate into specific plans for the individual schools. They, in turn, help to determine the plan for each department in each school and the department plan determines the plans for its faculty members.
Since the faculty salary adjustments and merit salary increases are effective January 15 of each year the reporting scheme is adjusted accordingly. The procedure used in carrying out the faculty evaluation follows:
September 1 -- The Department Director sends a memorandum to the members of his/her department who are eligible for a salary review informing them that a Faculty Activities Report is to be submitted to him/her by September 30. The Report should detail the individual's activities in the areas of teaching, research, and participation in governance for the period September 1 of the previous year through August 31 of the current year.
September 30 -- The last day for submitting a Faculty Activities Report to the appropriate Department Director.
October 1 through October 31 -- The Department Director meets with each eligible faculty member in his/her department to review and evaluate the individual's performance during the previous academic year and immediately preceding years. The Department Director's evaluation and the faculty member's rebuttal are committed to writing and attached to the Faculty Activities Report. Copies of the reports are forwarded to the appropriate Dean.
November 1 through November 15 -- The Deans meet with their Department Directors to review their evaluations of their faculty. The Deans may then add their comments to the Faculty Activities Reports.
December 1 -- The deadline by which time the Deans Council shall have met to decide the salary changes for all eligible members of the faculty.
December 7 -- The deadline by which time the Deans shall have met with the President to review their recommendations for faculty salary adjustments.
December 10 -- The deadline by which time the Deans shall have notified their Department Directors of their decision..
December 15 -- The deadline by which time the Department Directors shall have notified their faculty of the Deans decision regarding the faculty salary adjustments.
December 20 -- The information on faculty salary adjustments is sent to the appropriate member of the Finance Office
Pay Policies and Procedures
Base Annual Salary: Each member of the faculty shall receive a base annual salary for carrying out his professional responsibilities, as more fully described in Section 3.1 of this Handbook, throughout the academic year commencing on or about September 1 and ending May 31 of the following year.
Salary Year: Salary payments of the base annual salary of each faculty member cover the period starting January 15 and ending January 14 of the following year.
Payment Schedule: Faculty members are paid once a month. The checks are issued on the last working day of the month except in those instances where the last day of the month falls on a Saturday, Sunday, or Holiday, in which case payment is made on the preceding scheduled work day. A statement of earnings for the pay period showing the gross earnings, itemized deductions and the net sum of the check is also provided. [The last negotiated agreement between faculty and administration specified that payment should be made on the 23rd of the month.]
Nine-month or Twelve-month Pay Option: Faculty members may elect either a nine or twelve-month pay option. Faculty members choosing to receive their salaries over a nine-month period will have their fringe benefits for the Summer months deducted from the May paycheck. Faculty members wishing to change from one option to the other may do so by notifying the Dean of Faculty on or before July 1 of the proceeding academic year in which the change is to take place.
Merit Increases: Upon the recommendation of the Department Head and with the approval of the Dean of Faculty, salary increases will be granted effective January 15 for the period of January 15 to January 14 of the following year to those faculty members found meritorious for such increases.
Salary Adjustments: The Institute may, at its discretion, make upward salary adjustments for those members of the faculty whose salaries differ substantially from the mean salaries of other members of the same rank with the same ' professional competence, length of service, and extent of commitment to the Institute

Other Benefits
Faculty and Staff of SoE are also eligible for a variety of other benefits. Information on the following topics, are included in the information package issued by the office of Personnel Relations to all faculty and staff:
A) TI-AA/CREF annuity program, and related options
B) Basic life insurance coverage, and related options
C) Sick leave policy
D) Family leave policy.
E) Prolonged disability benefits
F) Health insurance
G) Educational benefits
H) Benefits in retirement
I) Early retirement program
J) Other benefits and services include:
1. Academic regalia services
2. Check cashing and bank-deposit service
3. Counseling services
4. Faculty club
5. Parking
6. Use of Institute facilities
7. Travel reimbursement
Credit Union
Second-mortgage loans
University housing

Table II-B.6. Faculty Salary Data*
1. Stevens Institute of Technology
ProfessorAssociate ProfessorAssistant ProfessorInstructorNumber593820
High150,000118,171123,333
Mean92,79577,17066,982
Low60,522.60,00052,780

2. Charles V. Schaefer, Jr. School of Engineering
ProfessorAssociate ProfessorAssistant ProfessorInstructorNumber2711913High150,000118,17177,50177,786Mean109,496
87,53071,57269,004Low77,67070,26669,23360,094 *Adjusted to 9 month salary when applicable.

3. Average Percent Salary Raises Given to Continuing Faculty Members for the Past Six (6) Years.
UnitYear
98Year
99Year
00Year
01Year
02Year
03Institution as a Whole3.0%3.5%3.5%3.0%3.0%3.0%School of Engineering3.0%3.5%3.5%3.0%3.0%3.0%

Supervision of Part-time Faculty
Part-time faculty are hired, supervised and evaluated by each Department director and appointed by the Dean of Engineering. Part-time faculty are evaluated by the same procedures applicable to regular faculty, including student evaluations.
All courses and their syllabi are approved by the appropriate program committee and by the School Education and Assessment Committee. In multi-section courses, adjuncts use the syllabus, book list and software which are determined by the course coordinator, whose is a member of the full time faculty. The majority of multi-section courses employ a common WebCT web site for all sections where schedules, syllabi and instructional materials are posted. Part-time faculty employed in the undergraduate programs are practicing engineers, who are mostly involved in the early core design courses to which they bring a wealth of engineering experience. All part-time faculty are required to provide contact information to students and opportunities for students to communicate with them outside of class time.
II-B.7 Engineering Enrollment and Degree Data


Table II-B.7 (a). Engineering Enrollment and Degree Data (Entire School of Engineering)Student EnrollmentsDegrees AwardedSeemsterFull/Pt timeUndergraduatesGradsGraduation YearBachelorCertificateDoctorateEngineerMastersFreshmenSophomoresJuniorsSeniorsFifth YearOtherTotal (all years)Total (all years)2002FFull2442802423644001170232200329618317141Part00000115322001FFull2702443412843801177177200223714214031Part00000004142000FFull249334255273350114617720012311517026Part00000773631999FFull275264321253460115919620002131478320Part0000014143181998FFull270242328254380113215519992211269029Part0000010103641997FFull2322363141995201033140199817910310013Part000001414318


Table II-B.7 (b). Engineering Enrollment and Degree Data (Chemical Engineering)Student EnrollmentsDegrees AwardedSemesterFull/Pt timeUndergraduatesGradsGraduation YearBachelorCertificateDoctorateEngineerMastersFreshmenSophomoresJuniorsSeniorsFifth YearOtherTotal (all years)Total (all years)2002FFull182620305099132003210009Part0000000162001FFull2323272220971320021503011Part0000000312000FFull2126212520951120011900016Part0000011301999FFull2221252030911520001600012Part0000011321998FFull1912221490761619991800013Part0000000371997FFull1011191570621619981400012Part000001137

Table II-B.7 (c). Engineering Enrollment and Degree Data (Computer Engineering)Student EnrollmentsDegrees AwardedSemesterFull/Pt timeUndergraduatesGradsGraduation YearBachelorCertificateDoctorateEngineerMastersFreshmenSophomoresJuniorsSeniorsFifth YearOtherTotal (all years)Total (all years)2002FFull82928314512041436200311802027Part0000000432001FFull1009113310616044640200210401036Part0000000452000FFull9212493951304175820019500049Part0000022471999FFull1108596851503914620007400137Part0000055361998FFull76398644502501919994000019Part0000011291997FFull33444932701651619983600012Part000003328


Table II-B-7 (d). Engineering Enrollment and Degree Data (Electrical Engineering)Student EnrollmentsDegrees AwardedSemesterFull/Pt timeUndergraduatesGradsGraduation YearBachelorCertificateDoctorateEngineerMastersFreshmenSophomoresJuniorsSeniorsFifth YearOtherTotal (all years)Total (all years)2002FFull43424449201804320033901127Part0000000852001FFull39384234301562920023302029Part0000000682000FFull36393228501402520012303023Part0000000821999FFull28312931301223220002705134Part0000000691998FFull33153745201324019994505030Part00000001111997FFull10184529501072819982702013Part000000073


Table II-B.7 (e). Engineering Enrollment and Degree Data (Biomedical Concentration)Student EnrollmentsDegrees AwardedSemesterFull/Pt timeUndergraduatesGradsGraduation YearBachelorCertificateDoctorateEngineerMastersFreshmenSophomoresJuniorsSeniorsFifth YearOtherTotal (all years)Total (all years)2002FFull1484400301200320000Part000000002001FFull20430090200230000Part000000002000FFull01120040200100000Part000000001999FFull10200030200000000Part000000001998FFull00000000199900000Part000000001997FFull00000000199800000Part00000000


Table II-B.7 (f). Engineering Enrollment and Degree Data (Engineering Management)Student EnrollmentsDegrees AwardedSemesterFull/Pt timeUndergraduatesGradsGraduation YearBachelorCertificateDoctorateEngineerMastersFreshmenSophomoresJuniorsSeniorsFifth YearOtherTotal (all years)Total (all years)2002FFull6101328706422003236001Part000000072001FFull881821506002002164000Part000000012000FFull7151324706602001242000Part000000001999FFull12101519606202000174000Part000001121998FFull538151032019991315000Part0000011161997FFull34711603101998134000Part000002218


Table II-B.7 (g). Engineering Enrollment and Degree Data (Environmental Engineering)Student EnrollmentsDegrees AwardedSemesterFull/Pt timeUndergraduatesGradsGraduation YearBachelorCertificateDoctorateEngineerMastersFreshmenSophomoresJuniorsSeniorsFifth YearOtherTotal (all years)Total (all years)2002FFull2486202218200380404Part000001162001FFull2755001916200220205Part0000000102000FFull6550101715200110109Part0000000121999FFull5414101516200050008Part0000022201998FFull22862020161999902015Part0000011351997FFull19792028141998601011Part000001136


Table II-B.7 (h). Engineering Enrollment and Degree Data (Mechanical Engineering)Student EnrollmentsDegrees AwardedSemesterFull/Pt timeUndergraduatesGradsGraduation YearBachelorCertificateDoctorateEngineerMastersFreshmenSophomoresJuniorsSeniorsFifth YearOtherTotal (all years)Total (all years)2002FFull37463872601993020035104019Part0000000752001FFull43336241401832720022402010Part0000000382000FFull41583840201792220012901016Part0000022301999FFull42354939601712920003601112Part0000000281998FFull33294056801661919995801012Part0000022351997FFull202456391201511819983704016Part000001141


II-B.8 Definition of Credit Unit
Stevens is in alignment with the EAC assumption that one semester credit hour normally represents one class hour or three laboratory hours per week. One academic year normally represents at least 28 weeks of classes, exclusive of final examinations.
II-B.9 Admission and Graduation Requirements: Basic Programs
A. Admission of Students
1. Admission Criteria and Procedures: The Office of Undergraduate Admissions reviews applications for admission based on three criteria:
High school record – the course of study must contain four years of English, one year of Physics and Chemistry, four years of standard college preparatory Mathematics including Algebra I & II, Geometry and Advanced Algebra/Pre-Calculus. Performance in all areas is expected to be above average.
Standardized test results – both the SAT and CAT are accepted. Applicants are also encouraged to submit SAT II results in Math (level I & II), English and Physics or Chemistry.
Personal interview – every applicant is required to either visit campus for a meeting with an admissions counselor or meet with an alumnus in his/her respective geographic region.
2. Admission Standards: Table II-B.8 presents statistics related to the admission of students into the Stevens’ undergraduate program.

Table II-B.8. History of Admissions Standards for Freshmen (See note below)Academic YearComposite
ACT
MIN AVGSAT Range
25th – 75th Percentile
25% 75%Percentile Rank in
High School
MIN AVGNumber of New Students Enrolled2002-2003N/A1170 – 1380N/A 15%3902001-2002N/A1190 – 1360N/A 13%4162000-2001N/A1170 – 1360N/A 13%3891999-2000N/A1140 – 1350N/A 14%3841998-1999N/A1160 – 1350N/A 15%3631997-1998N/ANote on Table II-8: Stevens Institute of Technology does not offer formal admissions to engineering programs to First Time Freshmen (FTF). The numbers listed under the column New Students Enrolled reflects all FTF in all academic disciplines. Students admitted to the university can choose from all majors offered at our university. Table II-8 reflects the 25th -75th percentiles of the entering class as well as percentile rank. The National Association of College Admissions Counselors (NACAC), the governing body of college admissions professionals, prohibits the reporting of mean standardized test scores by a college or university (Statement of Good Practices - Section III subsection A.11). We are allowed to report the middle 50 percent of all first-year students enrolled, which is stated above.

3. Advanced Placement: Stevens offers its own accelerated mathematics program for advanced students, with placement based on performance on a Mathematics Diagnostic Test and the Ma 115 final exam. First year students with a score of 4 or 5 on a CEEB Advanced Placement Exam in Chemistry, History, or English are granted one semester advanced standing. Advanced standing is determined on an individual course basis which, in most cases, involves departmental interviews, evaluation and occasional testing.
4. Upper Division Placements: There are no special admissions for entry of a lower division student into the upper division other than a grade point average of 2.0 or better.
5. Transfer Students: In addition to the admissions materials described in #1, all students must submit their college transcript. Transfer credit is determined on a course-by-course basis: grades below a C- are not transferable. The following guidelines are used when evaluating transfer credits:
Students must receive a C or higher in order for the credits to transfer.
Students with credits earned 5 years or more from their date of attendance will be evaluated for credit on a case-by-case basis.
Foreign language credits are not transferable.
Stevens Institute of Technology does not guarantee that credits earned elsewhere will fully satisfy the Stevens course requirements.

In all cases, the evaluation is based upon the equivalence and level of coverage of the subject matter to the appropriate Stevens course. The placement of the proposed transfer course in the other institution’s curriculum, its prerequisites, and the number of credits, course outline and text are all reviewed. A minimum grade of “C” is required for transfer credit. Courses taken on a pass/fail basis are unacceptable. Each student must complete at least 50% of the courses toward a degree at Stevens and at least five courses must be technical electives taken in the junior and senior years.
Stevens conducts a one-year exchange program with the Technical University of Dundee. Students in the first semester of the junior year are eligible to participate in this program. The Office of the Dean of Undergraduate Academics monitors the program of any student who participates. The courses at the host institution are carefully selected to fit into the Stevens program. Each course is reviewed to ensure that appropriate ABET criteria are met and full transfer credit is normally granted to these students.
6. History of Transfer Engineering Students
Statistics related to the number of transfer students in the School of Engineering’s programs are shown in Table II-B.9.

Table II-B.9. Recent history of transfer students in SoE programsAcademic YearNumber of Transfer Students Enrolled2002-2003832001-2002792000-2001621999-2000861998 199957
Requirements for Graduation
1. Certification of Graduation Requirements:
The initial Study Plan form lists the courses that will ensure that the student meets all Program requirements. The online enrollment system does not allow students to register for a particular course unless pre- or co-requisite requirements, as specified in the Catalog, are satisfied. Substitutions are allowed only if the student meets with an academic advisor for approval and/or modifies the Study Plan. Near the end of the 7th semester, the student meets again with his or her academic advisor to complete the Application for Candidacy. This form is filled out with the student to verify what requirements need to be completed for satisfactory graduation. The Office of the Registrar also reviews the student’s file through a Degree Audit thereby ensuring that all graduating students complete the requirements for graduation. The study plan is compared to the transcript and a list of deficiencies is sent to the student prior to the final semester before graduation. A final check is made in the Office of the Registrar before graduation to ensure that any deficiencies have been made up. Examples of a completed study plan and a completed application for candidacy are shown in Table I-F.1.

   
2. Additional Modes
The Stevens Cooperative Education Program
After their admission to Stevens, students may apply to the Stevens Cooperative Education Program. Cooperative Education is an optional program. It is open to all engineering undergraduate students who have completed their first year course requirements with a minimum 2.2 GPA. Co-op students alternate semesters of full-time academic study with semesters of full-time work in their chosen field. Over the five year period, co-op students complete eight academic semesters and five or six co-op semesters. Cooperative education students complete exactly the same academic sequence as non-cooperative education students. The only difference being that semesters 3 – 6 are performed following an alternating work/study schedule. A small number of students follow a reduced load schedule.
The Cooperative Education Office maintains a file on each student’s participation and progress. Student files contain all employer evaluations as well as student evaluations of their co-op assignments, Learning Agreements, and Final Assessments. The Cooperative Education staff maintains close contact with employers, including on-site visits to assess the work environment and the quality and degree of learning taking place between student and supervisor.

Table II-B.10. Cooperative Education Student Participation By MajorEngineering Majors2002-20032001-20022000-20011999-20001998-1999Civil3243454942Chemical3538385444Computer197205180160150Electrical7271585240Environmental687119Mechanical 779194137130Management2218162825Interdisciplinary98844(Concentration: Biomed)     Total:450482446495444
Since its inception in 1986, the Stevens Cooperative Education Program has enriched the education of participating8€q x y ‡ ‰ Š œ  « ¬ Ç È á â ã ä å ø ù 




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